Slash your grocery bill with store-brand products

Name Brands vs. Store BrandsThe October 2009 issue of Consumer Reports contains an article extolling the virtues of generic store-brand products. While shoppers used to sacrifice quality when choosing generic, that's no longer the case. From the article:

If concern about taste has kept you from trying store-brand foods, hesitate no more. In blind tests, our trained tasters compared a big national brand with a store brand in 29 food categories. Store and national brands tasted about equally good 19 times. Four times, the store brand won; six times, the national brand won.

In other words, store brands offer roughly the same quality as national brands, but at a much-reduced cost. How much reduced? Consumer Reports says that the store brands they tested cost an average of 27 percent less than the name brand equivalents.

How Much Can You Save?

Sometimes theory is one thing and reality another. It's nice that Consumer Reports can score great deals on store brands. But could I? Last week, I walked to two local grocery stores to do my own research. First I looked at Safeway, where Kris and I shop most often. Next, I walked across the street to Fred Meyer, a store we usually try to avoid. (The store is huge and its layout makes little sense to me.)

I spent an hour in each store, roaming the aisles, looking for representative prices on a variety of items. I tried to pick one item at random from every section of the store. When I'd finished, I had a list of 25 products for which each store carried the same name brand and their own store-brand equivalent.

The results actually surprised me. You can save a lot of money with store-brand products — far more than I suspected. Here's the raw data from my research:


Click to open larger image in new window

The first column lists the name-brand item I used as a basis for comparison. I've given each store two columns, one for the price of the name-brand item, and one for the generic item. On each line, red text indicates the highest-priced option and green text indicates the least expensive option.

Here's a closer look at some of these comparisons:

  • I'm out of my Head and Shoulders shampoo. I just threw away the bottle this morning. Normally I buy actual Head and Shoulders at Safeway, which costs me $5.99 if it's not on sale. If I were to instead buy the Fred Meyer store brand, I'd only pay $2.49 — a savings of nearly 60%!
  • At Safeway, standard Charmin two-ply toilet paper costs $10.99 for 12 rolls. At $9.49, the store brand isn't much cheaper. But if I were to go across the street to Fred Meyer, I'd pay just $4.89 for the store brand. (Actually, Kris and I get our toilet paper at Costco, and I have no idea what we pay.)
  • Hungry? For $2.17, you could buy a can of generic chicken noodle soup, a box of generic saltine crackers, and a bottle of generic root beer at Fred Meyer. To buy name-brand equivalents at Safeway would cost you $6.18. (You could eat three of those meals using generic Fred Meyer food for the price of one meal from Safeway.)

You get the idea. Buying store brands at Safeway would save nearly 22% for the items on this list. At Fred Meyer, I could save over 36%. And Fred Meyer store brands cost 44% less than name brands at Safeway — without the need for a “loyalty card”.

A note on methodology: While conducting this survey, I faced a tough choice. Which price should I list? The non-sale price for each item? Or the sale price? Of the 25 name-brand items listed, 15 were on sale at Safeway and 14 were on sale at Fred Meyer. (There was a lot of overlap on the sales, too.) At Safeway, 20 of the generics were on sale; 10 were on sale at Fred Meyer. I chose to list non-sale prices because it's impossible to know which items are on sale when.

Running the Numbers

I learned a number of things from this project. First off, we're shopping at the wrong grocery store. Buying name-brand products at Safeway is the most expensive way to go. Based on this list, shopping at Fred Meyer instead would save us nearly 12%, even without moving to generics.

Second, generics are not always a bargain. On 10 out of the 25 items, the Safeway generic cost as much (or more!) than the name-brand equivalent at Fred Meyer. On the other hand, Fred Meyer store-brand items offer fantastic savings, especially when compared to Safeway's name-brand selections. (The items on this list were 44% less expensive!)

Another factor to consider is that some stores have a better selection of store brands than others. Subjectively speaking, Fred Meyer seemed to have about double the number of generic items that Safeway had — and often had multiple sizes or varieties. They carried several types of store brand salsa, for example, while Safeway's selection was more limited. At both stores, the generics were generally staple items: rice, toilet paper, tomato sauce, etc.

Conclusions

“We should buy more generics,” I told Kris after collating my data.

“We do buy generics,” she said.

“We do? Like what?”

“…” she said (proving for once that Kris is not always right!).

Though Kris and I do a lot of things to save money, we don't actually buy a lot of store brands. We're not opposed to them — we just stick to brands we trust. This brand loyalty costs us money. Here's how Consumer Reports put it in the article that inspired my research: “Switching to store brands can be a painless way to cut your grocery bill.” They're right.

After conducting this experiment, I realize there are four key steps to saving big bucks on groceries. More than anything else, these actions can help struggling families cut costs:

  1. Grow whatever produce you are able. The more you grow, the more you save.
  2. Buy store brands whenever possible.
  3. For everything else, do your best to purchase items only when they're on sale. (This may mean developing a grocery price book.)
  4. Learn to clip coupons, especially for processed foods.

This exercise was eye-opening in another way. I discovered that shopping at Safeway costs us money. If the data here is representative, then switching to Fred Meyer could save us over 10% on our grocery bill. That's enough to let us dine out one extra time per month. Or it's more money we can save for our trip to France next year.

Kris and I are both wary of switching from Safeway to Fred Meyer — as I mentioned, there's more to this decision than price — but I suspect that if we give it a chance, we'll find ways to deal with Fred Meyer's annoyances and save money in the process.

More about...Frugality, Food

Become A Money Boss And Join 15,000 Others

Subscribe to the GRS Insider (FREE) and we’ll give you a copy of the Money Boss Manifesto (also FREE)

Yes! Sign up and get your free gift
Become A Money Boss And Join 15,000 Others
guest
136 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
sewingirl
sewingirl
10 years ago

Keep in mind that generics are similar but not identical. I don’t like generic cornstarch, it doesn’t thicken like the national brand. Now what would be in cornstarch except corn…starch?

Kim
Kim
10 years ago

We try store brand, but sometimes – i.e. when there are more than 4 ingredients – the taste is just not there! Thus we buy everything non-edible in store brand, and edible items if it has less than 4-ingredients (oatmeal, milk, pasta, flour, canned tomatoes, olives, frozen veggies); if more than 4 ingredients, then we get to decide (yogurt, frozen pizza). If you don’t buy a lot of processed food, you’ll be surprised how many store brand items you’ll buy! Last thing – for cereal, we just couldn’t do store brand. We tried, very very hard. Now we buy brand… Read more »

Four Pillars
Four Pillars
10 years ago

I did a similar study a couple of years ago in my area although I only compared different stores – I didn’t compare generics/brand names.

I didn’t get the same results as you – some stores were cheaper than our normal store but not by much and not on everything. Given our time contraints and the convenience of the closest store we decided to just pay a bit more and save a lot of time.

Kim
Kim
10 years ago

One more thing – I once sopke w/ a person who worked in a lightbulb factory. He said that the lightbulbs stamped “GE” and the ones stamped “CVS” came out of hte same factory, made the same exact way. The same point you quoted in your article “More Things Your Supermarket Won’t Tell You.” So storebrand is sometimes the same quality!

Alexandra
Alexandra
10 years ago

I do try the generic brand on occassion. Some of them are okay – I don’t mind stuff like canned tomatoes, corn or other veggies, or dry pasta, or some cleaning products. But a lot of the generic brands just don’t taste very good. I once tried to buy generic breaded chicken breasts – they honestly tasted like cardboard. Generic ketchup – no way – I will pay the extra $3.00 for my Heinz. I suggest that you actually BUY both the generic brand and the brand name, do a taste test and then get back to us. For me,… Read more »

Khürt Williams
Khürt Williams
10 years ago

But … what if you CAN taste a difference? Should you just buy and eat the “not so good” tasting stuff just to save the money? As for growing your own food for savings … there is no guarantee as we found out this year. Each year we plant something in our small garden patch. Usually we can get some tomatoes, peppers and some herbs in the small space we have. For the rest, we rely on a farm that uses community supported organic agriculture. We’ve been doing it for at least 4 years. We purchase an individual share for… Read more »

Christina @ Northern Cheapskate
Christina @ Northern Cheapskate
10 years ago

Thanks for the great chart! I’ve always known that buying generic can save you money, but it’s nice to see it in print. Couponing can make the prices comparable to (or even beat) name brands. The question then becomes what is your time worth? It’s nice to know that store brands offer a time-saving alternative to clipping coupons. A couple of other thoughts: Many generics are actually manufactured by the name brand company – so you may even be getting a nearly identical product for much less when you buy the store brand. Many store brands come with a satisfaction… Read more »

DDFD at DivorcedDadFrugalDad
DDFD at DivorcedDadFrugalDad
10 years ago

Great post! I try store brands quite often. When we find ones we like– we stick with ’em. However, Heinz and Hellman’s are still our ketchup and mayo, unless we make our own.

How To Make Your Own: Mayonnaise http://daddycooksquick.com/2009/06/10/how-to-make-your-own-mayonnaise.aspx
How To Make Your Own: Ketchup http://daddycooksquick.com/2009/06/11/how-to-make-your-own-ketchup.aspx

Adrienne
Adrienne
10 years ago

By only looking at the “list” price you are skewing the results. A certain % of brands are always on sale (sometimes for even less than generics). You will not save that much because you will never have a grocery cart full of “full price” items. That said I use a lot of generics (esp. for things I don’t eat) but for some items there is a huge difference in taste. I’d rather bulk up during sales for those items. Also companies change their generic suppliers frequently. If you didn’t like a product last year it’s worth trying again because… Read more »

April
April
10 years ago

I figure that generic and name-brand taste pretty similar, but we don’t really buy processed food. We do buy generic non-food items such as floss, parchment paper and foil, allergy meds, etc. Most of the time it’s the same thing, though we did buy generic paper towels once and they were worthless. Trial and error!

Foxie@CarsxGirl
10 years ago

And this is why I like the military perk of a commissary to shop at. 🙂 Prices are usually lower than other stores, AND they’re mostly national-branded items. Win-win for military families.

Not only are the prices cheaper for most national brands, but you can still use coupons and there’s no tax. It’s really the one perk that I use quite a bit to save us some money on groceries. (Since we really don’t buy a lot and eat out fairly often.)

Cindy
Cindy
10 years ago

We always compare store brand to the brand name. Sometimes the taste is not worth the savings. Especially if the item ends up in the trash. Two items we will not purchase store brand on are Oreo cookies and Hershey candy bars. My family is not too picky but these items do not compare.

RJ
RJ
10 years ago

I have to disagree with your conclusion that “store brands offer roughly the same quality as national brands.” Your source article is about name brand versus generics in taste tests. Taste does not equal quality. Both the name brand and the generic could taste the same, but be made of heavily-processed “food” of poor quality; or the generic could be made of different ingredients of lesser quality.

Edward Bussa
Edward Bussa
10 years ago

We have store in our are named Aldi. It’s of German origin and they have their own store brand. Frequently we find its store brands are of higher quality and far cheaper price than better known name brands. This experience has led me to be a believer in trying new stores and their brands.

Beth
Beth
10 years ago

JD, I’m a die-hard Fred Meyer shopper. It makes me happy to think you’re coming around! Next step: Food 4 Less!

Lulu
Lulu
10 years ago

Like most of your commentors have said, it is good to save when you can but the generics are not always of the same quality.

I can buy generic milk but I have very sensitive skin so I only use Olay brand things on my face. It just depends on your taste and I did find some things where the brand on sale with a coupon was MUCH cheaper than the generic…but that is very rare.

Peter
Peter
10 years ago

Your claim that most generics taste about the same as name brands it true for a reason. Most store brands are made in the same plants, by the same people, with the same ingredients or materials as the name brands. The company I work for, like many others, makes both store and name brand products. The store brands are roughly 15-20% cheaper and it’s both the store and our company that takes a small cut in profits to make this happen. For shoppers I would give the advice to try a small amount of a store or generic product to… Read more »

Abby
Abby
10 years ago

Thanks for this chart. Locally, I’ve found that Target has rock bottom prices on their Market Pantry/Up & Up brand for a couple of things – baby wipes and crackers are two that spring to mind. Rotating your shopping among a few stores, and knowing what to buy at each, is another way to stretch a buck.

Jeff
Jeff
10 years ago

We buy generic whenever we can, with very few exceptions. The biggest mistake I ever made with generics was when I decided to get the store brand equivalent of Cheerios, which were about half the price. They tasted fine to me, but my 18-month-old (by far the biggest consumer of Cheerios in our house) would spit them out whenever I tried to give them to him, even when I mixed them in with real Cheerios. So like Kim mentioned before me, we now try to stock up on cereal when it’s on sale. In other situations, I usually just do… Read more »

Brenda
Brenda
10 years ago

You can save HUGE by buying generic brands of OTC medicine instead of name brands. The ingredients are usually *exactly* the same, but the difference in price is enormous. For example, I had to buy cough syrup today at Walmart. The Name Brand (Robitussin) cost around $7.50 for an 8 ounce bottle. The Generic Brand (Equate) cost $2.97 for the same 8 ounces with the same ingredients. That’s a $4.53 saving on just ONE item. Likewise, Name Brand Ibuprofen (such as Advil) is often 4 or 5 dollars MORE than the store brand of “ibuprofen”, and I’ve never been able… Read more »

Josh
Josh
10 years ago

The claim that generics taste the same as national brands is generally true in my experience, but is clearly not universal. In particular, equality of taste can not be claimed for most (or all?) generic sodas. Wal-mart’s brand is barely passable, and Save-A-Lot’s “Bubba cola” – what an attractive brand name! – was almost enough to make one gag. Since I drink one or two cans per week, I won’t accept something that tastes bad, because tasting an enjoyable flavor matters more than just geting a caffeine fix. If I can save money through other means, I’ll use those instead… Read more »

reinkefj
reinkefj
10 years ago

Agree on generics EXCEPT when it comes to vegetables. I “think” there is a different taste between CERTAIN ones — brand versus generic. Catch them on sale and it’s not SO bad. imho.

Phenomenality
Phenomenality
10 years ago

I would love for someone to redo this article but from the healthy lifestyle perspective. I buy organic and local about 90% of the time… organic is VERY expensive. I probably spend over $500 a month on groceries between myself and my 2 young daughters.

Is there a way to eat and live HEALTHIER on a budget?? Without washing with carcinogenic chemicals and buying processed flour and high fructose corn syrup? (if you think you don’t, read the lables) 🙂

Patrick
Patrick
10 years ago

My uncle works for a large local New England grocery chain, and has told us for years that the store brands and the national brands of just about everything are made and packaged in the same factories.

Also, don’t forget coupons and store circulars. If you invest a Sunday morning and/or Wednesday night (when our circulars come out), you can get away with eating for just about free some weeks.

Di
Di
10 years ago

I have to agree that generics taste the same, sometimes better than brand name products. But then I only shop at Trader Joes & Vons. I prefer natural organic products from Trader Joes. It goes both ways I guess. I used to be a die hard Heinz ketchup only fan till I tried the Trader Joes organic ketchup, now Heinz tastes disgusting and I get the healthier option (no corn syrup or chemicals). I think buying generic saves a lot of money IF you buy a lot of processed foods. We don’t.

Kevin@OutOfYourRut
10 years ago

We do a lot of shopping at Sam’s, but it isn’t always cheaper there either. As much as we might rebel against the concept, there’s no substitute for knowing your prices, and there is some work involved in doing that. I think that’s why so many people default to the name brands, pay full price, then complain later. Sometimes the generics at the grocery store are even cheaper than what you can get at the food warehouses. So you also need to shop at 2-3 different stores if you want to maximize savings. But on the generic thing, we pay… Read more »

Jonathan Vaudreuil
Jonathan Vaudreuil
10 years ago

My fiancée and I were talking about this last night over buying CVS brand hand cream vs the stuff in mall stores that costs 5x more. Considering generics is more important as part of your philosophy in life than it is in practice. Odds are I will always buy Heinz ketchup, Garelick Farms all-natural milk, Cheerios, etc. Being open to generics means more than just buying some (or all) generic products. Beyond those, here’s what I mean: Second-hand suits and sports coats make up most of my dressier wardrobe. I buy other dress clothing on sale or clearance. I bought… Read more »

Dustin
Dustin
10 years ago

In general, I am fine with most generic/store brand items, although it does take some experimentation to weed out the nasty stuff when you switch brands.

Based on an article I read recently in our local newspaper, I would bet that we will see more and more store brand items. Despite the lower price, the grocer makes much bigger margins on those products and prefers to sell them versus name brand.

Dustin
EngagedMarriage.com

K Man
K Man
10 years ago

FYI – A correction – store brands and “generics” shouldn’t be used interchangeably. Store brands are just that – a brand that is associated with the store, only found there and often slightly higher in quality/price than a generic which is an item with no “brand” associated with it and can be found at any store.

TheOzz
TheOzz
10 years ago

JD,

I was glad to see your related article on the Grocery Game. As with other commenters on that post I would say that you can save way more money (50%) with coupons as oppsed to generic products. Yes, it is more work, but in my experiecne you get what you pay fopr with many generic products. I am a food snob and I like my brands. I realize that some companies produce the generic products but if it does not say “manufactured by [some brand] for [some chain]” on the label then it probably is not.

J
J
10 years ago

Just a heads up that Listerine does not make a generic of their product – so the store brand is not the same – it could be fairly similar, but it does say on the Listerine bottle that they do not authorize generics. re: the Oatmeal question – I have had luck with generic containers of Oatmeal as long as you are only buying the unflavored plain quick oats. I noticed any of the flavored packets didn’t taste as good (although that could be Acme and not representative of other store brands). If anyone is near a Weis markets (PA… Read more »

Bri
Bri
10 years ago

JD~ You may want to try Winco if there’s one close enough. I shop almost exclusively at Winco and am SHOCKED when I go to a “regular” grocery store like Albertsons, Safeway or Fred Meyer. For example, my husband really wanted string cheese the other day, so I stopped at Albertsons on the way home from work. A 24 pack of string cheese was $9.99! Same brand, same size at Winco? $4.25. If it’s an option for you and Kris, you may put Winco into the mix. (Their produce is sometimes hit or miss, but the garden and the farmer’s… Read more »

Marie
Marie
10 years ago

We’ve found that generic versus brand becomes less of an issue as we try to eat healthier, because fresh food isn’t branded. There are less than 5 items I can immediately think of that I buy at the grocery store by brand name.

ebyt
ebyt
10 years ago

I buy generics for some things, but I guess when I find something I like I tend to stick with it, so that’s why I buy a lot of name brand items too. I don’t really have much against the no name brand per se, though. I haven’t had many bad experiences with generic vs. brand name. I’ll keep this post in mind and look for more generic items on my next shopping trip. A lot of what I buy is fresh produce and meat anyway, so you don’t have too much selection in brands. I do find that with… Read more »

April
April
10 years ago

@ Brenda, You can taste the difference between Quaker and the kroger generic. Not worth the savings.

Also there is a huge difference in taste between Mt. Dew and the generic versions, so you have to stock pile when its on sale. I’ve seen Mt. Dew regularly for $5 a 12-pack and have managed to pick it up on sale for $2.50.

Lesley
Lesley
10 years ago

I’ve been making the switch to generic as well, in large part because I’ve switched to a grocery store that does generic very, very well.

I have actually had people comment on it, and while the wording is neutral there’s always a slightly negative tone to it. I guess there’s still a bit of a stigma, at least among my friends.

Re: oatmeal: I buy the generic brand steel-cut oats and they are just the same. Can’t speak to the packaged flavoured stuff though.

Amber
Amber
10 years ago

Here’s a tip for making shopping at Fred Meyer easier if you find their set-up unintuitive. Type up a grocery list with all of the items you normally buy. Arrange it by aisle at Fred Meyer. When you are ready to go shopping, simply highlight the items you need to purchase in this trip. As you walk through the store, you’ll know exactly which aisles you need to go down and which you can skip (saves time!) and you won’t have any, “I missed the . I wonder where it is” type of moments. For generics, I generally buy a… Read more »

Lily
Lily
10 years ago

“Many generics are actually manufactured by the name brand company – so you may even be getting a nearly identical product for much less when you buy the store brand.” True. I learnt that when my father had a greengrocery. I agree the situation is quite complex. I’ve been mainly shopping (here, in Italy) at Coop and Carrefour (French store chain). Coop is quite expensive as a rule, but their generics are wonderful quality. In all areas. On the other hand, Carrefour is quite cheap as a rule, but their brand products are generally hideous (food, and others). So I… Read more »

Brooke
Brooke
10 years ago

I use generic/store brand oatmeal all the time, and it’s fine. Tastes the same and much cheaper. I only buy the large containers of it, because I make my own granola with it. My kids will also eat it cooked in the microwave and add their own toppings, cinnamon, etc. Never any complaints. When I was in Las Vegas, the choices were Albertsons, Vons, Smiths (Kroger), and Walmart. Albertsons and Vons were consistently overpriced. I always shopped the sales at Smiths, including the store brand, and only occasionally shopped for groceries at Walmart. Now I live in Virginia and the… Read more »

Brenda
Brenda
10 years ago

Thank you, J, April and Lesley (and Brooke!) for your comments on the oatmeal. I should have clarified: I don’t buy the flavored stuff (just the regular oatmeal…sometimes the 3 minute stuff and sometimes the stuff that takes longer to cook). I might try the generic steel-cut. Oats are oats, right? @April: I have to admit, one of my few non-frugal food weaknesses is Pepsi. I don’t like generic cola much (you’re right, there’s a big difference), although I *could* drink it. I do like you do, and wait til my soda of choice (Pepsi) goes on sale, and then… Read more »

Beth
Beth
10 years ago

I took a quick peak in my cupboard as I was making lunch and noticed I’ve got an interesting mix of brand names and generics. It really depends on the product.

The grocery store where I shop has an in-house brand for organic food and green products, so I save a fair bit of money there.

Diane
Diane
10 years ago

Just want to mention that Fred Meyer’s loyalty program is pretty good – every quarter they send you coupons that spend like money on anything, depending on how much you spend. Also, some FM’s have gas stations, and spending something like $100 in a month will get you 10c/gallon discount. Here (Eugene) their regular price is the same as the cheapest gas in town, so the discount beats it.

Also, different FM’s have different layouts – I like one much better than the other here.

Erica Douglass
Erica Douglass
10 years ago

For Heinz ketchup, Trader Joe’s organic tastes just as good, if not better, and does not have high-fructose corn syrup.

Generic stuff really doesn’t work for me in most cases since I am gluten intolerant. I buy Trader Joe’s because they have a great list online of whether ALL of their products contain gluten.

But I do buy non-perishable staples in bulk (toilet paper, Kleenex, aluminum foil, etc.)

-Erica

Steve
Steve
10 years ago

I’m surprised at all the anti-generics comments. Yes, there are some products that aren’t as high quality. However, they usually have a 100% satisfaction policy for their store brands (at Fred Meyer at least) – if you buy one and don’t like it, take it in and they’ll give you the name brand product. So even if you don’t like it, you still save a bit! To the commenter who said generics use worse ingredients – unless you specifically know otherwise, the name brands have just as many chemicals and whatnot. I use the store brand oatmeal and I can’t… Read more »

Jesse
Jesse
10 years ago

Excellent idea and great post. My family have been buying generics since we started shopping 😉 In different areas, at different stores, there are certainly more selection of generics. Walmart’s Great Value brand it taking over their store. They have generics for about 80% of products they sell! They are usually a third of the cost and taste just the same, if not better in some cases. There are also places were bulk buying plus generics can save even more such as with cold cereal products.

Dotty
Dotty
10 years ago

This was an interesting test. I’m wondering, though, did you examine the unit prices?

Because sometimes an item can appear “cheaper” but it’s actually just smaller, regardless of whether it’s name brand or generic.

Will
Will
10 years ago

Also, if you have a brand name product that you HAVE to stick with, check out http://www.alice.com. It’s a website that sells brand name, non-perishable items at a significant discount from the grocery store. On top of that, all shipping is completely free. I promise I’m not advertising for them. My wife and I switched to them for all our non-perishable stuff, and we’re saving tens of dollars a week for the same brand name items. I believe the site was set up as a defense against exactly what this post says about store brands. Just another example where competition… Read more »

Tiffany
Tiffany
10 years ago

I have some personal insight to your location and Safeway to Fred Meyer comparison and I have a bet for you. I bet that the square footage given to food at FM is very close to the size of the Safeway. It only seems HUGE to you because you are including the space used for clothes, garden and household items (like sheets and paint). I go into the Safeway can can’t find anything, but I know where everything is in the FM. Give FM a few more trips and you will be able to find everything too.

Anna
Anna
10 years ago

The comments are so interesting! I couldn’t possibly respond to all of the ones I’d like to do. Here are my thoughts: Yes, some generics are the same as the brands. Tuna is another one- they sit in the warehouse until there’s an order, slap a label on it and ship it out. Yes, generic Mt Dew tastes HORRID. Yep- Safeway is much more expensive, in my experience. I shop at a Fred Meyer/Kroger affiliate, and I’d expect to see Oreos at $2.50 for shelf price. Often, they’re under $2 on sale. I happened to walk into a Safeway this… Read more »

MoneyNing
MoneyNing
10 years ago

An annoying layout actually may be beneficial. A very well thought-out display of goods just means that you are able to browse the store and buy lots of stuff easily, which doesn’t save you money at all. You will get used to even the most annoying layout because if you always buy the same stuff, they will always be in the same place. You go in, get what you need and get out. When everything is displayed in an awkward way, you actually won’t end up buying every related item just because they seem good at the time, which in… Read more »

shares