Wine on a budget: How to get good deals on wine

Wine on a budget: How to get good deals on wine

The holiday season is upon us, the time of year for family, friends, food — and wine. Yes, it's true, I associate the holidays with alcohol. It never used to be this way (probably because I didn't drink), but for the past five years, I've spent late November stocking our wine rack.

There are several reasons for this:

    • From mid-November to mid-January, the local supermarkets have huge wine sales.
    • Every winter, Consumer Reports lists holiday wine bargains. In the December 2010 issue, for example, they suggest 22 “best buys” between $4 and $15 per bottle. (Most are in the $7 to $10 range.)
  • Our circle of friends seems to have more dinner parties during the winter than at other times of the year. When we gather, we drink wine.

For a long time, I used the shotgun method of buying wine. I went to the store and bought bottles at random, usually based on whether I liked the label. (No joke!) Nowadays, however, I'm more methodical. I'm reluctant to buy a wine I haven't tried before; I mostly buy wines I know I like. And I try to get them for as little as possible.

Hunt for wine bargains!

Drink What You Like

My top tip for saving money on wine is to buy what you like. When you buy a bottle blindly, there's a chance you won't enjoy it. Buying bad wine is like pouring money down the drain. But if you stick with old favorites, wine can be an excellent value.

How can you tell what you like? You have to experiment. Wine recommendations should be treated like movie reviews: They can give you a general idea of what you're going to get, but your actual reaction will be intensely personal. To know for sure, you have to taste a wine.

When you find something you really like, write it down. For me, this only happens about once a year. When I taste a wine that knocks my socks off, I immediately send myself an e-mail so I won't forget. After doing this for the past few years, I've developed a short list (of four wines) that I'd actually like to have on hand.

There's no need to keep elaborate notes (unless you want to). I'm an unsophisticated wine drinker. Oaky? Fruity? Full of tannins? Heck if I know. Some people are serious about wine, and that's fine. For me, though, wine is fun. Eating a good meal while sharing a bottle of wine is a bonding experience. Wine brings people together. And it does that just as well at $8 a bottle as at $80 a bottle.

Note: Blind taste tests have shown repeatedly that neither wine experts nor average joes can tell the difference between fine wines and cheap wines. Price is no guarantee of quality.

Finding Wine Bargains

As much as I love it, wine can be expensive. It pains me to spend $25 on a bottle of something to drink. So I don't — not if I can help it. Instead, I keep my eye out for wine bargains. Here are five ways I save money on wine:

Supermarkets sometimes have huge wine sales

    • Wait for a sale. Yes, wine goes on sale, especially at supermarkets. Between now and the end of the year, Safeway has tons of wine marked down for the holidays, including “30% off wines priced $20 or more”. (This is true in the Portland area, anyhow.)
    • Buy in bulk. Many grocery stores offer discounts if you buy several bottles at once. Safeway, for example, gives shoppers 10% off if they buy at least six bottles. Combining this with the 30% discount I mentioned above, you can buy a $20 wine for $12.60 — or a $40 wine for $25.21. (I'm using Safeway as an example because that's our local supermarket and I know their policies.)
    • Order by the case. When you find a wine you like, stock up. Ask your local wine store or supermarket if you can order a case of the stuff — and ask if that'll earn you a discount. My friend Paul, for example, recently found a tasty pinot noir. At $24 per bottle, it wasn't something he could afford, though. When the local Fred Meyer put the wine on sale for $10 a bottle, he bought a case. By doing so, he got an extra dollar off the sale price, saving him a total of $15 per bottle!
    • Shop at a warehouse club. Most Costco stores have a fine selection of wines at reasonable prices. I'm sure other warehouse stores do, too.
    • Check discount stores. I've had several GRS readers tell me that they buy their wine at ding-and-dent stores, such as Grocery Outlet or Big Lots. (Here's an article that explains how Grocery Outlet can sell good wines for cheap.)

I'm sure there are other ways to buy wine for less, too. Consumer Reports, for example, is a fan of buying wine online. (Their wine shopping tips include advice for buying via the web.) And I've always wondered if it might be possible to get a good deal by buying directly from the winemaker. If you have tips for saving on wine, please let me know.

Further reading: If you'd like to learn more about wine, check out the Consumer Reports wine buying guide. It's a short intro to the types of wine and when to drink them.

Putting Theory Into Practice

So, how do I put these tips into practice? That's easy to answer since I've been doing so for the past couple of weeks.

First, I do 90% (or more) of our alcohol shopping at the end of the year, when the best bargains can be had (at least here in Portland). We stock up during the holidays, and then don't worry about alcohol for the rest of the year.

When I start my holiday wine shopping, I check to see if I've noted any favorite wines over the past twelve months. This year, for example, I had two: the Graffigna Centenario malbec and the Domaine de Ménard sauvignon blanc. I don't know where I drank these, but I liked them enough to make a note to myself. So, I headed to a local wine shop and ordered a case of each. (Along with cases of two past favorites.) For less than $8 a bottle, I now have wines I know I like — enough to last a year or more.

Wine invoice
Once each year, I place a big wine order, which lowers my costs.

Next, I stopped at Safeway to buy some pricier wine. (We usually take this to parties; I don't mind giving expensive wine as a hostess gift, but I can't bring myself to drink it at home. Is that weird?) Using the sale I mentioned above, I bought six bottles regularly priced $20 or more. I paid a total of $96 for wines that would normally have cost $150.

Finally, after Thanksgiving, I'll carry the latest issue of Consumer Reports with me on a trip to Costco. If I find any of their recommended wines, I'll buy two or three bottles of each.

This brief burst of wine shopping will keep us stocked for at least a year, and will save us money to boot!

A brief word about booze Wait for sales on booze.It's more difficult for me to give advice about beer and booze. I don't drink beer, and I'm under the impression that each state has different rules and regulations for the sale of distilled spirits.

Here in Oregon, for instance, liquor stores are under the oversight of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, which tightly regulates how and what they can sell, and at what price. Because prices are controlled by the state, shoppers can visit the OLCC website to download a price list and to see current specials.

My guess is that in most places, it pays to be patient. If you have favorites, wait until they go on sale. When they do, stock up. For instance, I'm a fan of Scotch whisky, and like to have my favorites (Ardbeg, Caol Ila, Lagavulin) on hand. Rather than pay full price for these, I wait until they're marked down, then buy two or three bottles. Recently, for example, I found Caol Ila discounted from $54 to $50 a bottle. I bought two bottles to tuck away for the future.

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Nancy L.
Nancy L.
9 years ago

I used to work in a liquor store, and one additional tip when you are ordering by the case is to specifically *ask* if there is a discount for buying by the case. Many smaller stores won’t mention that they can offer the discount, bc they’re hoping they can get you to pay the higher price. Also, as JD refers to, every state is different. In our state, the method that the liquor stores and distributors have set up means that there are rarely sales of wine or liquor unless the statewide distributor is trying to clear out stock. Even… Read more »

First Gen American
First Gen American
9 years ago

The tips are spot on. I’d like to add one suggestion. Find a good local wine shop with people who know what they’re talking about. My local shop keeps a record of what I’ve bought and I can update the wines I like and don’t like. They also have tastings every Saturday, so you can try before you buy. I never pick my own wine. I ask for someone at the store to help me pick it. The problem with having a favorite wine is it’s not always available forever, so like it or not, you must try new things… Read more »

lostAnnfound
lostAnnfound
9 years ago

Wine tastings are a great way to try new ones without buying a whole bottle and then finding out you don’t like it at all. A lot liquor stores in this area have tastings on Friday late afternoon or Saturday mid afternoon, usually three to six different types and it’s free. The largest store in this area has wine tastings on Saturday that start usually on Columbus Day weekend and run until the weekend before Christmas. The cost is $5.00, which is donated to a local charity, and there are usually 6 or 7 tables with approximately five to eight… Read more »

Lisa @ Cents To Save
Lisa @ Cents To Save
9 years ago

We have recently found a wine that we like. It is a Moscato wine, sweet and easy to drink. My husband and I are new to wine in general. We are going to visit a winery in Central Florida this weekend to take part in a wine tasting to help expand wine palate. But…regarding prices…I have found Sutter Hill Moscato on sale at the Winn Dixie,(local grocery store) for 6.99 a bottle. It is usually 9.99 to 10.99 reg price. At that time we bought 8 bottles…. and regret not stocking up with more. So… next time, we are definitely… Read more »

leslie
leslie
9 years ago

Hit Trader Joe’s too. You can get some really good wines at really good prices there (and I am not necessarily talking about three buck chuck although a few of those are ok too). And…they have wine tastings every day from noon – 5 where they feature a white, a red and usually something else like one of their beers. I have tried a lot of new wines over the past few months while doing my regular shopping. At least two of them have become regular purchases.

MaryR
MaryR
9 years ago

Not a big wine drinker myself, but for the holidays I’ll share a recipe I got from a local cranberry farmer.

Cranberry sauce for the Grown Ups:
Take bag of fresh cranberries, put in small saucepan. Pour in roughly 50/50 mix of real maple syrup and cabernet sauvignon until cranberries are barely covered. Cook over low heat until berries burst and mixture is syrupy.

Enjoy!

MB
MB
9 years ago

Some specialty stores or larger “beer and wine” retailers also offer classes or tastings. Total Wine, a medium-sized chain, has $25 classes I have found to be really helpful. $25 seems pricy, but if you get the chance to taste many different wines and learn about the region, grapes, and process (as well as ask questions), it can be quite a bargain! My wife and I took a champagne and sparkling wine class, and it was a great way to taste things in the $8/bottle to the $50/bottle range! (As a homebrewer, I’m bummed out to hear you: “…don’t drink… Read more »

Robin
Robin
6 years ago
Reply to  MB

Yes, that’s a bit sad not to like beer in the Portland OR area. I love this place but dislike beer. My parents boozed it up too frequently and too much altogether, drinking mainly beer until they passed out after screaming at us and each other and involving the police int heir nasty fights nearly every weekend for years. I know it’s not the BEER’s fault, but he smell of beer now turns my stomach so much I can’t get near it, even if I wanted to. It’s difficult to even EAT at a place that features many kinds of… Read more »

Jason
Jason
9 years ago

Wish they didn’t regulate booze so hard where I live (Ottawa). Lowest prices are set by the province so it’s impossible to get very good deals without travelling. Hell, the cheapest I can get a 24 of beer is $29.00 Canadian. Terrible :/

The only time I see nice savings on booze is with those 4 liter boxes of wine. And there’s something very non-elegant about pouring from a box…

JC
JC
9 years ago

Find a friend in the restaurant business who can avail you of wholesale wine deals (and the wine tastings of various distributors).

DreamChaser57
DreamChaser57
9 years ago

In my dream home, I would love to install a custom wine gallery. Invaluable tip about writing down what you like. For a graduation gift, a friend gave me a fanstastic bottle of wine. It was incredibly favorable, light and fruity – I neglected to write it down. My friend is currently in the hospital so I cannot just readily ask him what it was. You never know where you may encounter good wine. There are many fringe benefits to getting your financial house in order, and leveraging your buying power to buy in bulk is certainly one of them.… Read more »

Kim
Kim
9 years ago

Don’t forget Trader Joes! I have a rule that I won’t pay more than $5 a bottle and have gotten some AMAZING wines. The Charles Shaw (3 Buck Chuck) wines are actually pretty good.

cc
cc
9 years ago

#8, jason: i took a wine class a few years back, the box wines are actually some of the most efficient wine storage devices to keep the flavor locked in. if you’re concerned about appearances, you could use a decanter (useful for reds, nice for show for the whites).

Emmy
Emmy
9 years ago

Best post ever! I’m doing my thanksgiving grocery run tonight, will definitely keeps this in mind.

Thad
Thad
9 years ago

If you are in the DC area, may I recommend attending the events at the Washington Wine Academy … especially the beer and whisky events. Especially the whisky ones, which I teach and so am particularly partial to!

While it may not be useful for everyone to attend a full-bore tasting class, the weekly Wine & Movie events at the Arlington Drafthouse & Theater are a cheaper and less formal option.

Kyle
Kyle
9 years ago

I’ve found that the best way to buy liquor for less is to buy larger bottles. The prices are tightly controlled in my area, but you can get a lower price per ounce by buying the 1.75 L bottles instead of the 750 mL bottles.

amanda
amanda
9 years ago

Many states have weird laws that prevent membership requirements for buying alcohol at stores. This translates to non-members being able to buy alcohol at Sam’s or Costco. It also means that, for example, Kroger will give you the “membership” price for alcohol without swiping your loyalty card.

AmandaLP
AmandaLP
9 years ago

I do not drink wine, so I just try whatever anyone else is drinking 🙂

I was also reading through a magazine that said that you could turn your leftover wine into vinegar. Most of the “wine based vinegars” are not made with high quality wine, so if you already have wine that is not being used in time, this would be an additional step to capture the costs.

Jason
Jason
9 years ago

I am not a huge wine drinker but it seems like very solid advice. On the hard stuff side of the equation though I can offer some assistance. First buy what you like, not what the music videos, magazines and bartenders tell you is the best. My wife and I did a blind liquor tasting of both Gin and Vodka our two favorites. We got airplane or small bottles of most popular brands and in our case made martinis. Neither of us knew what brand we were drinking and we ranked them on a 5 point scale with tasting notes… Read more »

retirebyforty
retirebyforty
9 years ago

We love wine, but we just don’t drink that much. We joined the Willamette Valley Vineyard wine club and they send us 2 bottles a month. These are a bit pricey at $25 to $30 a bottle, but we have really enjoyed them so far. These 2 bottles a month are plenty and we are supporting a local business. I do get some cheaper wine from Costplus and Trader Joe once in a while to try. I’ll check Safeway and see if they have any good deal. I also really like getting wine from New Seasons, their wine guys are… Read more »

David
David
9 years ago

This may offend some wine purists, but we regularly buy box wine. There are some very nice varieties available in both a bottle or a box. I never pay more than about $20 for a 3L box, which is equivalent to 4 bottles! Plus it keeps better and doesn’t have as much waste in the form of bottles. Like many, we can’t tell the difference between the box stuff and the expensive bottled stuff. I’ve even read of cases where people will pour box wine into a fancy bottle to serve to their unsuspecting friends, and they can’t tell the… Read more »

1WineDude
1WineDude
9 years ago

As “a wine guy” (my website has been giving winos courage for three years running baby! 🙂 I can confirm that laws governing the sale and distro. of wine and alcohol do indeed differ from state-to-state, to the point where some of those states (like mine – PA) exert monopoly power over wine sales. So, there will be many readers of this (excellent!) post who cannot take advantage of all of the suggestions that you’ve offered. For them, there are sadly no real options but they can write their state reps. in Congress and also have their voices heard via… Read more »

Molly
Molly
9 years ago

I’ve gotten a few Groupons for online wine clubs. Good savings for delicious wine even after spending $25 for the Groupon. Don’t have to join a club in order to partake of deal. It can be a one-time thing.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
9 years ago

A few notes on bargains: 1) I don’t have room in my apartment to buy a lot of wine by the case, and I don’t have a cellar/wine fridge to keep it at the right temperature. If your wine gets too warm it will turn to vinegary swill. Add the cost of a wine fridge if you’ll be buying large quantities, or you’ll be burning money. 2) Black Box wines (wine in a box, but good) is awesome for $18 at Costco (1 box=3bottles) (that’s a New Mexico price). I’ve seen the same box at similar stores for $24. Costco… Read more »

daave
daave
9 years ago

As El Nerdo says, the Black Box wines are great. They are actually 4 bottles (3L)(at least here in S Florida). Costco currently has it for $16, so $4 a bottle is GREAT. Years ago, GOOD wine used real corks, not the synthetic ones. Then they found out synthetic are actually better at preserving the wine. Years ago, cheap wine came in a box. Now they are finding its better than bottles: its sealed, even after you “open it”, so it stays fresh much longer. Its cheaper to ship, and uses less materials. Since most wine stops aging once it… Read more »

jcos
jcos
9 years ago

For craft beer lovers, there are a few websites they can use to keep track of different beers they like: http://www.ratebeer.com, and http://www.beeradvocate.com . For people who are new to craft beer, you can look up a beer you like and look at other beers of the same style and look at the general ratings of each. In terms of saving money, some smaller stores near me offer case discounts even on mix cases of single beers…and if you live in a place where there are multiple counties/states/districts like me (just outside of Washington DC), just driving 20 minutes into… Read more »

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
9 years ago

Reading 1WineDude’s comment about contacting the winery directly “in states where it’s permitted” comes across as really strange to me here in California, where people do this all the time (it’s sort of the point behind winetasting). I’ve probably purchased more wine directly from wineries than I have otherwise. One other thing that’s interesting, is that despite the blind taste test studies that show people can’t tell expensive wine from cheap wine, there have been other studies done (I wish I had a link) that show people enjoy wine more if it costs more. Researchers have put the exact same… Read more »

erytheis
erytheis
9 years ago

Tastings are the best way to determine what you like. The grape crop is different year to year so the wine will be different as well. In good years stock up, it should age beautifully.

(Same rules apply to seasonal beers, but only age the heavy ones.)

At MB – I love homebrew and am always trying new stuff 🙂

David J
David J
9 years ago

I work for a large winery and a lot of what the other commenters are saying are absolutely true. I thought I would elaborate a little on some of the points. Alcohol distribution laws do vary state-by-state, but it gets even more complicated than that. When prohibition was repealed, the federal gov’t relegated the alcohol laws to the states. Some states then relegated to the counties, then some counties to townships, and so on. This makes for a very complicated distribution and the ability to score a great deal highly dependent on where you buy. If you like the box… Read more »

Dave
Dave
9 years ago

Be careful… those sale prices might not be a good deal. Our new Safeway is having the same 30% sale in my neighborhood (Arlington, VA) and the sale prices were *way* higher than market prices. For example, a bottle of Veuve Cliquot Yellow Label champagne goes for $37 at Costco and local wine shops, or $45 at Whole Foods. Safeway had it listed at $60, then took it down to $48 after 30% off. It is pretty ironic that the 30% off wine was actually 30% more expensive than market prices. Other tips… Once you find a shop you like,… Read more »

DennisH
DennisH
7 years ago
Reply to  Dave

Safeway jacked up the “regular” prices of many wines that I buy regularly for the 30% sale.
Very misleading (and nearly fraud in my opinion).

Buyer beware.

Also, strongly agree with the vacuum pump. It will keep wine for a few days but not for three weeks (for example at a vacation home).
Next best advise is to store wine in a refrigerator when opened to retard growth of things that make open wine taste bad.

beth2
beth2
9 years ago

Great advice – especially if you have some self-control to not drink all the alcohol before the year is over. I rarely buy alcohol (or junk food for the same reason) because I will drink it, and I will drink too much of it, if it is in the house.

@Tyler (#26) This is similar to the well-known fact that people will almost always read a book they paid for. The frequency of reading the book goes way down, though, if they didn’t pay for the book (such as, for example, a free e-book).

honeybee
honeybee
9 years ago

Agreed, tastings are the way to find out what you like. Lots of places have a Friday wine tasting (or whatever day). However… a couple of wine shops here in the Boston area have a free mega-tasting once or twice a year. It’s amazing — there are about ~100 wines to try. (!!!) (Don’t drive!!!) They also set out cheeses and water to refresh the palate. It’s an amazing opportunity to compare many wines side by side, which really has helped me to make comparisons about relative level of like and dislike. They also have these sometimes for pay —… Read more »

Jessica
Jessica
9 years ago

A note about warehouse clubs – In Texas, you can go to any Sams Club and purchase alcohol even without a membership. Many people aren’t aware of this. I do not know the policy for other states.

LJ
LJ
9 years ago

If you’re looking for something special, the Made in Oregon stores offer a 10% discount when you buy six bottles of wine (you can mix and match). They only sell Oregonian wines.

stan
stan
9 years ago

“Alcohol is more harmful than heroin or crack when the overall dangers to the individual and society are considered, according to a study in the Lancet.”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-11660210

Ken
Ken
9 years ago

I would definitely recommend wine.woot.com! They often have unbeatable deals throughout the week.

Golfing Girl
Golfing Girl
9 years ago

We, too, buy wine by the box often. My favorite whites are Almaden Mountain Rhine for a semi-sweet and Target’s Wine Cube Reisling. We also enjoy all of the Target red wine cubes such as Shiraz and Cabernet. They are particularly great when you only want one glass at a time and it stays fresh. I once told my cousin to just get us a cheap bottle of red wine for Christmas. She got us a blush champagne (Ballatore Rosso Spumante). We laughed about it afterwards, expecting a cab or merlot, but ended up using it with OJ to make… Read more »

racy_rick
racy_rick
9 years ago

I was reading through your list and it is good, but it is very west coast. I just moved to Portland and the first time I went to buy beer I went into a liquor store, big mistake. They looked at me like I was an idiot. “Why would there be beer at a liquor store?” I’ve come from an area where only liquor stores have beer and hard liquor. Well, in Minnesota (or Wisconsin) liquor stores have beer and wine and only in WI is there anything more than 3.2% at gas stations, which is common. The pricing varies… Read more »

Paul
Paul
9 years ago

You can write it down (and then lose the book) or use Snooth.com for free. I’ve been using it for a few years and has really helped me to recall good wines I’ve had before. They also have an iPhone app, but it’s not as good as the site.

chacha1
chacha1
9 years ago

Re: wine storage: in my experience, an open bottle of white doesn’t require a vacuum pump or even a stopper if you plan to drink it all within three days. White does not seem to oxidize as quickly as red; just put it in the fridge. An open bottle of red survives perfectly well on the end of my kitchen counter with a stopper. I used vacuum pumps for years and they made no discernible difference to the longevity of an open bottle. Mind you, DH and I have a glass each almost every night, so our bottles don’t have… Read more »

Jan Newbegin
Jan Newbegin
9 years ago

Standing in the aisle at Grocery Outlet, Big Lots, Cost Plus, wondering about whether to take a flyer on an unknown wine bargain, I discovered a great use for my (company paid!) smart phone. Look up wine reviews! I’ve just been using the browser, but would love a recommendation for a good app for this purpose.

bella
bella
9 years ago

I’ve got to second the comment that you live in oregon, why buy anything but local? We belon to a wine club in southern or and they ship 4 times a year. I think we probably save overall because we’ve never had a bad wine and don’t need to experiment with stuff that may be good from the liquor store. There is also the warm fuzzy from supporing a family owned small business, small enough that when we go there in the winter for a tasting, we meet win the vintner himself.

Wade
Wade
9 years ago

In buying wine, buying from the winery is not always the best deal. At a local winery (Wisconsin), my wife and I noticed that they were selling one of their more common wines for $4 more per bottle than at any grocery store that I have been to. However, they also carried more rare wines that are not generally seen in stores and others that were better deals than stores could offer. In the end it is like anything else, shop around and compare prices before making the purchase.

wino
wino
9 years ago

I will second bevmo! They have a great selection and you can buy online from them as well (https://www.bevmo.com/). If you wait until they have their semi-annual 5 cent sale (buy a bottle, get the same bottle for 5 cents) you get a great deal (almost half price). I like buying online and picking up in store, that way I can find 90+ point wines for under $20; I like to try new wines and have almost always been happy with the wines I’ve tried using this method.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
9 years ago

@#24 Dave & all — YES! Black Box is actually 4 bottles, I mixed up liters with bottles (bottles are as we all know 750ml, so 3l=4bottles). Sorry for the confusion– give that wine a try if you haven’t!

Jennifer
Jennifer
9 years ago

Unfortunately in CT we have to buy wine & hard liquor in a liquor store and only beer in grocery stores. Which means places like Trader Joes & Whole Foods do not sell wine at all. Thankfully Costco has a separate Costco liquor right next to it. I have not figured out if there are ways to get “deals” here or not. I’m much more used to CA where wine is a much bigger deal.

Brian
Brian
9 years ago

There are places that do brew your own beer or wine. These can be very cost effictive and a good way to get into making your own drink with the help of an experienced guide and their equipment.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
9 years ago

Jennifer–

Ha ha, I remember spending time in New Haven– what a pain it was to buy booze!

Something I do at Costco is look for the tags showing review points from publications (wine enthusiast, wine spectator, whatever they are called). Anything with about 90 points for $10 or less will likely be a great bargain, or at least a pretty good thing to try if you like. That saves you the trouble of going through magazine subscriptions, wine tastings, websites, etc, unless you like to spend time doing that.

Bryan
Bryan
9 years ago

@#46 Agreed on CT’s rules. Especially the not selling alcohol on Sundays, thats when I usually try to do all my shopping in one day and having only lived here a few months that always messes me up. Best tip for finding good wines. Throw a wine tasting party, invite everyone to bring a bottle of one of their favorites (if you want to be even more frugal set a $15/bottle limit), have some snacks ready and have a good time. Depending on the size of the party, everyone will have a glass or half a glass of each and… Read more »

Mike- Saving Money Today
Mike- Saving Money Today
9 years ago

So what are the 4 wines that you have on your short list??

I have a few favorites too that I drink often, but I also like to try new ones. Sometimes they aren’t that good, but I’ve found a few gems like that.

MT
MT
9 years ago

I somewhat disagree about that article concerning wine experts… the article fails to note what they define as an expert in the study.

When I bartended summers at a luxury 5 star coastal resort, one of my managers was a sommelier/Master of Wine. They literally can tell you from a blind taste test what region of the world the wine was grown, in what type of soil, etc and can pretty accurately ballpark the year. See the test FAQ: http://www.mastersofwine.org/en/examination/index.cfm

While wine people can occasionally be snooty, I really found talking with a certified expert to be very very interesting.

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