How to save hundreds by playing the drugstore game

This is a guest post from Cathy, who writes about family finances, cooking, and parenting at Chief Family Officer.

I love the philosophy of getting rich slowly by doing the fundamentals: spend less than you earn, pay off debt, and invest wisely. One way that I save money is with what I call The Drugstore Game.

The Drugstore Game involves combining manufacturer and store coupons, and taking advantage of a store's best deals. When played at the highest level, the Drugstore Game requires only a couple of dollars out of pocket each week to keep you and your family stocked on necessities like toiletries, paper goods and even groceries.

Real-Life Examples

I recently bought an 8-pack of Bounty Basic paper towels, a Venus Embrace razor, and a tube of Aquafresh Extreme Clean toothpaste for $1.81 out of pocket at CVS. If I'd bought the same items at Target (where I used to shop), I would have paid at least $13, even after manufacturer coupons. That doesn't take into account the $7.99 CVS store coupon I received that I can use on a future purchase.

At Walgreens recently, I bought ten tubes of Crest ProHealth toothpaste, three bottles of Cascade dishwashing gel, a box of two Mr. Clean Magic Erasers, two boxes of 3-oz. Dixie paper cups, two 20-ft boxes of aluminum foil, a small bottle of Dawn dishwashing liquid, a Venus Embrace razor, a tube of Blistex, an Oral B Cross Action toothbrush, four cans of Spaghetti O's, three cans of Campbells condensed soup, one can of tomato paste, and one box of cereal. I paid only $16.54 for all of these items.

Interested in savings like these? Then read on…

Playing the Game

To play the Drugstore Game well, you'll need the following fundamentals:

  1. Have an understanding of how store coupons and manufacturer coupons work together. Most people are familiar with coupons that come with the Sunday newspaper. These are generally manufacturer coupons that can be used at any store that takes coupons. Manufacturer coupons can usually be combined with a store coupon. A store coupon is one put out by the store. For example, if you have a $1 off Pampers manufacturer coupon and a $1 off Pampers CVS coupon, you can use both coupons at CVS to get $2 off a package of diapers.
  2. Have an understanding of the various store rewards programs. My personal favorite drugstore is CVS, which has the ExtraCareBucks (ECBs) program. ECBs are coupons that print at the end of a receipt after qualifying purchases. The coupons can then be used like cash on a future purchase. Each week, CVS sells items that are “free after ECBs,” meaning that if a toothbrush is on sale for $2.99, you'll get a $2.99 ECB coupon at the end of your receipt. Walgreens has a somewhat similar program called Register Rewards, as well as the monthly Easy Saver rebate program. Riteaid has the Single Check Rebate program. For a summary of the CVS and Walgreens programs, check out the “Beginners Start Here” section at Money Saving Mom (over in the sidebar). Be Thrifty Like Us has a primer on the Drugstore Game that includes Riteaid.
  3. Have an understanding of how coupons and rewards programs work together to save you money. This is the tricky part, but it is absolutely worth mastering. In the toothbrush example above, a Drugstore Game pro would never pay the full $2.99. Instead, she would probably have a $1.50 off manufacturer coupon. So she'll pay $1.49 and receive $2.99 that she can use to buy more items. A typical scenario is the one I described in the introduction, where I paid only $1.81 out of pocket. I used a $7.98 ECB coupon to make the purchase, and received $7.99 in ECBs on my receipt. This process is called “rolling over,” and it is what allows Drugstore Game pros to spend less than $2 out of pocket each week while never running out of necessities.
  4. Have good sources of information. You could sit at home poring over the weekly and monthly drugstore circulars, or you could simply sit down at your computer and visit the sites that do all the math for you. If you visit only one site for your Drugstore Game playbook, it should be Money Saving Mom, which lists all of the weekly and monthly drugstore deals, puts together sample scenarios for free or “money-making” deals, and has a robust community that supplies updates. There are many other sites that provide different scenarios, and I've found it helpful to read them and find scenarios that best match what my own needs (and coupons) are. These sites also link to available printable coupons in case you don't have one from the newspaper. You can find a list of my favorite deal sources at CFO Reviews.
  5. Have an understanding and acceptance of the necessity of buying non-necessities in order to maximize store rewards coupons. This can be a difficult concept if you are frugal and constantly ask yourself if you really need an item before you buy it. However, for maximum savings, it's essential to overcome the tendency to exercise shopping restraint. Mommy Making Money has a good explanation of how buying things she doesn't need helps her buy those things that she does. (She also describes what she does with those unnecessary items, since they do pile up!)

In my first two months of playing the Drugstore Game, I calculated that I saved over $50. And that's despite many “mistakes” because I didn't really understand how to roll over ECBs by buying non-necessities. Now that I have a much better grasp of this concept, I expect to save my family hundreds of dollars before the year is over.

Getting Started

If you want to start playing The Drugstore Game, figure out which drugstores are most convenient for you. Then check out BeCentsable for links to deals of the week for your particular store (click on the ‘Grocery Gathering' tab, then on the store name.). If you don't have the right coupons for that week's deals, don't worry! Just buy the Sunday newspaper and start with the next week's deals. (Be sure to cut out all of the coupons, not just the ones for items that you're interested in. You never know what will turn out to be a moneymaker!)

Also, when you head to the store, bring a calculator in case you have to re-work some of your deals due to some items being out of stock. And take the circulars with you (or pick them up in the store before you start walking around). The stores don't always mark the shelves properly, and sometimes the only way to tell which item qualifies for a deal is to check the printed circular.

Good luck! May you become a Drugstore Game champion!

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Penelope
Penelope
12 years ago

Ouch! Now my head hurts…

Rich
Rich
12 years ago

I’m still not completely convinced that this game is worth the time. Between clipping coupons and going to the stores each week, it’s probably what? 3 hours a week? If you live close? If I do consulting for an extra hour each week, that’ll be an extra $100 in my pocket. With that $100 I could make a single Costco trip and buy all the TP, razors, diapers and other toiletries we’ll need for the month and probably still have money left over. I’ll also have an extra 2 hours a week to use how I wish. OTOH: If I… Read more »

Ken
Ken
12 years ago

The link for Mommy Saving Money is wrong, it should be http://sahmmoney.blogspot.com/2008/05/faq-why-buy-something-you-dont-need.html

(Your link has an apostrophe in the don’t)

Dave
Dave
12 years ago

There are a lot of unhealthy and unnecessary products in that list. What a waste. I probably get savings close to those without coupons simply by living frugally and not needing a lot of that junk like unhealthy Spaghetti O’s and over-salted condensed soups. I certainly don’t use cleaning products like that, preferring good old vinegar for most things. I’ve been trying to do more coupons since the last post, but coupons generally don’t apply to a healthy lifestyle. And there are very few things in our Walgreens that we buy or need other than medicine. I’ve walked those isles… Read more »

Sam
Sam
12 years ago

I posted this question before, but post again because I’m interested in the response.

For folks who use the loyalty programs from CVS do you have any concern about having your pharmacy purchasing data lost in a security breach (which actually happened at CVS – http://www.destinationcrm.com/articles/default.asp?ArticleID=5221&TopicID=115). I shop at CVS at least once a week and I like the idea of the Drugstore Game but won’t sign up for the CVS loyalty program because of their prior security breach.

Chief Family Officer
Chief Family Officer
12 years ago

@Sam – The information in the CVS ExtraCare program is fairly noninvasive – if you get your card at the store, you actually only have to provide a name and email address to register online. I only gave my first initial, even. You can even use the card without entering any information online, I believe. (Just tell the cashier you’ll fill the form out and send it in later, even if you never do it, the card will still work fine.) If you shop there once a week, you can save tremendously by getting a card. Good luck! @Ken –… Read more »

Daniel@youngandfrugal
12 years ago

Cathy,

This is a fantastic post! Thanks for sharing all the good info. This is something I have always wanted to start doing but I never had/took the time to figure out how it all works.

Thank you!

Jennifer
Jennifer
12 years ago

I’ve been doing this with Rite Aid and Walgreens for about eight months. Unlike the author, I only buy the “free after rebate” items and I don’t buy any food items. I probably miss out on some of the deals, but I haven’t spent a penny on shampoo, tooth paste, etc. in almost a year. It takes me about 15 minutes a week to look at the circulars and plan my shopping trip.

mjukr
mjukr
12 years ago

Ugh… Spaghetti-O’s? Sorry, but I’m not going to spend hours a week visiting multiple stores, clipping coupons, and buying things I don’t need just to get a discount on terribly unhealthful foods!

That’s a very shortsighted approach. Saving money in the short-term at the expense of one’s health (leading to potentially large medical bills later) is not the approach for me.

Pass.

KC
KC
12 years ago

I do clip coupons and combine them with store coupons and rebates to save money. I rarely pay for shampoo, conditioner, or toothpaste. However I can’t take full advantage of this. I NEED good soap and GOOD detergent due to allergies and dry skin – can’t save much money there, but maybe you could. But there certainly are savings to be had by combining coupons, specials, and rebates. It doesn’t take as much time as it sounds. I don’t focus on non-needs at all.

Becky@FamilyandFinances
12 years ago

I just started the Drugstore Game at Walgreens and CVS a couple of months ago and I love it! I think that it really is for people who enjoy shopping and enjoy getting good deals. For me, it’s a way to get that shopping “bug” out of my system and spend little-to-no money doing it! I also do it for the many useful items I do buy and the donations I get to make with the stuff I don’t use. Still, I try to only buy the free items if I or someone I know can use them. If they… Read more »

Lorri
Lorri
12 years ago

While it’s true that some of the really cheap deals are on things that may be processed or deemed “unnecessary” for some, it’s a great way to stock up on household & beauty items. I’m planning to use some of my most recent “freebies” as gifts. For our family, a couple months of couponing can build a nice stockpile that will last over a year for those essentials. Then I can put it aside for a while, and pick it back up later. For those of us who are trying to stretch a single income further, it can really help.

christina
christina
12 years ago

Can someone tell me how I know if an item at CVS gives back ECBs or not? I’ve been shopping there for years, and I get the quarterly ECBs for money I spend, but I don’t think I’ve ever gotten back ECBs in an increment of more than $1. Can someone please enlighten me?

Emily
Emily
12 years ago

I’ll keep this in mind if I ever have more free time than money. At the moment, though, I’d rather pay one local retailer a few more bucks than have to schlep all over town and visit a CVS once a week. Corporate America trains us well, don’t it?

Cheap Like Me
Cheap Like Me
12 years ago

We don’t have CVS in my area, but it sounds like a good program. I tried it with Walgreens for a while, but typically, they were out of the items they advertised on sale, they didn’t have the specific item advertised (so the coupon was invalid for that item), etc. I found it to be a big headache and gave up. I did find that toiletries are the *best* things to do extreme bargain shopping with — I have a cupboard full of shampoo purchased for 50 cents! However, I am trying to take my life more natural, and in… Read more »

Gina
Gina
12 years ago

Great post, Cathy! Thank you for the link. I admit, I do the CVS shopping as part of a hobby or to indulge my shopping “bug” as well, but in theory I could cut back to only buying the necessities. I save over $200 a month on diapers and wipes by buying through the CVS Drugstore Game, as compared to purchasing them in bulk at Target and Costco before this. I also truly enjoy that I can make monthly donations of health & beauty items to my local food bank of much more $$ value than I could afford before.… Read more »

GeneralDisarray
GeneralDisarray
12 years ago

Does anyone have trouble finding circular/newspaper coupons?

Most of my circulars just state specials for that week, but don’t have actual coupons to clip. This, combined with a total lack of CVS’s in my area, makes the coupon game more or less impossible for me.

I live in the SF bay area, if anyone has any specific advice.

Shirley
Shirley
12 years ago

While I will use coupons at the grocery store to a degree and swipe my CVS card, I wouldn’t play the drugstore game. First, we live in a rural area and only have privately owned drugstores with no such discounts. The CVS stores are 20 to 25 miles away. If I have to go in them to get a prescription, etc. while in “town,” I’ll use them. Second, I am all about keeping it simple and uncluttered with supplies, etc. in my house. I don’t want to have a ton of supplies stashed even in my closet (too much stuff… Read more »

Rebecca
Rebecca
12 years ago

Why all the hating on this post? Just because you are not interested in this money saving strategy because you live far from a chain drugstore or you don’t have the space/time for stockpiling doesn’t invalidate the advice. Different tips will apply to different people. I’m a woman- should I complain about the razor post because women don’t use straight razors on their legs? Some people need to practice “black belt tightwad” tactics to save every penny. I live close to a CVS, spend an average of ten minutes a week planning/shopping there, and now get all my toiletries for… Read more »

Diatryma
Diatryma
12 years ago

This seems like a good way to get used to coupons in general, and a nice trick.

The CVS receipt coupons I’ve gotten are generally… not good. The only one I’ve thought about using was for sunblock, and it was for the fifteen-dollar three-ounce size. My ExtraCare rewards come in fifty-cent pieces that expire after a couple weeks.

I will look for manufacturer’s coupons a little more carefully, though. Could be useful.

Rich
Rich
12 years ago

@Rebecca

I don’t think people are hating the game, some of us are just having a hard time seeing it help _us_ get rich slowly. In a different situation that might not be the case.

Personally, it might save me some money, but I believe that the lost opportunity cost would be greater than the money I’d saved.

Shelley
Shelley
12 years ago

I REALLY want to support this idea because it speaks to my sense of adventure, my sense of being clever as well as my sense of saving money. However, I can not. It doesn’t work for my lifestyle. Not only do I not live near a CVS, I would rather ride my bicycle on a Sunday than sit around clipping coupons from a newspaper that I won’t read. A better strategy: the clearance bin at Walgreens (shampoo for less than a $1) or Nordstrom’s Rack (surprisingly, their toiletries can be cheap). It’s not about coupons, it’s about thinking outside “the… Read more »

Jenny(usagi)
Jenny(usagi)
12 years ago

This sounds like the same thing as the Grocery Game I keep seeing mentioned (this article finally got me interested enough to check: http://www.thegrocerygame.com and look at the description). But that site isn’t free. Not even a free trial! Meh.

I’m sure googling “Grocery Game” would get additional info for those wanting to do more research.

Ophelie
Ophelie
12 years ago

After a quick trip to the US this past weekend, I was amazed to see all the coupons and discounts you can take advantage off over there. It wasn’t unusual to see “Buy one, get two” at the grocery store, and there were coupons for *everything*. I’m wondering if someone from Canada has been successful in saving a lot of money with coupons and the like. I save a lot by using the Shopper’s Drug Mart Optimum card, but it’s nowhere near as much as what’s described in this post!

Mike
Mike
12 years ago

Thanks for the nice overview. I’d been reading sites like Money Saving Mom and Be Thrifty Like Us and was getting ready to test the waters, but hadn’t yet happened across a simplified intro. For instance, I wasn’t too clear on what Extra Care Bucks actually are… I’m glad for the clear answers.

CC
CC
12 years ago

I play the drugstore game. A lot. I am a teacher and have no additional sources of revenue (thus no extra consulting for an hour to bring in income). For me it is more than worth it. Not only am I always stocked up on all drug store supplies, but I slowly do make money in credit towards the store. At the moment, I have a gift card worth over $100 because of free-after-rebate-plus-get-paid-5-percent. I buy anything that is (or will be) free and then donate all the extras. Things I do not donate, I sell for $1-$2 each and… Read more »

Lynoure Braakman
Lynoure Braakman
12 years ago

I wanna play but coupons are very rare in Finland nowadays, let alone coupons that combine.

Becca
Becca
12 years ago

Ah, but this tactic IS invalid in some circumstances, and it’s disingenuous of the author not to state the limitations up front. “Play” this “game” for the entertainment value or because your money is a much more limited resource than your time. Otherwise, it’s just tiresome and stress-inducing. There are about seven hundred and eighty-three activities I would rather do than this “game” and since I have the income to buy a bottle of shampoo without flinching, I’ll pass.

Tyler Style
Tyler Style
12 years ago

After reading thru many of the linked pages and checking out this week’s coupon-y goodness, I’m forced to agree with most of the negative posts. This strategy only works if 1, you live an unhealthy/environmentally unfriendly lifestyle and have time/energy to invest or 2, you live healthily and in an environmentally friendly fashion but you have friends/charities that don’t plus a fair amount of free time/energy, and you are ok with supporting friends/charities in this way by investing your time and passing along these products. I’m not some who can play the game, myself. I have ugly environmental allergies (I… Read more »

partgypsy
partgypsy
12 years ago

This sounds tempting, but again the way my husband and I are trending towards is to very much reduce any drugstore spending, by finding alternative methods (cloth napkins instead of paper) and also using environmentally healthy products. We are still trying use up cleaning products purchased a year ago, and shampoo products purchased 6 months ago.
Plus I just don’t like shopping that much. For myself, the more I am in stores the more I spend. I really don’t want to do anything that encourages me to go into stores any more than I already do.

cornflower
cornflower
12 years ago

To use coupons or loyalty programs, you have to be willing and able to use them, so they are not for everyone. I use a points program for only two Canadian stores (no homeland security database access for me), and have the rule of thumb that if I have a points or loyalty program–I only buy that which I would otherwise buy anyway; the points are the gravy, so to speak. This helps me keep away from the junk and unnecessary items.

Donna
Donna
12 years ago

I play the drugstore game. I like how it stretches our household budget, and I like that I can get things to donate to others. I do enjoy couponing and I don’t spend a lot of time on it. My CVS is about a mile away and I generally bike or walk there. As for the environmental/health issue, I agree that some of the products you can get for cheap or free aren’t the most environmentally friendly or healthy products, and my family tends to reduce consumption of those items. That said, there are many many people all over the… Read more »

Joe G
Joe G
12 years ago

You don’t have to be nearly as aggressive as some of you think you need to be and still save a bunch of money. By combining coupons with sales, rebates and/or ECB/RR programs, you can essentially save a ton of money on toothpaste, toothbrushes, aspirin, shaving cream, shampoo and other items in the drug store. Most of the hardcore, aggressive couponers will tell you that these are the easiest of the items to get for free. If your time is too valuable to do this, great — don’t do it. No one is required to follow all the suggestions here.… Read more »

Jim
Jim
12 years ago

I think this is a great post. I’m puzzled by the negativity here. Lighten up folks. If this advice doesn’t suit you personally then move along to an article that does. If you make $50 an hour then clipping coupons is not efficient use of time. Shouldn’t that go without saying? If you don’t like certain products then don’t buy them, everyone is going to have varying tastes and everything I love doesn’t go on sale all the time. Part of the game is hunting for items that you want or will use. This is a big country and everyone… Read more »

db
db
12 years ago

I agree with the methods used by our poster, however, once everyone begins to perform the drugstore round-a-bout- IT WILL END.

People are greedy, why does the OP need 10 tubes of toothpaste?

Justin T
Justin T
12 years ago

Love the advice. But I’m loving the comments even move. I mean give me a break. You’re either too good to shop there or too busy to clip coupons? Either way the fact that you had/took the time to read this blows my mind.

At any rate the fact that most of you have been living off your over mortgaged refinance Mc Mansions for far too long will come down mighty hard and fast. And when it does I’ll see you in CVS with your coupons and ECB in tow. (and Spaghetti O’s too)

Lauri
Lauri
12 years ago

Thanks for the post. I have been playing the drugstore game to some extent for months now with Walgreens. 1) I live very close to 3 stores and do my shopping when it is convenient and I’m near one anyway. 2) I don’t spend hours clipping coupons on pretty Sunday mornings — I do them when it’s convenient and only clip what I will actually use. 3) I choose not to buy the processed foods and such, no one is forcing anyone to do these things, it’s up the individual. 4) I have gotten tremendous deals on toiletries and basic… Read more »

Missy Fussy
Missy Fussy
12 years ago

It’s great that someone would get paid $100 an hour for consulting. Stay at home moms–or dads (I am not one by the way) probably deserve at least that amount but unfortunately get paid zero dollars an hour. These sorts of money saving ideas are meaningful and valuable for people who are really trying to survive and bridge the gap on one salary. My husband and I both have good incomes and I make extra income on the side by writing (sometimes close to $100 an hour depending on how fast I write), but I still think this sounds fun… Read more »

Miss Cellania
Miss Cellania
12 years ago

Another fundamental you will need is a chain drugstore. We don’t have those in my town. We have mom and pop shops that sell medicine and pharmaceuticals. I was blow away to see someone bought Spaghetti-Os at a drugstore!

Jeff H.
Jeff H.
12 years ago

I see this nothing more than a game and if you like to play it great. However, I suspect your savings could be nearly as great by learning to be frugal and not buying what you don’t need. If you had a large family, I am sure the savings would add up, but for a family of 4, I doubt the savings are significant as compared to frugal living. For example, take your cheap paper towels. Yes there are times when they are highly convenient, like when the cat pukes on the rug; but most tasks can be easily done… Read more »

Erin
Erin
12 years ago

Wow, what a vast array of comments!! I do a version of the grocery game on a weekly basis myself. I am a new stay at home mom with my husband earning just enough. I save a ton of money on things we would normally purchase. We are vegetarian (nearly vegan) I use mostly natural cleaning products, I make my own soap and lotion supplies but still manage to save on the things that we really need to live. Toilet paper, razors, shaving cream for my husband are a few of the items we have to purchase. I use cloth… Read more »

Robin
Robin
12 years ago

I was VERY skeptical about this, but since it didn’t cost anything to start, and there is a CVS and a Walgreen’s within walking distance of my house, gave it a try, and get surprisingly good results. I for one am glad to have learned how to get toothpaste and shampoo for free. With 4 daughters, my family has saved quite a bit of money by playing “coupons & sales” instead of paying for these items. No, of course we don’t get spaghetti-os just because they are free, I don’t eat stuff I find on the sidewalk either. That doesn’t… Read more »

Saph -Walk With Me
Saph -Walk With Me
12 years ago

I love shopping at CVS. I stock up on toiletries and when I have enough stock, I donate the surplus. I buy things I don’t need but know that there are plenty of people that would need them so I buy them to donate them. I love being able to give and help others. I agree, Spaghetti O’s aren’t healthy but I would buy it to donate it and to someone that’s homeless, it’s food. If you have the money to pay full price for what you need, then great, just don’t knock this advice. This is what keeps me… Read more »

MaryL
MaryL
12 years ago

I use store points programs only if they offer real savings when used wisely and simply. Here in Canada, the only chain that offers a decent program is Shoppers Drug Mart. The basic points program is mediocre: 10 points per dollar spent, with 3500 points being worth $5 store credit and 75,000 points worth $150, with several other credit points in between. This means that you would normally have to spend $350 at the store to get $5 credit, or $7500 at the store to get $150 credit. But several days a year, usually close to major holidays, they offer… Read more »

Lauri
Lauri
12 years ago

Jeff — you assume that all people who maximize coupons and at the drugstores aren’t also practicing frugality, and I can tell you that for at least myself you are wrong in that assumption. You use papertowels as an example. I very rarely use them. I keep a roll or two around (that I did indeed buy for pennies at Walgreens when I bought it) but I use cloth towels and such on a daily basis. When the super duper deals on papertowels occur at Walgreens, I usually pass them up. Again — just because one maximizes the coupons, sales… Read more »

Eric
Eric
12 years ago

Thank you! Great idea. I like how some of the readers have used variations on your theme to hit the big savings in almost no time. Not sure why some would bother to explain how the system does not work for them or worse, is a gateway to an unhealthy lifestyle. Contrarians…?

TJ
TJ
12 years ago

if you want to see how much my family has saved, look at this site. my wife started it to help people to save a lot of money at this game.
Also, she has coupon trains and lists matched to the deals to take the work out of it.
it’s not that hard to do.
she even goes into detail how to do it.
enjoy
TJ

Sandi
Sandi
12 years ago

To the person who poo-poo’ed this system because he could do an extra hour of consulting a week instead and earn $100, I say that a lot of stay-at-home moms use this sytem to slash their grocery budget. Also, many people who do have a job don’t have the option of working that extra hour for extra $. Clipping coupons and checking sale flyers needn’t be a time-consuming project. Many of us do this while watching TV or talking on the phone. I don’t get why so many are knocking this system. It works for many people- if it doesn’t… Read more »

Bridget
Bridget
12 years ago

As TJ said, morethancents.info has showed me how to save money. Everything that I buy I need and will continue to need and therefore, having a surplus is nice. Anything I don’t need, I donate so all in all, it’s not a waste and everyone benefits. It’s really a matter of perspective and if you don’t think it will benefit you, then fine, but for me it’s a great way to save my money to use for other things. Ck it out, its easy to understand and shows you how to save your money. I have learned a lot from… Read more »

Ben
Ben
12 years ago

Play the game, it doesn’t take that much effort, can be fun, and does save/make you money. True, you don’t “need” everything you may get for free but consider someone else for a change. I do pick up some of the true free items and donate them to local charity. I don’t lose a penny on that deal and I get to give. And Sam, Come on, people are so scared of signing up for a drug store card but think nothing of dropping their information into the lap of huge credit card companies. You don’t even need to give… Read more »

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