The difference between a career and a job

The difference between a career and a job

What is the difference between a career and a job? Trent at The Simple Dollar recently suggested the following dichotomy:

  • A job is something you do simply to earn money; a career is a series of connected employment opportunities.
  • A job has minimal impact on your future work life, while a career provides experience and learning to fuel your future.
  • A job offers few networking opportunities, but a career is loaded with them.
  • When you work at a job, you should do the minimum without annoying the boss. When you're in a career, you should go the extra mile, doing tasks beyond your minimum job description.

Though I agree with Trent on many things — our financial philosophies are very similar — I don't agree with him on this. I believe that all jobs deserve your best effort, and I believe the distinction between a job and a career is artificial.

Doing My best

During the summer after my freshman year of college, I worked as a busboy at the Holiday Inn. I was the best busboy I could be. While the other guys stood around during slack times, I looked for ways to help in the kitchen or to prepare for the lunch rush.

As a result, I got better tips from the waitresses. The manager trained me to run the cash register. Sometimes I even got to help the pantry chef. I wasn't looking for a career in food service, and I wasn't trying to brown-nose. But I enjoyed the work and gave it all I had. This made the job fun, and earned respect from people who mattered: from my boss, and from his boss, the hotel manager.

Eventually I was given a chance to wait tables. Though I tried, I wasn't particularly good with the morning breakfast crowd of businessmen and tourists. On the other hand, I was awesome at Sunday brunch. The bluehairs loved me. Before long, I was making more money working just six easy hours on Sunday than I had been while working 35 difficult hours during the rest of the week. And the busboys who used to stand around all the time were still standing around — doing the minimum (and earning the minimum).

Doing the Minimum

Two years later, I had a work-study job with the campus Summer Events department. Every afternoon from four to five, after my boss had left for the day, it was my job to answer the phone. And that's all I ever did. I never asked for more work. I never showed any enthusiasm for the job. I just answered the phone.

Another student covered the phone for an hour every morning. He, however, did more than he was asked. Much more.

Neither of us realized it at the time, but our boss had pull. As a result, the other student landed a plum job with the admissions office, but my own application to join residence life was denied. I found out later that my lack of initiative in that seemingly meaningless work-study job had played a significant role in the decision not to hire me. For better or worse, this changed my destiny.

Lessons Learned

In my life, I've held a bewildering array of jobs. The two listed above are just representative examples. Few of my jobs have been related in the sense of a traditional “career”, but almost all of them have provided resources, skills, or connections that I could use in the future. I'm convinced that:

Every job is a part of your career

Some workers spend forty years in the same department at the same company. This is a career in the traditional sense of the word. But my father's working life was also a career even though his jobs were largely unrelated: landscaper, flight instructor, box salesman. Your career is made up of all your jobs, whether they're directly connected or not. Each one of them is important.

Every job provides skills and resources for the future

As much as I hated selling insurance door-to-door, that job taught me lessons that I can apply directly to work on Get Rich Slowly. I learned that it never hurts to ask. I learned how to deal with rejection and negative feedback. While working at the box factory, I learned how to communicate with a huge variety of people. My brief stint as a computer programmer helped me develop techniques I now use to focus while writing. Even my job as a busboy offered lessons about the value of hard work and a positive attitude.

Every job offers networking opportunities

You don't know where life will lead you. You don't know which co-workers or customers you will meet later and in what context. My brother Tony was our company's box salesman for many years. Now he runs a firm that manufacturers nutritional supplements for animals. He's constantly drawing on the network of contacts he made while at the box factory in order to gather information about manufacturing, shipping, packaging, and distribution. In many ways, a non-traditional career like Tony's offers more opportunities to leverage relationships.

You should always do your best

Doing the minimum is rarely a good idea. Whether or not you think your current job is part of your career path, do your best. Do more than is asked of you. If you approach your work with a positive attitude, a willingness to learn, and a spirit of excellence, you will set yourself so far apart from your peers that your employers will be forced to take notice. It never hurts to do your best.

I'm not arguing that you should pour yourself into every job you ever have. But I do think you should treat most jobs as if they were important — because they are. They not only provide a source of immediate income, but it's possible that they can lead to better things in the future.

The Difference Between a Career And a Job

Not all careers have a single unifying theme. Some careers are homogeneous, but many are not. My wife taught high school science for eight years — now she works in a lab doing analytical chemistry. I was a box salesman for fifteen years — now I'm a writer. For a decade, my friend Wayne sold cars — now he's an accountant. Each of us has a career, even if the jobs do not seem to be related.

I think that for most people — whether they're on a traditional career path or not — a job is just a way to earn money. There are people who love their work, but even then not all of them are in a career. For most people, work is simply a necessary evil.

So what's the difference between a career and a job? I don't believe there is one. A career is simply a lifetime of jobs, whether those jobs are related or not. And while it's important to focus on your future goals, it's even more important to focus on doing the best you can right now at your current job.

A Final Note

There's one exception to the advice I've offered. In my story about the worst job I ever had, I wrote:

There are good jobs, and there are bad jobs. And then there are shitty jobs. You should strive to work only at good jobs. Sometimes you'll have to endure bad in order to meet a greater goal. But you should never put up with a shitty job.

If you are miserable at work — whether because of your boss or your co-workers or the work itself, then find another job. Don't burn your bridges, and don't do anything rash, but slowly and methodically find a new place to work. In the meantime, do the minimum. You don't have to love your job, but you should never let it ruin your life.

More about...Career

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Andreas Rilinger
Andreas Rilinger
12 years ago

You inspired me. Yes indeed, it is never just a job what you’re doing, it’s all part of your career. And it’s worth it to invest some energy. 🙂

It fully depends on your attitude how much fun you have while working. Doing less makes a job boring.

JoeD
JoeD
12 years ago

I recently relocated to the Midwest from the East Coast with my family for a job opportunity. Periodiclaly, I wonder if I made the right decision. Your blog post was a timely and supportive read for me, reaffirming that I made the right decision in that if nothing else I’m adding to my career. I look forward to your next post.

Samir
Samir
12 years ago

JD, this is fantastic advice. The saying “You get what you give” is very true in the job world. Every single job you ever take is a stepping stone, and the experience is more valuable than any wages you will receive. To this day, I draw on experiences and lessons learned from a copy shop job I had in high school.

Foxie
Foxie
12 years ago

I certainly agree with this! If nothing else, for those with limited work histories and an odd assortment of jobs, having glowing reviews from bosses is great. I can still go and visit my supervisors from my first job and know that they liked me when I was working there. I always tried to keep busy; working in the food industry, there is always something that needs cleaning! It reflected good on me because of all the other young people there who wouldn’t take the initiative to do extra work. I could clean and chat just as easily as I… Read more »

B Smith @ Wealth and Wisdom
B Smith @ Wealth and Wisdom
12 years ago

JD-I agree that any job should be done well. If it isn’t worth your best efforts move on. A job is the generic tag you use for employment. A career refers to the chain of employment that may include many jobs. Sometimes that career is random. Sometimes that career is planned. Sometimes you jump tracks and change careers. I know I personally let the wind blow me from opportunity to opportunity for years. I found that my career was no longer satisfying because my job was conflicting with other priorities. For example, my travel schedule was extreme and this was… Read more »

Alison Wiley
Alison Wiley
12 years ago

I agree that our lives are an integrated whole, and that everything we do makes a difference, in ways we cannot fully know at the time. I’m finally at a point in my life where I feel rich — and much of my richness is because I love what I do for a living, and I’m rich in relationships and outdoor life.
Alison in Oregon
http://wwww.diamondcutlife.org/

Mo Money
Mo Money
12 years ago

If you love what you are doing you will never have a job!

Joel Carry
Joel Carry
12 years ago

Having fun at your job is the most important deciding factor in trying to figure out if we want to turn this job into a career. It makes a big difference as to how we continue with our life, whether we live feeling wealthy or live feeling poor.

BPT - MoneyChangesThings
BPT - MoneyChangesThings
12 years ago

Seems like there’s something missing here. Vocation, in the spiritual sense, is what one hopes to accomplish on earth with one’s life force. To me, a job however well done, is just busy work. But one’s life work has a bigger mission – hopefully a desire to have a positive impact on the world in some way or another. Call it dream, passion, goal, mission – but ideally one should attempt to align one’s best efforts with worthy outcomes, and still be able to pay the bills….

TosaJen
TosaJen
12 years ago

Very good stuff! However, regarding the “do the minimum without annoying the boss”, I can see where this is sometimes necessary. There are many jobs (career-related or not), where you need to carefully balance giving it everything you’ve got and annoying/threatening the boss. Seriously, some jobs require leaving a good chunk of your brain at home. You can still shine by doing your assigned tasks really well and pursuing additional responsibilities, but new ideas? “Not in your job description.” I’d say that’s where I draw my line between “job” and “career” — if I learn and can contribute new ideas,… Read more »

Canadian Dream
Canadian Dream
12 years ago

Mmm interesting debate. I agree a bit with Trent and a bit with JD. It’s partly just a function of language and attitude. How do you treat what you do to make money? A job could be defined as something you do to get by and as such people would have a hard time pouring their effort into it. A career seems to imply a bit more than just a job. It has a second purpose beyond just the money. If you learn something or enjoy it and there seems to be a point to work beyond a paycheque it… Read more »

EscapeVelocity
EscapeVelocity
12 years ago

Good advice, but I sure have a problem following it, which would explain why I’m reading blogs at work :).

Jessica
Jessica
12 years ago

I hate my job. I used to love it, but now I hate it. I am a journalist in the Army National Guard. This job was awesome when I was deployed that first year after basic training. Now that I have been home a few years and work at our office at state headquarters, I hate it. It’s so different here. I don’t feel like we put out a good product (our publication is lousy). I used to try to improve on it. I have loads of advanced training that really had me inspired to start creating award winning military… Read more »

Frugal Dad
Frugal Dad
12 years ago

I don’t remember the source, but I’ve heard a story about a businessman who visited a favorite restaurant and ordered a Diet Coke. The waiter indicated they didn’t serve Diet Coke, much to the ire of the guest. He ordered a water, obviously irritated, and the waiter disappeared. In a couple minutes the waiter returned with a cold bottle of Diet Coke and a glass of ice. The guest was puzzled, “I thought you guys didn’t serve Diet Coke?” The waiter responded, “We don’t. I ran around the corner to a convenience store and picked one up for you.” The… Read more »

Ms. Penny Pincher
Ms. Penny Pincher
12 years ago

J.D. I absolutely love your blog. I’ve been following you for a couple of years now. I definitely feel like we’re on the same wave-length regarding saving, frugality and “stuff”. I totally agree with you as usual! I left this comment on The Simple Dollar on this issue but thought I would repeat myself here as well: Hi Trent, I’m a first time poster but a long time reader. I really enjoy your blog 🙂 I normally agree with your advice (except the one about the clothesline…We have one and it’s great!) but I have to heartily disagree with you… Read more »

J.D.
J.D.
12 years ago

Betsy has an interesting point regarding vocation. That’s worth exploring some in the future, I think. I’ve mentioned before that I consider this blog my vocation, and it’s only something I discovered recently in life. I wouldn’t have understood it without everything I’d done before. But I don’t think everyone finds a vocation. There are those who, for whatever reason, have jobs or careers that do not bring meaning or purpose to their lives. This isn’t bad or wrong — it’s just how it is. (And maybe that’s what Trent means when he says “career”…) Anyhow: I do think it’s… Read more »

Jessica
Jessica
12 years ago

You know what was the best job I ever had? Pizza delivery. Before I joined the Army. That job was awesome. You just drove around, listened to music, you met all sorts of crazy characters. And the people I worked with were really cool. The people you work with make all the difference. A crappy job can be awesome if your coworkers are awesome.
Of course, when I worked pizza delivery, gas was only 1.89 a gallon. I’d never deliver pizzas now!

justin chemmachel
justin chemmachel
1 year ago
Reply to  Jessica

I worked in this field as well.. until an employee (fellow driver got sick and was on the floor of the resturant.) Seems like it was a great job for me as well i can not say i did not enjoy it.

Glenn
Glenn
12 years ago

Just after graduating college I landed in a local political campaign as an intern–it was an easy job to get, I didn’t mind the candidate very much (at the time) and I didn’t want to spend the time looking for a job anyway. Even though I wasn’t personally invested in the grudgework I was doing I gave it my all, with the work ethic my parents taught me, and afterwards my boss decided to bring me to her next campaign. A few months later she called me again to go down to Philadelphia and lend some help to another campaign,… Read more »

Bhars
Bhars
12 years ago

Though I read your words regularly, I hardly take the time to share a thanks. This post of yours has moved me considerably. Comes in time of much needed solace. Thanks a lot!

elisabeth
elisabeth
12 years ago

On the one hand, I do believe you should try to enjoy every minute of your day, and if you are at work, that may mean a) doing much more than the minimum, just to keep your brain alive and also because we do feel better if we keep moving! or b) doing as little as possible because you are in a situation where you are not being respected and there are more interesting options available (internet, interesting companions, a good book…) that you can pursue while also doing all you need to do to get paid. But I’ve been… Read more »

RacerX
RacerX
12 years ago

Having no (or giving yourself no) options in life is a prison. Think of it like a shark, they have to keep moving forward or they die!

Even if you are working in a crappy job, make sure it is getting you towards where you want to go, even if that means you are just saving for school.

BTW – Nothing wrong with Graduating at 30, 40 or more!

Heather
Heather
12 years ago

Almost every job I’ve gotten has come from connections – and often from connections at a previous job. Right now I feel overworked and stuck in a high-stress job that shouldn’t be stressful. It’s office politics and their unwillingness to hire enough people or outsource parts of a project. For a long time now, I have been fantasizing about telling them what I really think, reporting them to the DOL for refusing to pay overtime, then quitting. But that would be so unwise because you never know what the future holds. Instead, I have to remind myself daily that 1.… Read more »

Chris
Chris
12 years ago

I first worked pouring foundations around pools after my freshmen year of school. Never thought I would do anything related to it ever again. Five years later I’m running a $3M project adding concrete columns and beams to an existing building. Everyone has more respect if you have stories of having a truck unload 4 yards for you to shovel around for the day.

All of the experience is interrelated.

Jessica
Jessica
12 years ago

RacerX, There’s nothing wrong with spending the next 6 years in a job with no opportunity for advancement and no benefits? Trust me, if it weren’t for my son, I would have quit this job a year ago. I’m National Guard, I’m not required to work for the Army full time. But I am a single mom and I receive no child support, so quitting this 40k a year job to go back to waitressing my way through college just isn’t an option for me anymore. Also, to keep this job that long, I’d have to re enlist for another… Read more »

Heather
Heather
12 years ago

P.S. I meant to say thank you thank you thank you for this post – It’s been part of a much-needed attitude readjustment and refocus this week.

Suzanne
Suzanne
12 years ago

Hi all, Like many of the posters here, I agree that putting in sincere effort at whatever you do–be it humdrum pay-the-bills job or super-fulfilling career–is a wise policy. I’d like to add, though, that there’s a reason for it beyond just the skills or connections even a seemingly meaningless job can bring you (although that’s an excellent point): your own sense of value and self-worth! I’ve learned that it’s a strain to live in a state of dissonance. If you spend your time doing something you really don’t want to be doing, there’s a hard-to-maintain disconnect between your heart… Read more »

chmielix
chmielix
12 years ago

Good point. An extra mile at work resulted in position of a charge in hand with little command of english at that time (still not perfect though). That gave me significantly better money than my mates with years of service in some cases. Quite a funny thing seeing them asking me what to do. But they’ve gave up long time ago when they’d started that job. Any job. That’s their’s attitude. I consider my current position as a foothold for the next step. Matter of time and incoming opportunities.

FranticWoman
FranticWoman
12 years ago

I’m all for giving each job your best – no matter the job. (it is in my nature, I do this regardless). However, I got fired from a “real” job for going above and beyone the tedious duty they gave me. I was new and on probabtion and they wanted me to learn the business from the ground up so I was to answer the phone at a busy desk during my first few months. As is my nature, I was up and running to resolve any problem that came my way (job involved patients, some who were in grave… Read more »

Carrie
Carrie
12 years ago

I have to agree with FranticWoman. It’s important to do your best (however YOU define “best” for yourself), but it CAN work against you. I’ve been in several jobs where I was rewarded for my good work by being given more work. This continued until I could no longer maintain the quality of my work. In another workplace, a burst of “best” work raised expectations of me, again to my disadvantage. Yes, do a good job, but don’t let your employer or anyone else take advantage of you in the process. In the end, it’s still just work, which is… Read more »

Luis
Luis
12 years ago

While I concur with your advice, I dissent with giving your “best” at your job. First, I would need to define what is your “best”. If your best means 100% then you might want to consider what precedents your are setting for yourself and the bar that you are raising. As a manager,boss,CEO,etc. they will expect your “best” at all times. In my eyes this might cause stress, hostility and even disagreements at your workplace. Since they already know your capabilities. This is not inferring or advocating to doing a mediocre job, but be conscious of your actions. I try… Read more »

guinness416
guinness416
12 years ago

Good comments, Frantic Woman and Carrie. Two of my colleagues are “on vacation” this week. Right now, they’re sitting in the conference room reviewing some deliverables, rather than spending time outdoors relaxing or with their friends and family. Why the rush to give up free time and send out the reports? Because the client in question wants them before going on his vacation. The same guys have given up free time before, it’s madness, not going above and beyond.

FranticWoman
FranticWoman
12 years ago

Carrie says: “I’ve been in several jobs where I was rewarded for my good work by being given more work. ”

Oy! Been there! Still there!(made me laugh anyway). I stick around though because my current job gives me advantages important to *me* (but maybe not to others). I don’t mind the lack of reward too much because of the freedom, flexibility and general ‘put up with-ness” they offer me. Let’s just say I haven’t been on time in years….*cough*…

J.D.
J.D.
12 years ago

Important point: by doing your best, I’m not advocating that folks become workaholics. Unless they want to…

Balance is very important in life. I just think it’s a good policy to put your best effort into the things that you do. For me, anyhow, it’s more rewarding…

Carrie
Carrie
12 years ago

But what is “best effort”? If I’m holding back on my day job to save energy for my more personally meaningful non-job projects, is that less than a “best effort” even though my work output is still excellent? Wise Bread has an article about a Japanese engineer who died from overwork. If that is the employer’s standard for “best effort,” then is it really worth it? I believe balance is important, but what if those in your profession believe that having a balanced life means you’re a slacker? Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s important to do an excellent… Read more »

J.D.
J.D.
12 years ago

Carrie, that seems fair enough. I like the idea of optimization. Via chat, Trent and I have been discussing our different opinions more, and he made an excellent point: by doing the minimum at certain jobs, you’re able to focus on other things that are more important. As you say: “more personally meaningful non-job projects”. Again, I think balance is the key.

zcratx
zcratx
12 years ago

Fantastic article. Presently I am in a job, where in spite of being good, have nothing to look forward to. I have wasted lot of time, resource and peace to get out of the rut. Now I am gonna take the slow and methodological approach of finding a new job. Let’s see how this work’s out.

The Bargain Shopper Lady
The Bargain Shopper Lady
12 years ago

I totally agree with your motivational post! Are their ways to instill these values into our children besides just telling them to do their best? I know my dad had me working at age 14 and I always loved to work and worked my hardest (mainly because he was my boss for two years and made me be early for work and work hard!) Later, when I got my first real job at 16, as a lifeguard, I saved 9 people and was nicknamed Mrs. Baywatch! (I wouldn’t have saved them if I was sitting on duty asleep with hangover… Read more »

Edward Moore
Edward Moore
12 years ago

Having just begun my professional life as an intern at a very big, very well-respected Fortune 500 company, I can relate to this article and found it inspiring. I work in the finance department, have aspirations to one day be a CEO of a company such as this one but sometimes have to force myself to see the bright side of being constantly asked to do things that seem menial and way beneath me. Photocopying cheques and registering them in a black folder seems to be the task of choice — a far cry from the kind of things I… Read more »

Funny about Money
Funny about Money
12 years ago

What an interesting discussion…it touches on some questions I’ve been ruminating about for the last couple of years. In a job where you’re not paid equitably, how much effort really should you put in? In a job where employees are occasionally seen to get the shaft for organizational reasons having nothing to do with their performance, how much loyalty do you owe the employer? Why are we working, anyway? I spent many years of my academic career running myself ragged and indeed being congratulated in every annual review for the excellent work I did. Didn’t make my pay any better;… Read more »

Nicky
Nicky
12 years ago

While you have a point about jobs/careers, I do think there is a different. For me, a job is something you do just to get by but don’t seek to improve yourself or advance (and improving could just be ‘doing the best you can’). A career is a path you take where you are mindful of continuous self improvement. My sister in law is a good example of this. She is a radiographer, studied very hard to become one, and refers to herself as a ‘career woman’ all the time. Yet she passes up chances for more training, and while… Read more »

Jeff coleman
Jeff coleman
11 months ago
Reply to  Nicky

I’d agree.

There is a difference between a job and a career.

I can do my very best and excel at my job, but if I don’t have an end in mind, I’ll just be doing jobs well, instead of building a series of employment, education, and networking opportunities into the goal I’m after.

Having a career goal helps me to spend time and energy on things that can help me reach it, instead of on things that ultimately become unproductive distractions.

J.D.
J.D.
12 years ago

Funny About Money’s comment is awesome!

Brian
Brian
12 years ago

J.D., I agree with your philosophy. When I was in college I worked at a retail store and I went from stocker to customer service supervisor because I did a damn good job. When we got a new store manager, I apparently impressed him enough that he wanted me to be an assistant manager. Much to his dismay, I was in school and couldn’t do it. I also think it boils down to having pride in what you do. Even when I have had shitty managers (like at another job where I was sexually harassed by a man), I still… Read more »

Naomi
Naomi
12 years ago

Thanks for the great post!

I think the perception and definition of “job” versus “career” may be based in class background as much as one’s personal value system.

Some people are intimidated and/or put off by “Career” as it sounds too daunting or foreign and only identify with “job” while your perception that “the distinction between a job and a career is artificial” shows that you are very comfortable identifying with the word “career.”

Kaila
Kaila
12 years ago

Well said!

Every job I’ve ever had has taught me SOMETHING.

And I’ve never thought it’s okay to “do the minimum without annoying the boss,” except in a situation which was somewhat similar to your insurance-sales situation. (I didn’t want to be REALLY good at ripping people off).

It might seem like half-assing a job would never matter, but I’ve found it’s a relatively small world, and you never know who your current boss might know someone in your next, better, job.

Karl Staib - Your Work Happiness Matters
Karl Staib - Your Work Happiness Matters
12 years ago

Damn you are a good writer! I learn every day that I read you.

I agree with your thoughts. We need to try our hardest to do great work. I understand where Trent is coming from and I know that I’ve been there, but when I became engaged with the job I always enjoyed myself so much more. It became more than just a paycheck. That’s what working happy is all about. Enjoying each step of the journey toward financial freedom.

Sara at On Simplicity
Sara at On Simplicity
12 years ago

I have a hard time not doing my best. Even if it’s been a summer job, I can’t help but work hard. I think it’s just the way I was raised.

But Funny About Money’s comment also hit home in that the extra initiative has rarely paid off in concrete terms. Often, it has meant getting more work placed on my shoulders for no additional benefits. I think you’re on the money when you talk about balance: doing enough to respect yourself and the people your job serves, but not to the detriment of your family and your other passions.

Joe Bob
Joe Bob
12 years ago

I think it was Dr. Martin Luther King who said, and I paraphrase here, that “the true test of a man’s character is what he does when no one is looking.”

Even if you hate your job and are miserable in it, you should give it your best shot — even while you are looking for something else.

Rob
Rob
12 years ago

Awesome post! This is why I read this site.

Tom
Tom
12 years ago

When I was young, I took a lot of temp jobs. I liked some of them, but didn’t like most. I tried to do my best at every one and often received job offers that I couldn’t accept. One day I was assigned to sweep floors in a factory for a week. Having no other temporary options, I took the job. It was tedious and boring, but I always seemed to finish early. So, I began looking for things to do. I started organizing supplies for the various departments, rearranging pallets to improve the efficiency of pulls when a product… Read more »

jeffeb3
jeffeb3
12 years ago

Hmmm. I like the idea of every job being part of your career. But I disagree in one case. You only have so much time and energy. Don’t waste it showing people where the alarm clocks are on aisle 10 when you could be spending it improving your education. Work ethic is something that needs to be learned, but even if you aren’t in school, you can learn more by picking up a useful hobby, or reading a book that expands the creativity of your brain. Recognize when the fastest track out of a job doesn’t have anything to do… Read more »

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