The rewards of frugality and thrift (or, why we scrimp and save)

Over the past couple of weeks, more than a few GRS readers have complained about the site's tone. These folks are afraid that Get Rich Slowly is turning into a column that's only about frugality and self-denial, one that is neglecting the “rich” part of the blog's title. These concerns came to the fore in last week's article about remembering to appreciate what I already have.

In that discussion, ObjectiveGeek wrote:

I want the best possible life for myself and my family. Maybe that means a dream house, or maybe that means the freedom to travel any and everywhere, but maybe that means both. I'd be proud of my dream home if I had earned the means to own it. I don't think contentment is much of a virtue — it's more of a guise for mediocrity.

Alex offered a similar sentiment:

I sometimes cringe when I see these kinds of articles. What is so wrong with wanting 5 bedrooms you may never use? What is sooooo bad about wanting a bigger house? If you have diligently saved, and planned, and you can truly afford those nice-ities in life, why not reach for them? Why not buy them?

Here's the thing: I agree with both ObjectiveGeek and Alex. If Get Rich Slowly has been frugality-minded lately, that's simply an accident of scheduling. While I believe that frugality is an important part of personal finance, GRS remains dedicated to the Big Picture, to all aspects of getting rich slowly.

There's nothing wrong with wanting more, and there's nothing wrong with reaching for nicer things in life if you've diligently planned and saved. I certainly don't mean to imply that it's bad to choose to buy things that will make you happier. But it's important to find the proper balance between what you want and what you can afford.

How I Spent My Money in the Past

It used to be that I bought a lot of little Stuff:

  • I spent hundreds of dollars a month on books and magazines.
  • I had a lot of recurring expenses, such as my monthly cable bill and magazine subscriptions.
  • I bought a lot of limited-use tech gadgets, like voice recorders and expensive digital cameras.
  • I bought too many clothes. When Kris and I went through my closet recently, I was saddened to see so many items still with their tags on!

There was plenty more, of course. Basically, I bought what I wanted without thinking. If a friend had a new gazingus pin or thneed, I'd be inclined to buy a new gazingus pin or thneed, too. And when my income went up, my spending always went up. This is how I succumbed to the tyranny of Stuff.

It's this kind of spending that I encourage you to question. I'm not saying, “Stop! Don't spend on the things that make you happy.” I'm saying, “Hold on a second. Take some time to think about the money you're spending — make sure it aligns with your priorities and goals. Don't just buy a bunch of Stuff.” Buy based on your goals and values, not out of habit.

How I Spend My Money Today

What do I mean by this? Let's take a look at how I've spent my money over the past couple of years. Each of the things I list below were purchased consciously, with money I already had, because I knew they'd make me happy.

Here's a gallery of my recent major purchases:

My Mini Cooper, which I coveted for years before I was able to save enough to buy it with cash. I bought a five-year-old used car, and have been very happy with it. Meanwhile, I'm slowly saving for an eventual replacement Mini.

My nice furniture, for which Kris and I saved until we could combine a coupon (yes, really) with a colossal sale. We got this stuff at 50% off regular pricing. That has to be the best coupon I've ever used.

My comic books. I have a monthly budget for purchasing comic books (and comic strips) in collected editions. Before I dug out of debt, my comic spending was part of the problem; now, it's part of the solution — it's part of what makes all these smart choices seem worth it.

My bicycle. It was a tough decision whether I could afford (and justify) $900 on a new bike last summer, but I'm glad I did. I've been riding this thing constantly since I returned from Alaska, and it's helping me drop the weight. Also helping me drop weight is…

My gym. I spend a lot of money to be a part of the local Crossfit gym. But I also derive a lot of value. Since joining in April, I've lost fifteen pounds. By the end of the summer, I'll be fitter (and stronger!) than I've been in my adult life. To me, that's money well spent.

My travel. Most of all, I've been spending on travel. Kris and I hope to be able to make one big trip every two years. (Maybe every year, if we're diligent.) This year is an exception. I used part of my book advance to go to Belize in February, and later in 2010 we'll travel to France and Italy.

Make no mistake: I live a rich life, for which I am tremendously grateful. But this rich life is largely a result of the choices I've made. I worked hard to dig out of debt and get where I am today. I'm fortunate to have found work that I love and am good at, and I'm lucky to be a winner in the “lottery of birth”and I make sacrifices on the things that don't matter to me so that I can indulge in the things that do.

I write about thrift and frugality a lot, but it's only because I recognize their value in helping me obtain my goals.

Important: I make certain to have a full emergency fund, and to set aside my target amounts for retirement and taxes before I spend on the fun stuff. Again, it's about managing priorities.

Conscious Spending

“I should write a post for Get Rich Slowly,” my wife told me the other day. “I could tell your readers all about how you're not frugal.” She meant that unlike what some of you think, I'm not into self-denial. I do buy nice things for myself.

But here's the difference between my current spending and my former profligate ways: I can afford everything I'm buying, and when I do buy, it's a conscious decision. I'm not financing my lifestyle on debt, and I'm not buying things just to “keep up with the Joneses” or out of habit. My spending now reflects my priorities, my goals, my values.

Because I'm spending consciously and living within my means, I'm much happier than I was before. I can't have everything I want — no $2.3 million home for me, for example — but I can have a few of the things that seem most important.

In a follow-up comment to my post last week, objectiveGeek wrote:

Of course having money for money's sake is nearly pointless, but having money for what it represents (value, effort, innovation, hard work, success) and for what it provides (freedom, time, safety, opportunity — essentially life!) is the noblest of goals.

I think that's correct. We're all striving to get rich — quickly or slowly — because of what we believe money can bring to our lives. I just think it's important to maintain balance, to remember that money and happiness aren't always connected, and to acknowledge that the best way to achieve your financial goals is to make active, conscious choices about where and when you spend your money.

Maybe it's time to officially add a fifteenth tenet to the Get Rich Slowly philosophy. Namely, you can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want.

More about...Frugality

Become A Money Boss And Join 15,000 Others

Subscribe to the GRS Insider (FREE) and we’ll give you a copy of the Money Boss Manifesto (also FREE)

Yes! Sign up and get your free gift
Become A Money Boss And Join 15,000 Others
guest
139 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
10 years ago

I don’t see that there is any need for self-denial at all. All saved money is ultimately spent. Money serves no purpose unless it is spent. So spending is the point. To be anti-spending makes no sense to me. I save because I love spending! The problem (in my view!) is that we can get caught up in habits of spending ineffectively. What you want to do is to optimize the Fun Units you obtain from each dollar of spending. Sometimes that means spending right away, other times it mean putting it off for a bit. My view is that… Read more »

Dink
Dink
10 years ago

There’s no need to worry about getting “rich” either slowly or quickly; if you’re rich in time, and comfortable financially, you’re better off than most people, poor or wealthy. Time is the real currency. Just look at what JD is showing… his time to cycle, his time to go to his gym, his time to travel. Freedom of time is what I personally strive for, where I can wake up one day and be my own master. While I’m lucky that I both enjoy my job and get paid well, it’s a complete time-suck. All I want is to reclaim… Read more »

Ben
Ben
10 years ago

Get Rich Slowly helped me realize that my spending habits were sub par. I “needed” lots of things and I “needed” them now. When I decided to ride my motorcycle for 6 months from the USA to the southern tip of South America it made it so much easier to save. I saw some light at the end of the tunnel. I passed on an extra beer at the pub because it was worth 3 beers in South America. I passed on new widgets and thingamajigs that would be fun to have but weren’t needed and weren’t going to make… Read more »

Sam
Sam
10 years ago

I think people get confused, when you plan and save for a purchase there is a level of self denial. First you deny yourself the immediate purchase. Someone who saves up to buy a car with cash can’t just run out and buy a new car. Second, I find that by saving up for a purchase I am much more deliberate in how I spend that money. If I save up for a car and it takes me a year or two years to save that money I find that I take a lot more time researching and planning the… Read more »

Doug Warshauer
Doug Warshauer
10 years ago

J.D.,

Your comment on buying your furniture at 50% off reminded me that furniture is one item where the savings can be huge if you buy it right. I used to have an investment in a furniture retailer, and I can tell you that it was very easy to get a big discount on a furniture purchase. By waiting for items to go on sale, by looking for coupons (we offered them, too!), and simply by asking for a better price, a customer could save thousands.

Meghan
Meghan
10 years ago

I’m not against the idea that you should spend your money on stuff that is important to you if you have saved and worked hard, but IMO buying a 5 bedroom house even though you may never use all that space is just wasteful. Same with people who buy those huge gas-guzzling SUVs because they think they deserve it. Those things use up resources (water, gas, oil, electricity) that are not infinite. There’s something to be said about thrift and frugality when it leads to a lifestyle that is more sustainable.

Adam
Adam
10 years ago

That furniture is *very* nice. I think your Dansette-type record player just became one of my ‘Gazingus Pins’. Where did you find it?

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
10 years ago

@Adam (#7)
A friend gave me the record player. It works (even on my brand-new Decemberists records!), but I don’t know how to repair it, and it has the feel of something on its last legs. I have my eyes out for something similar, though I’m in no hurry to buy. I just want to begin getting an idea of how much these cost and where they can be found.

Jason
Jason
10 years ago

This is why I keep coming back to this blog. The stories are well-written and thoughtful, and the reader comments are generally good. I share many of the same opinions about conscious spending and frugality. There are definitely things in this life worth spending money on!

Kevin
Kevin
10 years ago

And exactly where does your iPad purchase fit into all this “conscious spending?” 😉

Sorry, J.D., I couldn’t resist.

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
10 years ago

@Kevin (#10)
Ha. The iPad fits into the “I still make mistakes” category. I did set aside money for it, and it was a conscious choice, but it wasn’t a good choice. It’s an example of how I still have a lot to learn! 🙂

Seth @ Boy Meets Food
Seth @ Boy Meets Food
10 years ago

J.D.,
Very well-written and interesting article. That’s exactly why I have been following for so long, and will continue to be a subscriber. (Oh, I just realized Jason already beat me to this…)
Thanks.

q
q
10 years ago

Whoa! What?!

“having money for what it represents (value, effort, innovation, hard work, success) and for what it provides (freedom, time, safety, opportunity – essentially life!) is the noblest of goals.”

Neither of those reasons for having money is noble. Having money because of what it represents is vanity. Having money because it provides personal opportunity is selfish. Having money because of how you can use it to improve yourself, everyone and everything around you is noble.

Alexandra
Alexandra
10 years ago

Here here! This article is just one example of why I love reading your blog. And I think Rob Bennet’s comment was very insightful and worth some thought. We are never saving to actually keep that money – we are merely delaying a purchase in order to choose when we are going to spend that money. Some of the more frugal-based websites just depress me. It all sounds like a race to get to the bottom…”I get my food with coupons”…”yeah, well I drive all over the city to combine coupons with sales”…”yeah, well I only buy the day old… Read more »

Mary
Mary
10 years ago

Very good, thought provoking post and the kind of thinking I too embrace. Frugal living is all about living within your means and cutting back on things you don’t want or need FOR the things we do truly want. Frugal living has allowed me to live the lifestyle I want and that is the richest gift of all.

Tiffany
Tiffany
10 years ago

great post. i love the comment about being rich in time. my fiancee and i are currently working like crazy to build up our savings, pay off debt, and pay for a wedding. we also just bought our first house…so that adds to the pressure. all of this work (and time lost) has made me realize the true value of time and money. now when i see a new pair of shoes i want, or think that my clothes aren’t cute enough or in vogue, i think about all the time i spend working…and do i want that time to… Read more »

Katya
Katya
10 years ago

Like Meghan (commenter #6), I’m a little turned off by the comment from Alex quoted above, and some similar sentiments expressed by fellow commenters. I appreciate luxuries (physical and intangible) as much as the next girl. However, as Meghan pointed out, the resources of the world are not infinite, and I believe that long term frugality includes trying to use only a reasonable part of those resources, and remembering that we share the world. JD, I understand that you don’t feel comfortable or choose to promote that point of view to your readers (or reiterate it too frequently), but I… Read more »

Chickybeth
Chickybeth
10 years ago

“you can have anything you want, but you can’t have everything you want.”

That is a great saying. One I try to convince my husband of all the time. I guess I need to convince myself of it too because sometimes I get into the “all or nothing” thinking where I deprive myself a lot which feels terrible. Thanks for this post. It really brightened my day.

–Just read Alexandra’s post and am laughing! I know exactly what you mean. People do that with “green living” also and it drives me crazy!

Dave H
Dave H
10 years ago

Reminds me of the book “Cheaper by the Dozen,” in which the father of the family is the world’s most strict efficiency expert:

Someone once asked Dad: “But what do you want to save time for? What are you going to do with it?”

“For work, if you love that best,” said Dad. “For education, for beauty, for art, for pleasure.” He looked over the top of his pince-nez. “For mumblety-peg, if that’s where your heart lies.”

Robert Wall @ Finding Frugality
Robert Wall @ Finding Frugality
10 years ago

I mostly agree with Rob Bennett’s comment, except for one thing – the point of having money is not necessarily to spend it. The point of having money is having the *ability* to spend it. Tossing $10,000 in the bank in case unforeseen future events cause you to lose a job, need a major car repair, incur a significant medical bill, etc. is in the “ability to spend” category. You’re not planning on actually spending it, but if you need it, it’s there. That money may sit there until the day you die, and that doesn’t mean it was wasted… Read more »

walk
walk
10 years ago

I like your MINI (I have a 2008 R56 MINI Cooper), but really, you need to wash the brake dust off the front wheels before you take a pic! 🙂

My MINI is leased, but next year I hope to have enough saved to buy my own new or newish Cooper S with cash as well. The car is an expensive luxury that not everyone agrees with, but I get a lot of enjoyment from driving it.

Single Mom Rich Mom
Single Mom Rich Mom
10 years ago

Hopefully this means there will be more articles along the lines of Earn More vs. Spend Slow. It tends to be a motivational speaker line of talk, but if I would have focused only on spending, I’d still be making $50k/year and retiring at 65 hoping for social security to still be around. Focusing on spending less is an easier topic to cover it seems – but if you wouldn’t have pushed yourself to write that book, there would have been no advance to go on the trip with. If you wouldn’t have had the discipline to grow your site,… Read more »

Trina
Trina
10 years ago

What about the other side of the “Have Enough” continuum – when you have more than enough? Is there a point where you become so rich that you actually have a responsibility to society and the planet to spend wisely, not just according to your own wants? If you can easily afford 30 cars (think celebrity status), is it still OK to buy them? That’s quite a cost to the environment in raw materials. What if your dream home is a palatial mansion that costs enough to send 100 kids to college, feed a third world country or support organic… Read more »

Molly On Money
Molly On Money
10 years ago

Great post!
My happiness had not gone down since I decided to get frugal…has it gone up? Maybe,…yes.
My reaction is that Americans tend to overspend. We (some not all) spend money as if we have more than we really do.
And now that I think of it, I shouldn’t consider my new spending habits frugal but realistic. I no longer spend for my ‘future self’ but the one here and now.

Sheila
Sheila
10 years ago

I guess because I have similar views of saving to buy what I want to rather than just not knowing where the money went, I didn’t even notice any sort of ‘trend’ in the posts, nor did I think anything about the post you are mentioning other than yes, I agree. And you can spend way more on bicycles than that! LOL! But that’s the really cool thing about truly deciding what you want to spend money on. Even our kids have fairly expensive bicycles, but we live in Colorado and we bike a lot. However, because we were and… Read more »

Romeo
Romeo
10 years ago

The problem is, as you’ve proved, that purchasing a dream home that has five rooms that you’ll never visit defeats the entire point of this and every other financial blog.

It’s wasteful spending and money that can be directed elsewhere.

It’s no different than the popular saying, “a boat owner’s happiest two days are the day he buys his boat and the day he sales his boat”.

Nancy L.
Nancy L.
10 years ago

This is probably my favorite article that I’ve read here over the past few years. I think people sometimes substitute the mania of “frugality” in place of the mania of “overspending”. You still don’t have a healthy relationship with money if you go from one extreme to another. I’ve said many times that my personal debt reduction plan would drive most PF fans crazy. I purposely chose a slower plan that allowed me a certain amount for indulgence spending. I’ve done the full tilt, deny yourself everything plan before, and even fully paid off my debts at one point. The… Read more »

Evangeline
Evangeline
10 years ago

This is the same thing as the Dave Ramsey Approach—Get out of debt, be financially wise, save your money and then enjoy the fruits of your labor however you choose. I think the quote is “Live like no one else so you can live like no one else.” It’s all about growing up and making smart financial decisions so you are both well prepared for the future AND can have the time of your life.

Janette
Janette
10 years ago

Meghan- I love my house. If you where to be in the area, and were a friend, I have plenty of room for you to stay. If you were my daughter, you might even move your family in while you and your husband are finding a job. You could have one level, and us the other. My house uses about the same electricity as the one down the street- but is twice as big. When we worked- we drove less than 10 minutes to our jobs or the store (just two stores in our area). Our fields will continue to… Read more »

beforewisdom
beforewisdom
10 years ago

You don’t get rich by writing checks.

OTOH, over they years in frugality related forums I’ve noticed *some* people who became compulsive about saving money.

Spending large amounts of time and effort to save very little money……time that could have been used to earn much more money or enjoying life.

Being penny wise, but dollar foolish.

objectiveGeek
objectiveGeek
10 years ago

JD, thanks for addressing these concerns. I take back my criticism on the blog as a whole. Frugality has a place and you’ve done a good job of putting it in perspective. @Trina #23, I think it’s a valid question, but I don’t agree with the assumptions it is based on. Any attempt to define “enough” or “too much” inevitably leads to individuals sacrificing themselves to other ends. Whether those ends be other individuals (AKA slavery) or the environment it makes little difference. In both cases you turn man into a sacrifice. It is this view of human existence that… Read more »

Luke
Luke
10 years ago

I’ve never understood the love affair some people have with the Mini Cooper!

One of my earliest childhood memories of being in a car was being driven around in my parents’ bright orange {I’m assuming it was second hand!} Mini, and realising that I could see the road going by through the gaps in the poorly maintained floor 😀

Also, does anyone else find that they’re quite hard to get into unless you’re fairly short?

Jason
Jason
10 years ago

In response to Meghan, Trina and Katya, I would really suggest that you read “The Millionaire Next Door”, if you haven’t already done so. Outward appearance and conspicuous consumption are characteristics of “high earners”, not those who are “wealthy”. Most people who are truly wealthy are in reality quire frugal and live beneath their means, drive boring cars and live in “regular” neighborhoods. They tend to not waste things. I agree with Alexandra and Chickybeth that too often the “green” and “frugal” lifestyle people can become just as competitive, arrogant and judgmental. Frugal and green living provides a vast array… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
10 years ago

If you write about frugality, people complain. If you write about the material benefits of having been frugal, people say you’re out of touch. If you write about your mistakes, people complain… You can’t please all the people all the time, eh? But I think you’re doing a great job pleasing all of the people some of the time, because we’re all at different points in our individual journeys and GRS really does have something for everyone. Honestly, I’ve totally become hooked on this site and now check it in the morning with my cereal before my favorite web comics… Read more »

Craig
Craig
10 years ago

I love this post, cause it shows the personal rewards you have saved up for. It’s nice to highlight your success and what savings can do for you when you put the effort in.

Josh
Josh
10 years ago

I guess everyone has very different definitions of “Rich”. I feel like the only form of true wealth is being able to do and experience the things you truly care about. Is wealth really about having more things than you need or care about, or is it about being surrounded by and having access to the things you care about most?

Brian C.
Brian C.
10 years ago

I’m a little confused as to why those two people quoted in the post are even coming to this site. If you are already to the point where you can want and afford a house with 5 extra bedrooms that you will never use in addition to the rooms you actually use, then you are not trying to get rich, you already ARE rich. Do whatever you want with your money. When you Google search for “Get Rich Slowly,” the site is described as a “Weblog (that) covers frugality, saving and investing, and other aspects of money management.” Similarly, the… Read more »

Jason
Jason
10 years ago

Luke, the Mini Cooper of today is made by BMW and can be quite accommodating for pretty much anyone. They offer a wide array of customization options, not to mention they have a definite sporting character (they are very popular at autocross events), and in addition, they have very good fuel economy. The base Cooper has a MPG rating of 28 city/37 highway with a manual transmission. Changing to an automatic or the sportier model drops those numbers a bit, but for people who don’t want to have a sporty economy car, the Mini can be a good choice. Mini… Read more »

ts
ts
10 years ago

I am a concious spender not because I can’t afford the gadgets in life. I am a concious spender because I have goals that are infinitely bigger than any ‘high’ gadgets at the stores can give me. I never see not buying a cup of starback coffee a sacrifice. I get contentment from reading good books and watching great movies from the library. I get my exercise from walking the dam across from my house. I volunteer my time helping the art teacher at school. I get to be in touch with teenagers when I accompany our middle school choir-and… Read more »

Luke
Luke
10 years ago

@Jason – I’m talking about the modern models!

I was offered a lift in one a couple of years ago and found it a bit on the snug side (and at 5′ 11″ I’m no giant)…

karen
karen
10 years ago

DJ, I enjoyed both posts, as well as a number of your reader’s comments. It is very easy to fall into an “extreme” category when starting on a new path. I’ve seen it happen in life as well as the frugal blog-world. I truly believe that the key is moderation in all things. Don’t spend more than you earn, save for emergencies and your future retirement – be a good steward of your resources (money included!). It dosn’t take very long to realise that the stuff isn’t what makes a life. It’s all about your experiences and the people you… Read more »

Jason
Jason
10 years ago

I’m 6’2″ and I had found them to be no better or worse than other compacts out there. My daily driver now is a Subaru Impreza WRX. I’ve also found that there are some cars for which I find things tight (Audi A4, BMW 3-series) that other people think are huge, and vice versa.

I think a lot might have to do with what position you find comfortable in the car, specifically the angle of the seatback.

Katya
Katya
10 years ago

Janette, It sounds, from the examples you give, that you ARE using your house, rather than holding empty space for display, which is (I think) what Meghan was speaking against. I’m not sure where the rainforest comes in, as no one else mentioned traveling there. Presumably, someone who is interested in a minimal footprint would be aware of that in a rainforest as well, though your point about there being places that are more environmentally frugal for humans to live is well taken. Jason, Thanks for the recommendation–I’ve definitely seen it recommended before. I think what I was trying to… Read more »

walk
walk
10 years ago

@Luke: I am 5’11” and have no issues using the front seats. I have plenty of head and leg room despite the moonroof. I find it more roomy than a number of compact cars mostly because of the large expanses of glass. The deep bucket seats might slow down your in/out movement too. The 2007+ models are slightly larger as well. Now the rear seats are designed mostly for small-medium sized dogs, kids, etc. which is not a big surprise. I have on occasion driven with four people in my MINI on 2+ hour trips with minimum of complaints. The… Read more »

Luke
Luke
10 years ago

@walk –

I was in the back, which explains it 😉

prufock
prufock
10 years ago

I really like your response – the important thing is value. You get a lot of value out of the things you listed. I agree wholeheartedly. For me, my “thneed” (cool reference, by the way) would be musical gear.

I think maybe ObjectiveGeek and Alex should examine their questions in this regard. How is having 5 bedrooms you never use a “nice-ity”? I would call that wastefulness. It’s fine to have a dream home, but what’s the source of pride there? It’s not like you BUILT the house.

Beth
Beth
10 years ago

RE: “What is so wrong with wanting 5 bedrooms you may never use? If you have diligently saved, and planned, and you can truly afford those nice-ities in life, why not reach for them?”–BECAUSE WANTING 5 BEDROOMS YOU MAY NEVER USE ISN’T A NICITY, IT’S AN AQUISITION DISEASE. WANTING THINGS YOU CAN USE IS FINE. WANTING AND ACQUIRING THINGS YOU CAN’T USE IS A SICKNESS.

Everyday Tips
Everyday Tips
10 years ago

I totally agree that saving is great, but you have to live your life. It is all a matter of perspective. Some people may covet my house and thing I am wasteful. I may look at a 5000 square foot house and think it is wasteful and they may think they are frugal.

What matters is that you spend responsibly and have enough to take care of your family.

Cath Lawson
Cath Lawson
10 years ago

Hi JD – I love your little yellow mini. I didn’t realise they were also popular in the US.

I’ve really been enjoying all the frugal posts recently. I used to be really wasteful – most of the time spending money on crap that didn’t matter. Blogs like yours have really helped me change. My life is less stressful because I don’t have to earn more just so I can spend it on rubbish.

Like you, I prefer to spend money on stuff I really want – a good second-hand car and travel.

Martha
Martha
10 years ago

J.D., fabulous post. To repair your record player, get in touch with Ken’s Antique Electronics in Eugene: 541-485-8676, [email protected]. I’m not affiliated with them, but I live in Eugene and I have a record player!

shares