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Career


  • What does your job tenure say about you? (22 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Honey Smith. Recently, I wrote about networking strategies that can help advance your career, and that got me to wondering what a “typical” career looks like these days. How have careers been affected by the Great Recession? Are people able to stay in a job and retire if they love it, or is the job market more chaotic than that? And what does it say about you either way? For…

  • To what do you attribute your success — hard work or good fortune? (33 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. Every now and then, I get an email from a fellow writer who’s just starting out and wondering where to begin. “How did you do it?” they ask. “How did you make freelance writing your career?” It’s flattering, but what do I say? First of all, I’m still working to reach my own writing goals, so I’m not even sure I’d be the best person to ask….

  • 9 reasons you may never retire (42 comments)

    This article is by staff writer William Cowie. My mom passed away a little less than a year ago. All her life she was the picture of health: She walked every day and ate super-healthy. The extended family dreaded going there, because they knew there would be no sugary goodies, only healthy (boring) eats. We used to joke and say she was so healthy they’d have to shoot her on the Day of Judgment ……

  • Networking strategies can help you overcome the fear of trying to advance your career (15 comments)

    This post is by staff writer Honey Smith. I’ve written about the power of personal networks before. Unfortunately, lots of people find networking intimidating for a variety of reasons. Certainly, I used to! For me, breaking networking down into a system that I can follow helps me overcome nervousness and network effectively. Here are the two main networking strategies that I use. Networking via “keeping it warm” What it is: Keeping it warm is a pretty…

  • A better way to calculate the value of your time (20 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. It’s both fascinating and useful to calculate the value of your time. Financial freedom gives you options and flexibility. But without time, that means nothing. Time is a precious resource that we should spend wisely. But you already know this – we’ve written about it quite a bit. Knowing the value of your time is helpful for a variety of reasons: If you’re a freelancer, it can help you…

  • The 9-to-5 job: Challenging how we earn a living (42 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. (This is Part III in a series about challenging traditional measures of financial success. Part I was The “Ivory Tower”: Reconsidering the college investment. Part II was Challenging traditional measures of financial success: Homeownership.) It was the first semester of my first year of college. My friend and I were driving around our small town, looking for something to eat. But we didn’t have much money, so our…

  • Working from home … with distractions (39 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Lisa Aberle. Although I have liked almost every job I’ve ever had, I decided early on in my professional career that the most important thing to me was schedule flexibility. And so, I gravitated toward jobs that were flexible, and each new job had more flexibility than the last. I haven’t had a strict schedule since 2007, and I have to say, I like it like that. After we planned…

  • Ask the Readers: Are the “golden handcuffs” real or self-imposed? (44 comments)

    This article is by editor Linda Vergon. Last December, Honey Smith was in the throes of some major life changes – her husband started his own business, only to sell it and start a new job, adding to the pressure to move and possibly buy a house. She wrote about it in her blog post “When the right choice isn’t obvious” and basically asked the readers which direction she should take. “I’ve been steadfastly against…

  • How to negotiate when you hate negotiating (19 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. In an ideal world, you wouldn’t need to go negotiate. In an ideal world, the weather would be perfect, there would be no war, and your employer would simply say, “Hey, your value to our company has increased. Here’s ten thousand dollars.” If only, right? When it comes to earning more, negotiating is usually a necessary part of the equation. The negotiating masters among us have a serious leg…

  • A guide to managing your fear of money (23 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. My first year of high school, I was looking for an easy, goof-off elective — a class that would allow me to take a break in between Geometry and English, and maybe catch up on some magazines or take a quick nap. “Debate” sounded right up my half-assed alley. On the first day of class, I was told we’d have to attend tournaments, in which we’d debate…

  • Taking the Chairman’s Flight and other career-limiting moves to avoid (114 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Sam. Sam spent 13 years working in Equities on Wall Street and discusses financial independence strategies on Financial Samurai. Sam is also the founder of the Yakezie Network, the largest personal finance blog network on the web. Working on Wall Street was tough. I felt like I was constantly being hazed by anybody senior to me. “Sam, go get me some coffee.” “Sam, I ordered a double macchiato with…

  • Reader Stories: From side hustle to full time: When it’s time to go all-in (11 comments)

    This is a guest post from Jen Adrion, one half of the creative duo behind These Are Things. Together, she and Omar Noory craft a collection of modern maps, draw informational illustrations, and write about the business of art at MakingIt.co. Four years ago, my partner Omar and I were huddled inside, putting the finishing touches on a collaborative art piece that we’d been working on for weeks. It was a particularly cold Ohio winter,…

  • A conversation with Mr. Money Mustache (30 comments)

    Note: This article is from J.D. Roth, who founded Get Rich Slowly in 2006. J.D.’s non-financial writing can be found at More Than Money, where he recently wrote about how to be happy. As part of the Get Rich Slowly course, I interviewed 18 of my favorite financial experts. Combined, these interviews comprise over eight hours of audio and more than 200 pages of written transcripts, all of which are available as part of the…

  • ‘When She Makes More’: 10 rules for breadwinning women (144 comments)

    Note: This article is from J.D. Roth, who founded Get Rich Slowly in 2006. J.D.’s recently launched the Get Rich Slowly course, a year-long guide on how to master your money. A few years ago, my little brother moved his family to Seattle. His wife had received a promotion and an opportunity to work at her company’s flagship location. The offer was too good to refuse. There was just one problem: They moved before Tony…

  • Book review: “Eventual Millionaire” (15 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Honey Smith. There are many personal finance books and tools out there that are useful to people in all stages of personal finance. I have a lot to learn before reaching financial independence, and the editorial elves thought it would be helpful if I shared some of what I learn with you. My recent reviews include “Personal Finance for Dummies, Fifth edition,” by Eric Tyson, MBA. This week, I’m…

  • Cultivate your X-factor before it’s too late (25 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Sam. Sam spent 13 years working in Equities on Wall Street and discusses financial independence strategies on Financial Samurai. Sam is also the founder of the Yakezie Network, the largest personal finance blog network on the web. Out of the 500 or so college graduates I interviewed over a 13-year period, practically every candidate was extremely enthusiastic about getting their butts kicked working 14-hour days in finance. When you can…

  • What’s the value of work-life balance? (53 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Honey Smith. I was really struck by Kristin Wong’s recent article “Overwork and the illusion of a ‘high-paying’ job.” It’s not something that I’ve had to deal with personally, though I’ve seen people close to me wrestle with it. As an attorney, Jake makes a six-figure salary at his new job, but probably works 80+ hours in a week. While this is undoubtedly tough (on his health, on his…

  • Overwork and the illusion of a “high-paying” job (68 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. I recently read a short article in The New Yorker titled “The Cult of Overwork.” In it, James Surowiecki writes: “For decades, junior bankers and Wall Street firms had an unspoken pact: in exchange for reasonably high-paying jobs and a shot at obscene wealth, young analysts agreed to work fifteen hours a day, and forgo anything resembling a normal life.” Reading that, I had a thought. If you’re…

  • The joy of being average (94 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Sam. Sam spent 13 years working in Equities on Wall Street and discusses financial independence strategies on Financial Samurai. Sam is also the founder of the Yakezie Network, the largest personal finance blog network on the web. When I asked the community whether we have the duty to live up to our potential, many of you balked at the notion of living up to anybody else’s standards but your own….

  • Money mythbuster: Women don’t negotiate (35 comments)

    This article is by staff writer April Dykman. On average, women earn less than men for the same job and performance level. Popular thought has been that that’s because women simply don’t ask for more money. Makes sense, right? You have to ask for something in order to receive it. But there’s something about that line of thinking that has never sat well with me. I asked and did not receive During college, I worked…

  • Reader Story: Looking ahead pays off until “boom”! (49 comments)

    This reader story comes from JenB. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want to submit your own reader story? Here’s how. I thought I had it all figured out, but the middle-of-the-night panic attacks have started again as a result of a little piece of mail I received this week….

  • A case for “hard work pays off” (42 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. Over the weekend, a friend of mine came to visit. She’s a career counselor and, while I wasn’t looking for free advice, the conversation naturally turned to my job hunt. “How’s it going?” she asked. “It’s bleak,” I complained. “Oh, I know.” She told me about clients she’s worked with who went on second and third interviews. Those clients were sure they got the job. Then they…

  • On a time crunch? Squeeze more out of your day (50 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Lisa Aberle. When I (or others) want to improve our financial situations, most excuses involve time. I am too busy to take on another job. I don’t have time to start that business I’ve wanted to start for the last three years. I wish I could really get my financial ducks in a row, but I feel like I’m already using every spare minute of my days. While time budgeting and money budgeting…

  • Ask the Readers: Big decisions for 20-somethings (69 comments)

    This question comes from a regular Get Rich Slowly reader who needs some help making some life-changing decisions. She’s reaching out to the GRS readers for some advice. Between the two of us, my then-boyfriend and I had a moderate amount of savings. We had both paid off all of our debt – cars, student loans and all credit cards. We were proud of ourselves and felt ahead of other 26-year-olds we knew. About 25…

  • Anyone can start a side business (47 comments)

    Note: This guest post is from Jim Wang of Microblogger, a blog about entrepreneurship and how Wang built a seven-figure business. For actionable advice on how to build your own business, join his free newsletter. I believe anyone can start a side business that becomes their full-time business. My first job out of college was writing software in the defense industry for Northrop Grumman. Every day I went to my 9-to-5 job, wrote software that…

  • Ask the Readers: How do you handle irregular income? (40 comments)

    This article is by staff writer April Dykman. Those of you who have read GRS for a while know that when I started writing here more than four years ago, I was gainfully employed as a writer-editor-project-manager type. I had a steady paycheck, and every two weeks, I knew exactly how much money would magically appear in my checking account. Two years later, I gave up that predictable paycheck to pursue life working on my own…

  • Student loans: Lessons learned, choosing a major, and overcoming regrets (113 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Holly Johnson. In 2009, Kasey O. graduated college with a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts in Media Arts & Animation. With the support of her family, friends, school guidance counselors, and high school teachers, she had finally earned a college degree in a field that fulfilled her passion. Kasey was proud, hopeful, and ready to begin her dream career. But unfortunately for Kasey, things weren’t exactly what they seemed. What Kasey didn’t…

  • Reader Stories: Youth and exuberance give way (aka my lesson on entitlement) (8 comments)

    This Reader Story comes from Stevie Lutgen, a mortgage content editor for Lender411.com. She has a job now, but still writes for free, just for fun. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want to submit your own reader story? Here’s how. On June 15, 2011, I woke up slightly hung…

  • Coping with job loss (46 comments)

    A few weeks ago, I lost a freelance job. I won’t dish the details, because it’s not relevant to this post, and I’m still friendly with my contacts there. What is relevant to this post, however, is that I’ve had a big change in income. I went from being able to stash away more than enough in retirement and medium-term savings to barely being able to pay my monthly expenses. Today, as I contemplate low-paying gigs…

  • Reader Stories: How we saved one year’s salary in Roth IRAs in grad school (55 comments)

    This reader story is from Emily, a graduate student living in North Carolina who blogs about transitions in young adulthood and living well on less at Evolving Personal Finance. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want to submit your own reader story? Here’s how. My husband, Kyle, and I recently…

  • Ask the Readers: Should you move for work? (35 comments)

    These days, if you’ve got work, you’re among the lucky. And not to be picky, but the sad fact is that even if you have work, there’s a real chance you may be “under-employed” – where you either can’t get enough hours to meet your expenses or the jobs that are available to you are far below your abilities. There are a lot of situations out there: from the long-term unemployed to those who keep…

  • Changing careers: The grass isn’t always greener (76 comments)

    This post is by staff writer Holly Johnson. Earlier this year, my husband and I made a decision that will change the course of our lives, for better or for worse. After 10 years in the mortuary industry, we decided that it was time for my husband to make a change. He was frustrated, burnt out, and tired of working weekends, late nights, and holidays. He began to wonder if there was something else that he…

  • Getting technical: an alternative to traditional college (33 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Lisa Aberle. In 2000, I graduated from my first round of post-secondary education and landed a job. My first annual salary was about 13 times more than my entire education had cost me. It wasn’t that my job paid so well, but that my education had been so inexpensive. Now that my husband and I are parents, we have some decisions to make regarding our children’s education. We, of…

  • Reader Stories: How to earn $391.11 in 16 months and still be OK (38 comments)

    This reader story comes from Joel Zaslofsky, who is offering instant access to download the free tools on his website Value of Simple to help you simplify, organize, and be money wise. When he’s not helping people start investing with $100, enjoying nature, podcasting, or chasing his sons around the house, he’s cranking out useful stuff at Value of Simple. I was so stoked to go from $105,143.56 in annual compensation to $0.00 overnight. This…

  • 4 signs you’re over your job & 5 things you can do about it (27 comments)

    This post is by staff writer Kristin Wong. Over the summer, I read a book that likened a miserable job to hanging onto the edge of a cliff. I thought it was an appropriate analogy. Like most people, I’ve been there, and that’s totally what it feels like. You know you have to let go, but letting go is scary. You could land in a better spot, or you could meet your ruin. The author argued that…

  • Reader Stories: How I paid off $610,000 in debt, became a dad and quit my job — in 2 years (56 comments)

    This reader story comes from John Corcoran, an attorney, former Clinton White House writer and blogger at SmartBusinessRevolution.com, where he writes about how to use smart political strategies in business. You can download his free ebook, “10 Ways to Use Secret Political Strategies and Tactics to Grow Your Business.” Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels…

  • Ask the Readers: What would it take to quit your job and pursue your passion? (86 comments)

    This guest post is from Michelle who blogs at Making Sense of Cents. Lately I have been thinking a lot about whether I should pursue what I love and enjoy my life more, or stick it out with my job that provides stable income. Recently, I was reading a post about how one reader quit her very promising and high-paying career so that she could enjoy life instead. After I read that post, I read about how…

  • Time-management strategies for working parents (45 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Holly Johnson. I am sure you’ve heard the saying, “A mother’s work is never done.” This is especially true for parents who continue working after they’ve had kids. Even after putting in a full day on the job, working parents still have a variety of things that have to be done. In fact, finishing up your day job usually means beginning work on a second wave of responsibilities. If you’re…

  • Reader Stories: Bicycle commuting and frugality (53 comments)

    This is a guest post from Catherine. She is 27 and was born and raised in Minneapolis, Minn. where she resides with her cat, Monty. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and is trying to figure out her career path. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want to submit your own…

  • The high cost of saying ‘no’ (25 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. Before I became a full-time freelancer, I worked in the communications department at a large non-profit. The organization hosted several events every year, from small local workshops to huge statewide conferences, and we always needed to fill some holes in the event schedule. This was never easy. Many times it was on my department to come up with extra presentations. That meant that my three bosses always…

  • Should you ever work for free? (42 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sarah Gilbert. I lose count of my “jobs” these days: my literary writing (that theoretically pays, or had better one day or else), a nonprofit board on which I serve as president, and the magazine I started last summer. While I certainly put the same intensity into everything, I can definitely say that I work more hours for free than I do for pay. So when I got the advice from a…

  • Career strategies of high earners (36 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Kristin Wong. I mentioned in my last post that I read Barbara Stanny’s “Secrets of Six-Figure Women.” Stanny interviewed 150 women who earn more than $100,000 annually and sought to find what traits, experiences and motivators they shared in common. Unlike most books, this one didn’t take me three months to finish. It’s a fast read, and I think that has a lot to do with how relatable it is. I’m not saying I…

  • Investing in professional conferences (21 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sarah Gilbert. I am writing this after the third weekend in a row of attending professional conferences. While I wouldn’t suggest such a schedule (it was a fluke of the calendar I hope won’t ever happen again!), I came away from the experience renewed with the belief that, no matter what your field, attending conferences — given the usual caveat that moderation in all things is important — is an…

  • 9 traits of underearners (75 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Kristin Wong. I just read Barbara Stanny’s “Secrets of Six-Figure Women.” I was happy to find that I share similar traits to the 150 women she interviewed. But there was a section that stood out to me, mostly because I didn’t expect it to stand out to me. We previously reviewed Stanny’s book “Overcoming Underearing.” Guest reviewer Jeremy M. wrote: “[Stanny] learned that the big difference between highly successful…

  • The cost of workaholism (66 comments)

    “What are your resolutions this year?” a girlfriend recently asked me. I thought about the areas of my life I’d like to improve upon and responded, “I’d like to work less. I think I’m a workaholic.” She paused for a bit then hesitantly said, “…that doesn’t sound like a problem…” And indeed, when I’d talked about this with my mom just a week earlier, she said, “That’s a good addiction.” But it’s easy to confuse hard work…

  • I’m off to grow a giant pumpkin! (30 comments)

    This post is from staff writer El Nerdo. I love my job, but my job doesn’t pay so well. For a while I attempted to cope with this problem by means of personal finance. However, while thinking and writing about personal finance, I have realized (for a while now) that I need to make more money. And while personal finance is more of a subset of home economics, earning more is all about business and entrepreneurship,…

  • Negotiating for perks when raises are off the table (21 comments)

    This guest post is from David Lye. David is an expert on novated leasing, which is a “company car” type perk that many Australian companies offer their employees. In today’s uncertain economy, many employers are reluctant to offer raises to their employees. You may be lucky enough to keep your job, but chances are that you may not get a raise, or if you do, it could be a very small raise. However, if you’re…

  • A scholarship for small-business folks (12 comments)

    With student debt now topping credit card debt (see page 3 of the PDF), every penny that you can find to put toward education is wanted. We hear a lot about student loans, but not so much about scholarships as a way to pay for education. There are all kinds of scholarships, often sponsored by special-interest groups. Here are a few that Mark Kantrowitz of Finaid.org lists on his site: Scholarship for Left-Handed Students, Little…

  • Planning for a new financial paradigm (58 comments)

    I’d tried and occasionally gotten by on very much less, and I’d shuffled small freelance gigs and guiltily spent windfalls instead of saving. But I just couldn’t figure out a long-term way to make my rather meager freelance income work for all my non-household-bill expenses; food, child care, coffee shop goodies, lunches for my boys, the limited-but-still-precious entertainment expenditures, home office costs, clothes, and the rest of it. I was considering finding some more small…

  • Throwing away an old rule (74 comments)

    Fellow peasants, unite! The time has come to overthrow the old order! GRS rule #3 says, “Spend less than you earn.” But why should we continue to do that always? Because of tradition? Because of authority? Because that’s what everyone else claims they are doing? To the guillotine with the old rules, I say. It’s time for revolution! It’s time to turn the old laws upside down. It’s time to say something better. It’s time…

  • Workplace gratitude: A simple way to boost your ‘income-producing ability’ (79 comments)

    I watch a lot of  “House Hunters.” It’s mostly mindless TV, but I have learned a few things. One of those things is that, in Japan, renters pay their landlords something called “key money.” Key money is, in essence, money you pay your landlord for providing you with a place to stay. After some cursory research, I read that it’s a throwback from World War II, when housing was scarce, and, in other cultures, it’s…

  • Make more money as a subject matter expert (33 comments)

    I spend a lot of time working. I have my day job, first of all. I also have a demanding side hustle in addition to writing here. I’ve spent most of my working life like this. I like working and learning something new, but the main reason I seek employment is because making more money gives me choices. I can pay off debt, save for home improvement projects or add to our retirement accounts. As…

  • In defense of passion (with the help of reason) (81 comments)

    “Nothing great in the world has ever been accomplished without passion.” -Hegel Last week, GRS published an article by April Dykman that presented some ideas by Ramit Sethi and Cal Newport about how “follow your passion” is bad career advice and what to do about it. Sure, I guess. “Follow your passion” is bad advice. For one thing, it’s terribly simplistic. It also assumes that everyone has a passion or even knows what that is….

  • Why “follow your passion” is bad advice, and what to do instead (42 comments)

    Jennifer didn’t know what she wanted to be when she grew up. “I did hours upon hours of research into different fields I thought I might be interested in,” she says. “I thought I might want to do supply-chain management, but I wanted to have hours where I could be home to cook and clean and be the stereotypical housewife.” Finally, she decided to become a financial adviser. “I realized that working one on one…

  • Ask the Readers: Is traditional advice killing your job search? (25 comments)

    “Vince” was halfway through his MBA program and struggling to find an internship. So, he took his career counselor’s advice and blasted his resume and cover letter to 30 companies.”I just tried to shoot out as many resumes as possible,” says Vince. Nine companies called him back, but the interviews didn’t go well. He only got one offer, and it wasn’t for a particularly great internship. If Vince followed his career counselor’s advice, why was…

  • The power of personal networks (40 comments)

    This post is by staff writer Honey Smith. While I believe that focusing on your day job generally has the possibility for greater payoffs than side gigs, I am currently under-earning based on my education and experience. I do keep an eye out for positions that would enable me to advance in my main career. However, in the meantime I have also been making a conscious effort to seek out freelance opportunities. In order to keep…

  • Lessons from a master (53 comments)

    I have been re-watching the documentary “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” for the past couple of months. I’ve seen it at least 10 times, probably more, while writing drafts for this article. I’ve watched it alone, with my wife, with friends, and I don’t tire of it; I’ve recommended it to everyone I know, and now I’m wholeheartedly recommending it to you. This little gem of a documentary by David Gelb takes a look at the…

  • Safeguarding your career switch (44 comments)

    The night before I moved to California, I got a flat tire. The day before I moved to California, someone backed into my car. The first night that I moved to California, I got a parking ticket and my car was towed. So, you know. I was really beginning to question my move to California. I switched careers in 2010. It’d always been a dream of mine to move to New York or Los Angeles…

  • Ask the Readers: What is your most pressing financial issue? (98 comments)

    As Election Day draws (mercifully) near, that old question “Are you better off than you were four years ago?” comes up again and again. I’m not going to talk politics. However, I think the better question at any time (and one that is worth asking a few times a year) might be “What is your most pressing financial issue?” Facing foreclosure? Deep in credit card debt? Shopping for health insurance? Lost your job? Can’t make…

  • Earning more vs. spending less: The decision (89 comments)

    This is the last article in a series. Here are round 1, round 2, and round 3. The need to specialize I have been wrestling now for some time with the question of where to focus one’s energies: whether to earn more or whether to save more. Of course you want to do both, but to get really good at something it takes time, effort, patience and dedication — just like anything you want to…

  • Should you be a generalist or a specialist? (67 comments)

    Way back in 2009, I read a blog post on whether you should be a generalist or a specialist. Sure, the post’s focus was on freelance commercial writing, but every now and then, I would think about its premise: Can you earn more as a generalist or a specialist in a certain career field? Do generalist careers or specialist careers earn more overall? Is it easier for a generalist to be hired? Or does a…

  • Reader Story: From recession to best financial shape of my life (53 comments)

    This guest post from William Cowie is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. William has contributed to ConsumerismCommentary.com, BudgetsAreSexy.com and other personal finance blogs. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want submit your own reader story? Here’s how. Fresh out of college in South Africa in…

  • Ask the Readers: If parents are paying for college, are any majors off limits? (257 comments)

    This is a guest post from Jacqueline Whiton, who self-financed her undergraduate education and MBA. She is interested in personal finance and is saving to fund her three teenagers’ anticipated college expenses. After saving since your child was in preschool, you celebrate euphorically when your son or daughter is accepted to the college of his or her choice. You’d always imagined that your math whiz would become a chief financial officer (CFO), but are surprised…

  • Side Gigs v. Day Jobs (132 comments)

    This post is from new staff writer Honey Smith. If you’re in debt — especially if you’re in significant debt — frugality will only get you so far. To really make a dent, you have to increase your income. The option recommended most frequently on personal finance blogs I have read is freelancing or consulting on the side. Another option is a second job (usually hourly work of some kind). However, side jobs aren’t always…

  • Stop Being the Person You Think You Are (100 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer Donna Freedman. Donna writes the Frugal Cool blog for MSN Money, and writes about frugality and intentional living at Surviving And Thriving. How’s your life going? Do dark nights of the soul outweigh the good days? Have you spent more time than you care to acknowledge wishing for something – anything – other than what you have? Get over it. It’s not that simple, obviously. But in order…

  • What Matters in Matters of Love and Finance (166 comments)

    “You need to keep your skills fresh,” said a commenter in a recent post about the finances of parenting, referring to the concept of a mother staying at home with the kids. “In case of death or divorce. I didn’t argue, but I shook my head and rolled my eyes. (I do this to avoid leaving snappy replies to people’s comments. Work with me.) I’ve long felt that combining one’s finances with a potential, or…

  • A Lifetime of Work (78 comments)

    Note: This article is a reprint (with some edits and additions). Several readers have suggested that one way for Get Rich Slowly to retain my voice although I’m no longer a regular contributor is to re-publish old articles like this. I agree, especially for holiday weekends like this one! Get Rich Slowly will resume its regular schedule on Tuesday. It’s Labor Day weekend in the United States, the holiday that traditionally marks the end of…

  • Reader Story: I Asked for a Raise — and Got It! (71 comments)

    This guest post from Robin is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. It’s a follow up to her June story about the real cost of work. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want submit your own reader story? Here’s how. Recently I submitted a reader story about…

  • How Much Is Your Time Worth? (89 comments)

    This is a guest post by Joel Runyon of Impossible HQ. Did you see the Justin Timberlake thriller In Time last year? Probably not. Nobody else did either. Well, I did, I guess. And while the movie wasn’t very good, it contained an interesting idea that I think relates to personal finance. The movie’s plot revolves around a world where everyone is genetically engineered to live until they’re 25. After that, they have exactly one…

  • Can’t Get a Job? Get a Microjob! (74 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer Donna Freedman. Donna writes the Frugal Cool blog for MSN Money, and writes about frugality and intentional living at Surviving And Thriving. Looking for work? Somebody out there wants you to design websites, board dogs, run errands, write blot posts, do laundry, deliver packages, be a virtual assistant. Sites like eLance, TaskRabbit, Fiverr, 99designs and 3to30.com are virtual employment offices offering gigs you can pick up and put…

  • Reader Story: Getting Off Track (73 comments)

    This guest post from Nicholas is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want submit your own reader story? Here’s how. I was on on track, chugging along full steam ahead, barreling down on the American Dream with nothing in my path:…

  • Lost on the Career Path (89 comments)

    For the next week (or two), we’ll be sharing “audition” pieces from folks interested in being new staff writers at Get Rich Slowly. Your job is to let us know what you think of each of these writers. Pay attention, give feedback, and after a couple of weeks we’ll ask which writers you prefer. This article is from Elizabeth Falwell. Her first audition piece was about what your loose change is really worth. I opened…

  • Nobody Has It All: Careers We Can Believe In (189 comments)

    This post is by staff writer Sarah Gilbert. By now, lots and lots of people know that Anne-Marie Slaughter doesn’t have it all. Even though she was extremely high-powered, as Director of Policy Planning for the U.S. State Department under Hillary Clinton for two years, she was not a perfect mom during that time, getting on a train to Washington, D.C. each Monday morning at 5:30 a.m. and returning home late Friday night. Her teenage…

  • The Value of Human Capital (33 comments)

    For the next week (or two), we’ll be sharing “audition” pieces from folks interested in being new staff writers at Get Rich Slowly. Your job is to let us know what you think of each of these writers. Pay attention, give feedback, and after a couple of weeks we’ll ask which writers you prefer. This article is from Will Crosswell, who says he’s a young guy who’s made some dumb moves financially. But he wants…

  • Reader Story: The Real Cost of Work (94 comments)

    This guest post from Robin is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want submit your own reader story? Here’s how. A few weeks ago, J.D. wrote about how sometimes he feels like a monkey dancing for money. After reading his story,…

  • Are You Afraid to Earn More? (137 comments)

    This is a guest post from Rya Hristova. Rya had her reader story featured at Get Rich Slowly last year. She writes a Bulgarian personal-finance blog called kadebg.com. Did you grow up in a modest family? Walking to school or taking the bus instead of having your own car? Wearing clothes your siblings have grown out of, instead of getting designer clothes? Always trying to make do or do without? And now in your adult…

  • Burgers or Blogging? Further Thoughts on Pursuing Your Passion (93 comments)

    Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve been exploring the nature of work at Get Rich Slowly. What does it mean to pursue your passion? Is passion what work should be about? Or is a job just a source of income? For me, there’s no right answer. Right now, yes, I’m pursuing my passion, and I love it. As a full-time writer working from home, I’m doing work I’ve always wanted to do, and I…

  • Reader Story: I Quit My Passion and Took a Boring Job (227 comments)

    This guest post from long-time GRS reader Knot Theory is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. I’m a consumer of the personal finance blogosphere as much as anyone. I support the efforts of J.D. and others who…

  • Reader Story: Re-Evaluating the Rat Race (167 comments)

    This guest post from Joe is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. Over the last year, some of my friends have left their day jobs to become a full-time bloggers. Their stories are inspirational, but their choice…

  • How to Negotiate Your Salary (72 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. One of my goals for GRS in 2012 is to write more about earning money. I quit my job a year-and-a-half ago to become self-employed, but I know that most people are employees, and I’m the last person who would suggest that everyone should quit their jobs and become full-time freelancers. For one thing, it’s not right for everyone. It can be lonely, and it doesn’t come…

  • Career Moves: How to Win the Office Politics Game (Part Two) (21 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. Last week we talked about the whys of office politics. Why do they exist? Why do we have to play the game? Today we’ll get to the good stuff: How to run a positive campaign and how to deal with the Negative Neds and Nancys in your work life. (No offense intended if your name is Ned or Nancy — I’m sure you’re lovely.) Running a good…

  • Career Moves: How to Win the Office Politics Game (Part One) (47 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. “Office politics” is one of those phrases that used to make me groan. I worked in an office from the time I was a freshman in college until I quit my job last year, and let me tell you, I had my fill. I dealt with situations that would make our presidential candidates wince, and I tried many approaches to deal with it, such as pretending to…

  • How to Know When to Quit (62 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. Before I became a full-time freelancer, I worked for a couple of different companies. Both times I started a new job, it started out exciting and fun. Great benefits! Cool perks! Interesting work! After a year or two, it got harder to get up in the morning and face an eight-hour day of doing whatever it was I was hired to do. By years three to five,…

  • How to Ask for a Raise in a Bad Job Market (40 comments)

    This is a guest post by Alexandra Levit, a formerly nationally syndicated columnist for the Wall Street Journal, and Money Magazine’s Online Career Expert of the Year. Levit works with organizations as diverse as the Obama administration and Microsoft, and has written the new book Blind Spots: The 10 Business Myths You Can’t Afford to Believe on Your New Path to Success, which is all about getting ahead in a difficult job market and stressful…

  • 10 Career Lessons from Julia Child (51 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman, who believes lavender, chocolate, and honey are the stuff that dreams are made of. Readers, I hope you’ll forgive me for writing another culinary-themed post here at Get Rich Slowly. Last week I wrote about the expense of healthy food cooked at home, and this week I can’t help but to talk about something that’s been on my mind as I’ve read My Life In France by…

  • Why Leaving My Job in Finance Was the Best Decision Ever (40 comments)

    This is a guest post from Sean Ogle, a former portfolio analyst who is now pursuing his goals of starting a business and seeing the world. Ogle writes about travel and entrepreneurship at Location 180. He also helps people build small businesses they can run from anywhere on earth at Location Rebel. This is my third guest post at Get Rich Slowly. The responses from my first two stories — Budgeting for a Lifestyle Change…

  • On the Road to Nowhere: The True Story of My First (and Worst) Job (67 comments)

    It’s Labor Day in the United States, the holiday that traditionally marks the end of summer and the beginning of the new school year. Officially, it’s intended as “a day off for the working citizens”. As usual, GRS is taking a short break. This is a reprint of a column from five years ago. Your job is one of your most important assets. It gives you earning power. It can bring you personal fulfillment. But…

  • Reader Story: Taking a Risk, Reaping the Rewards (44 comments)

    This guest post from Maggie is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. A year ago, my husband was unemployed. We were living far from our families, and dealing as best we could with a massive amount…

  • Playing to Your Strengths (52 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and raising children at Childwild.com. Shortly after finishing college, a friend of mine was fired from his first job. He kept showing up to work late — sometimes hours late. He was charming and smart and reasonably good at his work, but his employer just couldn’t rely on him to be at his desk on time, so they let him go….

  • Hourly vs. Salary: Which is Better? (160 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. I had a conversation with a friend, we’ll call him Joel, who had two job offers. One was a low-stress 9-to-5 gig, but paid $10,000 less than the other offer, which would require longer hours and greater responsibility. He didn’t like a lot of things about the higher paying position, but he accepted the offer because it was more in line with the salary at his last…

  • Ask the Readers: How Can I Handle “Required” Office Spending? (215 comments)

    “Money is more about mind than it is about math.” — That’s one of the fifteen tenets of the Get Rich Slowly philosophy. By this I mean that psychology and emotion and relationships play a bigger part in our financial choices than the pure mathematics of any given situation. This manifests itself in lots of ways. Sometimes, it even crops up in the workplace. A reader we’ll call Erin wrote recently with the following dilemma:…

  • Five Career Moves with Exponential Returns (62 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. One of my favorite topics to write about is ways to earn more money, though I don’t often cover it here at GRS. As most regular readers know, last summer I quit my day job to work full-time as a freelance writer. Financially and personally, it was the best decision I’ve ever made. Nevertheless, there are a significant number of GRS readers who have no interest in…

  • Reader Story: I’m a Sugar Mama (and Proud of It!) (127 comments)

    This guest post from Kerry is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. Hello. My name is Kerry. I’m 26, and I’m the sole provider in my household — and have been for the last three…

  • How I Earn My Money (73 comments)

    A lot of what we write here at Get Rich Slowly is theoretical. “This is how you should do things,” we say. Or, sometimes, the articles are meant for inspiration: “Here are some great ideas for taking control of your finances!” We don’t write as often about the things we actually do with our own money. In the early days of the site, I shared many of my own experiences. I’ve gotten away from that…

  • Follow-Up: Taking a 20% Pay Cut (32 comments)

    I get a lot of requests for follow-ups to reader stories and reader questions. People want to hear how things turned out. Because I want to know how things turned out, too, I’ve started a semi-regular feature at Get Rich Slowly. Whenever I hear back from a previous poster, I’ll share an update so that we can all know what happened. Tim Stobbs wrote in September of 2010 to explain why he loved his 20%…

  • Jump-Start Your Career With a Personal Business Model (10 comments)

    This is a guest post from Tim Clark, an entrepreneur, teacher, and the author or editor of five books on entrepreneurship, personal development, and business models, including the international bestseller Business Model Generation and the forthcoming Business Model You. Clark has shared several guest posts here in the past, on topics like making the most of opportunity, how to decide if you should become an entrepreneur, and more. Clark is also one of my real-life…

  • Studs Terkel’s Working (22 comments)

    A couple of weeks ago, I shared an instructional video from 1948 called

  • What To Do with an Old 401(k) (68 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and getting her kids to eat kale at Childwild.com. When a friend of mine changed jobs recently, she discovered she had half a dozen old 401(k)s trailing her from her past jobs. She wanted to get on top of her financial planning, but wasn’t sure what to do with all those old investments. she asked me for advice. Truth is, I…

  • You and Your Work: A Short Film About Employment from 1948 (38 comments)

    Last weekend, Kris and I hired a friend’s 12-year-old to help with yardwork. We leave for Africa on Monday, and we don’t want to burden our housesitter with unnecessary chores. When we heard that our young friend Ian was raising money for a school trip to Washington D.C., we figured that instead of buying candy bars from him, we’d offer $10 an hour to help us around the house. Ian and I spent six hours…

  • The Importance of Salary Negotiation (76 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and getting her kids to eat kale at Childwild.com. I have a good friend who recently graduated from MIT with a PhD in something I can’t even pronounce, let alone do. Even in this rocky economy, he has competing job offers. That’s a great position to be in, and I’m happy for him. But when he told me about his options,…

  • On the Value of Networking (56 comments)

    It’s hard to believe, but Kris and I graduated from Willamette University nearly twenty years ago. We enjoyed our time in college, and remain close to many of our classmates. It’s always fun when we get a chance to drive to Salem to re-visit the campus. We did just that tonight. The university hosted a “You’re Doing What With Your Major?” alumni career panel to connect current students with former Bearcats who are now working…

  • Living Like a Millionaire on Pennies a Day (41 comments)

    This is a guest post from Sean Ogle, a former portfolio analyst who is now pursuing his goals of starting a business and seeing the world. You can read more from him at Location180. You can also follow him on twitter @seanogle. Last fall, I quit my job. As nice as it was to have a steady paycheck and the prestige of being known as a “portfolio analyst”, there was one key component that was…

  • Career Insurance: Insuring Your Most Valuable Asset (14 comments)

    The following is a guest post from FMF at Free Money Finance. If you’d like daily tips, thoughts, and suggestions on how to grow your net worth, subscribe to Free Money Finance for free by clicking this link. For most people, their career is their most valuable financial asset. Nothing else they own is likely worth as much (several million dollars over a lifetime). And even if they do have something more valuable (like an…

  • How to Maximize Your Salary (48 comments)

    This guest post comes from Kimberly Palmer, author of Generation Earn: The Young Professional’s Guide to Spending, Investing, and Giving Back, which hits bookstores today. She’s also the Alpha Consumer blogger at USNews.com. Every time I’ve ever gotten close to a job offer, my Dad sits me down for a little practice negotiation session. He acts like my potential employer, and I act like myself. The conversation usually goes something like this: Dad: “Kim, we…

  • The War on Work (129 comments)

    I write a lot at Get Rich Slowly about Financial Independence, by which I essentially mean early retirement (or semi-retirement). That is, accumulating enough money that I no longer have to work. To me, escape from work has always seemed like the ultimate goal. This is probably because my father held out retirement as a sort of Promised Land. He worked hard — if not always effectively — and he always made retirement and the…

  • Reader Story: Working for Uncle Sam Overseas (58 comments)

    This guest post from Mike is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. Traveling to exotic new places is a passion of mine. My wife reminisces fondly over a dinner conversation we had about nine years ago…

  • Growing Your Human Capital: 11 Ways to Boost Your Income-Producing Ability (34 comments)

    This is a guest post from Robert Brokamp of The Motley Fool. Robert is a Certified Financial Planner and the adviser for The Motley Fool’s Rule Your Retirement service. He contributes one new article to Get Rich Slowly every two weeks. Unless your last name is Rockefeller, Hilton, or Walton (as in Sam Walton, founder of Wal-Mart — four of the seven richest Americans are Sam’s heirs) chances are you had to work for the…

  • Reader Story: I Got a 20% Pay Cut — and Loved It! (61 comments)

    This guest post from Tim Stobbs is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. Tim Stobbs is the writer behind the blog, Canadian Dream: Free at 45. He lives in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada and despite his recent…

  • Ask the Readers: How Do I Survive Until I Get My First Paycheck? (95 comments)

    Isaac wrote recently with a question about how to make the transition from college to the Real World. He has a good degree, but it’ll take him time to find a job, especially since the economy is still sluggish. He’s worried about how he should handle is finances in the meantime. Here’s his question: I recently graduated from college with a degree in electrical engineering. I’m currently living at home with my family while I…

  • Reader Story: I Was a TV Freelancer (or Financial Planning and Job Instability) (38 comments)

    This guest post from Kristen Swensson is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. It’s also the funniest post I’ve published since Robert Brokamp’s last appearance. Swensson is the proprietor of Cheap Healthy Good, a great blog about food and frugality. She likes nothing more than good feedback and bacon, preferably combined in a delicious slurry. A long, long time ago (2009) in a galaxy far, far away (New York City), I…

  • Is It Time To Quit Your Day Job? (96 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and getting her kids to eat kale at Childwild.com. (It’s also her birthday today.) Who doesn’t dream of quitting their day job? Every day, countless hours are spent in corporate cubicles daydreaming about lives of adventure, creativity, and play — lives spent doing what you love. Last month, I took the leap. I quit my day job to write full time….

  • Taking Care of Business: Expense Reimbursement (50 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer April Dykman. Most employees have to submit expense reports at some point — be it for out-of-town travel, client dinners, special events, or other expenses you incur due to your job responsibilities. Keeping track of these expenses is important, otherwise you’re losing money while on the job and probably not endearing yourself to your company’s finance department, which relies on accurate records and timely reports from employees. It…

  • Let’s All Find Awesome Jobs (32 comments)

    In one recent interview, a reporter made a comment about my book reviews. “I read several of them, and they all seem to be positive,” she said. “Do you like every book you read?” No, of course not. In fact, my friends would tell you that I’m generally pretty critical of the stuff I read. However, I don’t see the point of reviewing books I hate. Better to ignore them and focus only on the…

  • Have a Financial Health Day…at Work (27 comments)

    This is a guest post from Robert Brokamp of The Motley Fool. Robert is a Certified Financial Planner and the adviser for The Motley Fool’s Rule Your Retirement service. He contributes one new article to Get Rich Slowly every two weeks. Once a month, a small group of folks at The Motley Fool gather to discuss money-saving ideas and exchange tips and tricks. Last fall, we members of the Personal Finance Club (as we boringly…

  • 9 Sneaky Expenses That Eat Away at Your Income (58 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Adam Baker. Baker is a founding member of Untemplater.com, a new multi-author blog focusing on personal finance, entrepreneurship, and life design for people in their 20′s and 30′s. Few concepts have had as great an impact on my family’s financial decision-making as learning how to calculate our real hourly wage. The concept was introduced by (or at least popularized by) the amazing book, Your Money or Your Life. This book…

  • Invest in Your Most Important Income-Producing Asset (18 comments)

    This is a guest post from Robert Brokamp of The Motley Fool. Robert is a Certified Financial Planner and the advisor for The Motley Fool’s Rule Your Retirement service. He contributes one new article to Get Rich Slowly every two weeks. Your net worth is based not only on how much moolah you have in the bank, but also on your human capital — that is, your ability to earn income. “We can think of…

  • New Job, New You (41 comments)

    I spent 17 years working at a job I hated, afraid to pursue my passions. I’ve spent the past two years doing something I love, and the difference in my attitude is like night and day. Some folks take the position that a job is just a job, that it’s not meant to be enjoyed, but merely to provide an income. I’m not one of these people. Neither is Alexandra Levit. In her new book,…

  • Job Loss: Got a Financial Game Plan? (63 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer April Dykman. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of unemployed was 15.4 million and the jobless rate was 10 percent in November. While those numbers “edged down” from previous months, there’s no doubt that job loss and unemployment are hot topics, and people are worried. Some of those lucky enough to hang onto their jobs have experienced salary reductions, reduced hours, or withheld bonuses. Even if your…

  • Reader Story: Budgeting For a Lifestyle Change (41 comments)

    This is a guest post from Sean Ogle, a former portfolio analyst who is now pursuing his goals of starting a business and seeing the world. You can read more from him at Location180. You can also follow him on twitter @seanogle.  Have you ever thought about doing something different with your life? Maybe you’ve decided that you’d like to do more world traveling. Perhaps you want to explore that entrepreneurial idea that has always…

  • Ask the Readers: What If Your High-Paying Job Makes You Miserable? (109 comments)

    On Thursday, I featured a guest post from Free Money Finance that proved to be surprisingly controversial. His five steps to six figures in seven years offered solid common-sense career advice for those looking to boost their incomes. Many readers disliked the post. (Though they didn’t hate it as much as FMF’s previous guest article.) Though I don’t share all of your complaints, I do think some of you made an excellent point: Just as…

  • Five Steps to Six Figures in Seven Years (143 comments)

    This is a guest post from FMF at Free Money Finance, a personal finance blog designed to help you grow your net worth. You can subscribe to Free Money Finance here. Historically, “making six figures” has been to income earners what “becoming a millionaire” has been for those tracking their net worths — a lofty goal achieved by only a select few. And while neither a six-figure earner nor a millionaire can bask in the…

  • Crush It! and The Best Books on Boosting Your Income (28 comments)

    Yesterday, I argued that the most effective path to financial success is to boost your income. Frugality is an important part of personal finance, and you will eventually meet your goals if you simply cut your spending, but it might take you a very long time. Maybe even decades. To super-charge your savings, I believe you should look for ways to increase your income. Unfortunately, it’s not as easy to give advice about increasing income…

  • The Personal Finance Hour, Episode 21: Job-Hunting Skills (3 comments)

    On this week’s installment of The Personal Finance Hour, Jim and I spent the hour talking with Michael Hampton, the director of Career Development at Western Oregon University. (We also had a lively parallel chatroom discussion this week.) Network, network, network Our discussion stressed the importance of networking. Hampton notes that your résumé isn’t your primary tool in landing a job; it’s a supporting document. You want to sell yourself by other methods and use…

  • 5 Ways To Rescue Your Rotten Résumé (33 comments)

    This is a guest post from Kerry K. Taylor, author of Squawkfox, a blog where frugal living is fun. On today’s episode of The Personal Finance Hour, Jim and I will be discussing job-hunting skills. First, though, here’s Kerry’s advice about résumés. If you’re anything like my friends, your résumé is probably a little stale and perhaps a lot rotten. I’m sure your skills are not rotten and don’t deserve to be trashed as rubbish….

  • What’s the Difference Between High-Income Earners and Low-Income Earners? (232 comments)

    In June, a user at Ask Metafilter wondered: What are the differences between someone who makes $100,000/year and someone who makes $30,000? As you might expect, this question generated a lot of discussion — all of it interesting. Many commenters noted that, from their experience, high-income earners generally exhibited several of the following traits: They maintain a strong work ethic. They don’t watch the clock. They seek to improve their skills. They do quality work….

  • What is the Value of a College Education? (156 comments)

    This is a guest post from Jason Barr, who writes about personal development at Start Being Your Best. Jason is a potential Staff Writer for Get Rich Slowly. His first post described what he learned from failure. Jason is 32 years old, has been married for seven years, and has a 2-1/2 year old son. He’s now a financial analyst, but he spent five years in the army as a Chinese linguist. What is the…

  • Employee or Entrepreneur? The Pros and Cons of Self-Employment (114 comments)

    In my recent review of Pam Slim’s Escape from Cubicle Nation, Chett left the following comment: I was talking with a good friend last week who is self-employed. I told him I envied his entrepreneurial spirit and the ability to “go it alone.” He told me he envied my work as a teacher and the set hours and guaranteed pay check and insurance. (I told him there was nothing “set” about the hours, so I…

  • Escape from Cubicle Nation (35 comments)

    Last Friday, I attended a workshop put on by Pamela Slim, who writes about entrepreneurship at Escape from Cubicle Nation. Before this meeting, I didn’t know much about Slim or her message, but her work came highly recommended from my friend, Chris Guillebeau. “Pam is the real deal,” he told me. “Her book is what a lot other books have tried to be.” Based on this recommendation, I drove to hear Slim speak. I was…

  • How to Nail an Interview: 20 Job Interview Tips (37 comments)

    After writing about how to negotiate your salary recently, a couple of readers pointed me to another job-related tool on the web. Steinar Skipsness has created a microsite called How to Nail an Interview. Here’s how he describes it: What is it that certain people say or do during a job interview that makes them stand out? Why do some people struggle to find work, while others land a job in no time? I wanted…

  • Starting a Business After a Job Loss (25 comments)

    This is a guest post from Matt, a long-time GRS reader. After earning a master’s degree in electrical engineering, my father joined a large technology company where he did quite well for himself. The company transferred him twice, requiring him to pick up and move his newly-created family across the country. Then he was laid off. Vowing never to let this happen again, he leveraged his network to recruit good people for a new electrical…

  • Negotiating Your Salary: How to Make $1,000 a Minute (55 comments)

    Most personal-finance blogs write about cutting expenses. But you can obtain powerful results by looking beyond frugality, by boosting your earning power. One of the best ways to increase your income is at the source: during salary negotiations, either when you land a job or during a performance review. This can be scary. For many people, salary negotiations are an awkward thing. I was discussing this subject recently with my friend Michael, who runs the…

  • Ask the Readers: Help! I’ve Been Laid Off! (109 comments)

    In December, I shared a guest post that provided 10 essential steps to take before you’re laid off. But what if it’s too late? What if you’ve already lost your job? In this economy, more and more people are facing that situation, including long-time GRS reader Allen. He writes: I was laid off yesterday. If it weren’t for Get Rich Slowly, I wouldn’t have any money set aside. As it is, I have a small…

  • Finding a Good Job in a Bad Economy (73 comments)

    Plonkee, my colleague from “across the pond”, e-mailed me recently with a question about the recession. She wonders what job prospects are like for recent (or soon-to-be) college graduates. Unfortunately, with unemployment at its highest rate in a generation, prospects are not good. And those who are unhappy in their current positions are reluctant to quit because they’re afraid they won’t be able to find a replacement. Last week, for example, Jill shared the following…

  • “Do What You Love” — And Other Career Advice (43 comments)

    On Tuesday, I spoke to students at Western Oregon University about the transition from college to the “real world”. I attended this same event last year, so knew going in that it would be interesting to hear what the other presenters had to say. I spoke about personal finance; they spoke about finding a job and finding meaning. I took notes. Here’s the career advice offered by the six speakers: Ron Theisen The first speaker…

  • Book Review: Overcoming Underearning (15 comments)

    This is a guest post from Jeremy M, who writes about experiencing a full life at Lucid Living. When I asked GRS readers recently which books they’d like to see revieweed here, Overcoming Underearning was near the top of the list. Jeremy volunteered to review it, so I sent him a copy! Barbara Stanny’s Overcoming Underearning is not what I expected it to be. When I read the title, I expected a book about how…

  • Ask the Readers: Is It Unethical to Work a Second Job? (212 comments)

    To build wealth — or to get out of debt — you must create a positive cash flow. That is, you must spend less than you earn. One way to do this is to cut costs. Another is to increase your income. Because it has worked so well in my own life, I encourage people to boost their income whenever possible: ask for a raise, make money from hobbies, change careers. For many, the most…

  • Career Renegade: Make a Living Doing What You Love (18 comments)

    “You don’t have to be world-class great to make a great living doing what you love,” Jonathan Fields writes in Career Renegade, “if you are willing to step outside the box, approach your passion differently, find innovative ways to mine that passion for money, and work like crazy to make it happen.” In Career Renegade, Fields draws upon his own experience, as well as that of others, to provide a blueprint for those willing to…

  • 10 Essential Steps to Take BEFORE You’re Laid Off (94 comments)

    This is a guest post from Kevin Merritt, founder and CEO of blist, a web-based list-sharing and database application. As a nation we have enjoyed relatively low unemployment for the last five years. At the end of 2007 the unemployment rate stood at 4.6%. By comparison, the U.S. unemployment rate peaked at 24.9% in 1933, during the darkest year of the Great Depression. In October of this year the unemployment rate grew 0.4% to 6.5%,…

  • Living with and Learning from Layoffs (48 comments)

    Earlier today, I shared several lists of recession-proof jobs. The experts who created these lists don’t agree on much, but they do seem to think that both jobs in IT and the health-care industry are fairly safe. That doesn’t mean that all of these jobs are safe, of course. I have two friends who combine both of these: they’re IT workers for health insurance providers. One of my friends still has his job. The other…

  • The Best Recession-Proof Jobs (114 comments)

    In The Little Book of Bull Moves in Bear Markets (which I recently reviewed), author Peter Schiff provides a list of the best jobs to beat the economic collapse he predicts is just around the corner. “I foresee the following as the 10 strongest professions and industries over the coming decade and beyond,” he writes. His list: Engineering, because the abandoned U.S. industrial base will need to be re-tooled. Construction, to rebuild the American infrastructure….

  • Working from Home: What I’ve Learned in 8 Months as a Professional Blogger (41 comments)

    The internet is the new El Dorado, a mythical land of gold and plenty. Some savvy marketers have convinced their followers that it’s easy to make money online. It’s not. Just like anything else, it takes work. To be successful, it takes a lot of work. I’ve been working from home as a full-time blogger for eight months now. I love what I do. I love to write. It’s tremendously fulfilling to be make a…

  • Ask the Readers: Best Part-Time Holiday Jobs? (77 comments)

    Christmas is approaching, and with it come seasonal jobs. For some, these can be a great way to earn extra cash, which can be used to purchase gifts, to pay off debt, or simply to save for the future. Kathy recently sent a question asking which part-time holiday jobs are best: I am currently employed full time as an electrical engineer making a decent amount of money, but with the holiday season coming up, I…

  • Beyond “Real Hourly Wage”: How Much Time Does Stuff Actually Cost? (35 comments)

    In my last post, I explained how to compute your real hourly wage, a notion popularized by the book Your Money or Your Life. Authors Joe Dominguez and Vicki Robin encourage readers to calculate their real hourly wage to gain insight into how much time and energy things cost. To do this, you must subtract your annual work-related expenses from your annual income, and then divide the total by the number of hours you spend…

  • How to Compute Your REAL Hourly Wage (39 comments)

    Like many Get Rich Slowly readers, I credit Your Money or Your Life with changing the way I approach my personal finances. This book transformed my relationship with money, and helped me to understand that by spending beyond my means, I was sacrificing a secure future for today’s passing pleasures. One of the book’s key insights is that time really is money. Or, approaching it from the other direction, money is time. The authors write:…

  • How Do You Turn Passion into a Career? (And Should You?) (31 comments)

    Ask Metafilter is one of my favorite sites on the internet; I’ve been an active member there for years. It’s a great place to get advice on many subjects, including money. And careers. Recently a user named Entropic asked a question about “finding your passion”, which received an awesome reply from my pal Grumblebee. Here, with permission (and a tiny bit of editing), is that Ask Metafilter exchange. Entropic How did you find your passion?…

  • You Make HOW Much? Getting Paid What You’re Worth (34 comments)

    A little blurb in the 22 September 2008 issue of Newsweek caught my eye. Linda Stern writes that younger workers are becoming more comfortable about sharing their salary information with friends and co-workers. She points out that it’s also possible to make more generalized salary comparisons using web tools like: Glassdoor.com, which allows employees to share salaries and review employers. (You must register to see details, though.) Salary.com, which offers a wide range of employment…

  • The Best Salesman in the World (39 comments)

    In yesterday’s links roundup, I shared the story of Joe Ades, the gentleman grafter. Ades sells vegetable peelers on the streets of New York City by day, but goes home at night to a three-bedroom Park Avenue apartment. According to a 2006 Vanity Fair profile: Then it’s out again for an early dinner in a style unheard of in London Labour. Six nights a week, accompanied by [his wife], he hits some of the biggest-name…

  • Every Job I’ve Ever Had (67 comments)

    It’s Labor Day in the United States, the holiday that traditionally marks the end of summer and the beginning of the new school year. Officially, it’s intended as “a day off for the working citizens”. Because it’s Labor Day, I’ve spent much of the morning recalling all of the jobs I’ve had in my life. When I was young, I wanted to be a business executive or an astronaut or a writer. I’ve actually managed…

  • Reader Success Story: How I Gave Myself a Raise (20 comments)

    Jon wrote yesterday to share a success story of personal finance principles in action. Here’s a slightly modified version of his e-mail. I’ve been a reading personal finance blogs for some time now, and one thing I’ve seen repeated over and over is: if you are looking for a raise, the easiest thing to do is to ask for one. I was skeptical of this advice until this last week when I made it work…

  • Enough is Enough: Wealth is What You Make It (44 comments)

    This is a guest post from Steve Ross, a pastor at a church in rural Oregon. I learned something about how wealthy I am recently. I am a pastor in a congregation that is in a financial crisis. We’re reaching new people, but as our older givers die the losses exceed the gains in terms of financial support. This year we have a $100,000 deficit in our budget. Yikes! As our Finance Committee worked on…

  • Network Your Way to Job Security (42 comments)

    This is a guest post from Brandt Smith, who writes for Wealth and Wisdom, a blog focused on helping you achieve wealth and life balance through entrepreneurship. I was stunned but not surprised when Don wouldn’t meet my eyes that morning. I had grown suspicious when he started passing me over earlier that week while handing out new projects. I was responsible for 40% of the workload in a three man group — why else…

  • Reader Comment: Further Thoughts on Careers and Jobs (38 comments)

    There have been a couple great discussions this week at Get Rich Slowly. The article on tips for first-time homebuyers yielded many anecdotes and suggestions. My piece on the difference between a career and a job also sparked conversation. In fact, I wanted to share a counterpoint from Funny about Money, who wrote the following. In a job where you’re not paid equitably, how much effort really should you put in? In a job where…

  • The Difference Between a Career and a Job (62 comments)

    What is the difference between a career and a job? Trent at The Simple Dollar recently suggested the following dichotomy: A job is something you do simply to earn money; a career is a series of connected employment opportunities. A job has minimal impact on your future work life, while a career provides experience and learning to fuel your future. A job offers few networking opportunities, but a career is loaded with them. When you…

  • Ask the Readers: Advice for Starting a New Business? (61 comments)

    I encourage GRS readers to pursue their dreams. I also extol the virtues of entrepreneurship. Mike believes he’s ready to take both pieces of advice to heart. He wants to leave his job, set out on his own, and start a new business. But he’s worried. He wonders if Get Rich Slowly readers can offer any advice. Here’s his story: I’ve been at the same job since I graduated from college nearly ten years ago….

  • The Informational Interview: A Job-Hunter’s Secret Weapon (16 comments)

    This article originally appeared at I Will Teach You to Be Rich in a slightly different format. Finding a job can be tough. Competition is fierce, and even if you’ve got the skills, it’s a challenge to make yourself known to the right people. According to Michael Hampton, Director of Career Development at Western Oregon University, informational interviews are a valuable networking technique that can give you an edge on your competition. The informational interview…

  • Reader Story: Beware of Scams and Pyramid Schemes (107 comments)

    In the past, I’ve shared the story of the worst job I ever had. In a lot of ways, it felt like I was part of a pyramid scheme or multi-level marketing operation. I’ve been approached to participate in similar operations since then: once by my veterinarian (?!?) and once by a stranger in a book store. Sometimes you cannot tell a scam is a scam until you see it up close, and then the…

  • Life After School: Advice for New Graduates (50 comments)

    On Tuesday evening I gave my first-ever presentation about personal finance. I spoke to a group of about 70 graduating seniors from Western Oregon University. My talk went okay. It wasn’t terrible, but it certainly wasn’t good. It’s a start. I learned a lot, and I’ll do better next time. I was the fourth and final speaker of the evening, though. Before I talked about personal finance, three WOU alums spoke about life after college….

  • I Quit My Job — What Should I Do With My 401k? (81 comments)

    This is a guest post from Todd at The Working Dollar. When you leave your job, you have several choices regarding your 401(k). These options are pretty much universal, meaning they apply to every 401(k) and to every job change situation. Your options are: Cash the 401(k) plan and receive a full pay-out I’ve listed this option first because it has the most serious ramifications. First, if you take a full payout, you will have…

  • Some Thoughts on Goals and Adult Education (44 comments)

    Last night, Kris and I had dinner with Craig and Lisa. Craig is an architect. Lisa is a technical writer who has spent the past few years as a stay-at-home mother. (Lisa contributed two GRS guest posts last year: How to find great deals on eBay and Career advice for the college graduate.) Now that their children are a little older, Lisa has the itch to return to the workplace, to find some non-motherly pursuit…

  • 6 Tips for Landing Your Dream Job (31 comments)

    This is a guest post from Alexandra Levit. Alexandra writes Water Cooler Wisdom, a career advice blog. Her new book, How’d You Score That Gig? A Guide to the Coolest Careers — and How To Get Them, has just been published. Do you have a job that’s just like everyone else’s? Are you looking for a nine-to-five…but wish you weren’t? Do you wish there was another option, one that would lead to an exciting, unique,…

  • What to Do If You’re Laid Off? (41 comments)

    About a month ago at AskMetafilter, a user wrote looking for advice on what do after losing his job: TERROR! After 25 years in the IT industry in Ireland I feel like the 21st century equivalent of an expendable 19th century coal miner. I’m about to be made redundant (again) this afternoon and am gripped by terror. I don’t even know now what I want. Any career counseling advice? The advice in the Ask Metafilter…

  • Uncommon Lifestyles and the Truth About the 4-Hour Workweek: An Interview with Tim Ferriss (41 comments)

    One of the fundamental premises of the Get Rich Slowly philosophy is that by making sacrifices and smart moves now, you can create a better life in the future. It’s a philosophy of deferred gratification. But what if you don’t want to wait to enjoy life’s rewards? What if you want to take advantage of opportunities while you’re still young? Is there a way to do this while still maintaining a smart approach to money?…

  • How to Quit Your Job Gracefully (54 comments)

    Deb Perelman at eWeek recently shared some advice on how to quit your job with your bridges intact. Too often smart employees let their guard down during their final days, and they do things that may actually damage their career. Perelman polled coaches, recruiters, and workplace experts to create a list of steps that can help you leave your job with class: Be sure you’re making the right choice. Sometimes that dream job isn’t. Do…

  • The Pros and Cons of Working at Home (31 comments)

    This is a guest post from Betsy Teutsch, who writes about socially responsible investing, savvy consuming, and sustainable living at Money Changes Things.                I sit down to work at my second floor drawing table in the morning and look out the window at traffic backed up on Wissahickon Avenue.  I marvel as I gaze at the cars through the blooming dogwood — how did I get so lucky?  I have worked at home for…

  • How to Earn More from Your Current Job (Without a Raise or Promotion) (27 comments)

    This is a guest post from Lily of The Honest Dollar, a great new personal finance blog. The most common ways to increase your salary are to get promoted or to negotiate a raise. But promotions don’t come along often, and negotiating a raise may or may not result in a salary increase. So what do you do when you want to make more, but you’re between promotions and raises? The good news is that…

  • Some Final Thoughts on Work, Education, and Fulfillment (10 comments)

    I’ve been pleased with our discussion here over the past couple days. Many of you have contributed valuable insights about education and careers. I always tell people that Get Rich Slowly has the best readers — your thoughtful comments continue to impress me. Thank you. Other people have made fine additions to the conversation at their own sites. At All Financial Matters, Meg argues that loving your job is overrated. I believe that she’s correct,…

  • Ask the Readers: How To Find Work That You Love? (93 comments)

    During yesterday’s discussion about the value of a college education, several people noted that it’s difficult to decide what to study when you don’t know what you want to do with your life. This reminded me of a recent question from the Get Rich Slowly discussion forums. Shaun wants to know: How do you find work that you love? It’s been said, “If you love your job, you’ll never work a day in your life.”…

  • The Value of a College Education (139 comments)

    I’ve been thinking lately about the value of a college education. I earned a B.A. in Psychology from Willamette University in 1991 (with a minor in English Lit, and almost another minor in Speech Com). What have I done with this degree? Almost nothing. Yet I do not regret the money and years I spent working to earn it. The financial value of a college degree Does earning a college degree make a difference to…

  • Parents.com Stay-at-Home Calculator (44 comments)

    When a new baby arrives, young couples face a decision. If both parents work, who should stay home with the child? The mother? The person with the smallest salary? Or should both parents continue to work? Often this decision is about more than money — personal values may determine the best course of action. But sometimes both parents continue to work because they believe they need the income. In her book Miserly Moms [my review],…

  • Ask the Readers: Is Education Always a Good Investment? (75 comments)

    Lisa is trying to decide what to do with her life. She’s in her mid-thirties, has two young children, and for the past few years has spent most of her time parenting. Now that the kids are older, she’d like to go back to school. But she’s worried it might not be a smart financial decision: Common wisdom says that education is always a good investment. Is that always true? If I already have a…

  • How to Earn Extra Income Through Private Tutoring (28 comments)

    This is a guest post from Jeff Sackmann, a GMAT tutor based in New York City. Jeff runs the blog GMAT Hacks.  He is the author of The GMAT Math Bible and several other GMAT-related resources. Are you looking for a way to earn some extra money?  Did you do well in school, or on standardized tests?  Offering tutoring services may be a good bet for you. I’ve been a private tutor for the better…

  • Quitting the Day Job: Finding the Guts to Pursue Your Dreams (223 comments)

    Something amazing has happened in the past eighteen months. While I’ve been learning about personal finance — and sharing my knowledge with you — Get Rich Slowly has grown from a small site with a couple hundred readers into a real-life business. GRS currently has 35,000 subscribers and generates $5,000 in monthly revenue. It also takes most of my time. This is a blessing and a curse. The Blessing As my income from this site…

  • Better Use of Leisure Time: Self-Improvement Tips from 1950 (18 comments)

    I’ve written before about how profitable it can be to use your free time to engage in money-making hobbies. But even if your hobbies don’t earn you money directly, you can still use them to develop useful skills, skills that may help you earn more down the road. From 1950, here’s a short film describing the advantages of making better use of leisure time: Time. Leisure time. Did you ever stop to think how much…

  • Money-Saving Ideas for Working Parents (18 comments)

    Over at The Dollar Stretcher, Pamela wrote looking for money-saving ideas that won’t burden an overfull schedule: I need some tips from women who work outside the home and drive to a workplace everyday then have to come home after a long work day and take care of house and family. I often can’t use tips from women who stay home because they require too much time. For instance, I don’t have time for gardening….

  • Breaking the Shackles: How to Escape from Minimum Wage (70 comments)

    Earlier today I provided a statistical snapshot of minimum wage earners. The numbers indicate that in the United States: Most minimum wage earners are young. Most minimum wage earners work in food service. Most minimum wage earners have never attended college. Statistics are one thing, but real-life is another. There are still millions of older college-educated Americans who earn minimum wage in jobs outside the food service industry. Many of these people want to escape…

  • Who Earns Minimum Wage? A Statistical Profile (52 comments)

    There’s been some discussion recently among moneybloggers about writing more for those who earn the minimum wage, and for those who face other financial difficulties. This is a good thing. But all this talk made me wonder: How prevalent is the minimum wage? Who works minimum wage jobs? I decided to do some research. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the median annual income of a U.S. worker is $32,140. Federal minimum wage is…

  • Drama in Real Life: “You’re Fired!” (75 comments)

    We just fired an employee. Letting a person go is never an easy thing, especially at a small family business like ours. We treat our employees well, and relate to them as real men and women instead of cogs in a machine. But there are times when an employee just isn’t working out, and we’ve got to let him go. The fellow we just fired was our 21-year-old truck driver. He’s been a little shaky…

  • Traveling to Save: How to Get Paid to Live Overseas (28 comments)

    This is a guest post from Cassie Browne. Cassie writes about discovering food in Japan at Eaten in Translation. J.D. has written about how to save for an overseas trip and how to have a vacation on a budget, but if you have time on your hands and like the idea of living in another culture, traveling overseas can be a financial opportunity, rather than a liability. I’ve spent the last two years working in…

  • Requesting (and Receiving) the Raise You Deserve (10 comments)

    This is a guest post from Alexandra Levit. Alexandra writes Water Cooler Wisdom, a career advice blog. First things first — when is a good time to ask for a raise?  Coming off a strong performance review in which your boss acknowledged your accomplishments is a good bet, because he will probably be expecting you to broach the subject of money.  If you’ve just taken on a new role, or your management has raised the…

  • Book Review: The 4-Hour Workweek (59 comments)

    When I picked up The 4-Hour Workweek, I was worried it was some sort of “get rich quick” book. The first few pages didn’t do much to change my mind. The author, Timothy Ferriss, makes a lot of bold claims, such as: “How do you create a hands-off business that generates $80,000 per month with no management? It’s all here.” But something happened during the first few chapters. When I read a book, I use…

  • Getting the Guts to Relocate to a Cheaper City (65 comments)

    This guest post is from Penelope Trunk, author of Brazen Careerist: The New Rules for Success. Trunk is a career columnist for the Boston Globe and Yahoo! Finance, and also dispenses wisdom on her blog. I recently relocated from New York City to Madison, Wisconsin. I made the move in order to have a lower cost of living, and to give me more flexibility to focus on things that will really make me and my…

  • Three Ways to Be Sure You’re Paid What You’re Worth (32 comments)

    A reader contacted me via IM this week to ask for help with his job search. GRS reader: hey JD J.D.: Hey, David. GRS reader: i am in talks with a company to go work in the us, arizona to be precise, and they asked what are my salary expectations GRS reader: i have no clue what they are… I am 23 years old, and I just want to live confortably for the period I…

  • Career Advice for the College Graduate (28 comments)

    This is a guest post from Lisa Lessley Briscoe. My friend (and fellow Bearcat) Lisa writes: “I was just poking around on GRS (I don’t usually read) and noticed that you’d posted an entry for college graduates recently. Funny how summer rolls around and you start thinking about stuff.” She’s passed along some additional advice for those just entering the workplace. Congratulations, you just graduated from an excellent liberal arts college! You worked incredibly hard…

  • Ask the Readers: How Do You Find a Job? (46 comments)

    Mandy from Personal Finance 101 needs advice on job-hunting. She recently moved across the country, and now finds herself looking for work. She could use some tips. I’ve decided to break down and get a “real job” (my mom’s words) while I’m growing my business out here in Portland and I’m finding the job hunt to be less than thrilling. I’ve never had to really look for a job before, so I think I have…

  • Ask the Readers: How Do You Get a Job When Nobody Will Give You a Chance? (38 comments)

    Last fall I wrote an entry entitled “What Do You Want to Be When You Grow Up?” I described how it’s difficult to know what you want to do when you’re 21. (And how sometimes it’s difficult to know what you want to do when you’re 41!) Tonya discovered that discussion last week, and it prompted to share some of her frustrations. She’s stuck in a job she hates, and she can’t see a way…

  • Finding Your Life Work: Vocational Lessons from 1940 (7 comments)

    You folks seemed to enjoy “Your Thrift Habits”, the educational film I posted last week. I liked it too. I’ve found a few more of these to share, and will post them on Saturday mornings. Today’s film is “Finding Your Life Work”, which was produced in 1940 by Vocational Guidance Films, Inc. This movie is twenty minutes long. “Did you ever go fishing without any bait?” asks the narrator. “Of course you didn’t!” You couldn’t…

  • More Money: 5 Ways to Earn Extra Cash in Your Spare Time (67 comments)

    The discussion yesterday about how to earn money when you’ve lost your job got me thinking about ways to earn extra income outside regular employment. None of these are quick fixes, but they’re ways to generate cash in your spare time. Get a second job vslide_var1 = ‘vslide-extracash’; A second job can be an excellent way to earn extra money if you have the time and energy. Why have a second job? To pay off…

  • Coping with Unemployment: Blogging is NOT the Answer (41 comments)

    Lazy Man wrote to me yesterday with a crisis from one of his readers. I received this very distressing letter today: “Hi Lazy man, tell me how do you create a blog to get help to pay my bills. I was recently layed off work because of budget cuts with a non profit organizations that I was working for and I just purchased a home, and would like to keep it.  I have been applying…

  • Finding a Mentor: It Never Hurts to Ask (14 comments)

    Your career is one of your most important assets. After your health, it plays the largest role in determining your ability to acquire wealth. Penelope Trunk’s Brazen Careerist is a weblog filled with practical workplace advice that that can help separate you from your peers. Some of her past articles include: How much money do you need to be happy? (Hint: your sex life matters more.) What to do in college to be successful in…

  • Anatomy of an Overnight Success (11 comments)

    You’re not going to get rich quickly from your hobby. While it’s possible to earn a little income from a hobby or a side-business in a short time, to truly make it profitable takes hard work over the course of many months, if not years. I’ve been blogging for six years, but it’s only just recently that I’ve begun to make money at it. The same is true for many people who earn side-income from…

  • Become a Consultant to Defeat Debt Quickly (13 comments)

    The recent discussion about job-loss included a debate on the merits of becoming a consultant. Regular reader Andréa Coutu is a consultant. She wrote this guest article on how to become a consultant in order to explain the concept to Get Rich Slowly readers. Getting rid of household debt is one of the best ways to put your financial house in order. But sometimes debt can seem insurmountable. The percentage of disposable income used to…

  • Ask the Readers: How to Get Started in Life? (18 comments)

    Over the past week, I’ve received a barrage of messages from people seeking specific personal finance advice. While I’m willing to offer help where I can, many times the questions lay outside my area of expertise. I’m just a regular guy who is learning about personal finance and sharing the information with the world. I’m not a trained financial advisor. I can offer generalities, but the specifics are sometimes beyond me. Lifehacker has a feature…

  • What Do You Want to Be When You Grow Up? (47 comments)

    How can you know what you want Till you get what you want And you see if you like it? — Steven Sondheim, Into the Woods We had some good friends over for dinner the other night. While we waited for the roast to finish, Wayne and I took the air on the back porch. We talked about work. I told him that this is a slow time of year at the box factory. “Yeah,”…

  • Salary Secrets and Myths (3 comments)

    Jeanne Sahadi at CNNMoney has written a guide to salary secrets and myths. “Employers seem to have the better hand in pay negotiations,” she writes. “But here are six ways to better read the cards they hold.” As a small business owner myself, I think Sahadi’s points are, well, on the money. Secret: Your pay doesn’t necessarily reflect performance and seniority. Stay tuned to market conditions. If you notice that your pay is flagging, especially…

  • A Beginner’s Guide to Freelancing (6 comments)

    Somewhere between workaday jobs and entrepreneurship lies the murky world of freelancing. The idea of striking out alone appeals to many people. But where does one start? Phil Gyford has created a beginner’s guide to freelancing. It’s been over a year since I first thought of writing down everything I’ve learned about freelancing. I’ve now been freelance for more than three years but the title still has a double meaning — this is both for…

  • How to Get the Most Out of a College Job (11 comments)

    A college job can be a chore. Or it can be the doorway to future success. The choice is yours. I asked Michael Hampton, director of career development for Western Oregon University, for advice on how college students should approach work. What should they look for in a job? What should they try to get out of it? Are college jobs really that important? We drafted the following seven tips, which we believe can help…

  • The Worst Job I Ever Had (83 comments)

    Your job is one of your most important assets. It gives you earning power. It can bring you personal fulfillment. But what happens when you’re stuck in a job you hate? Here’s the true story of the worst job I ever had. I made some poor choices at the end of my college career; as a result, I graduated without a prospect for work. No matter — I lived off my credit cards for a…

  • Nine Tips For Young People Starting Careers (13 comments)

    Jeanne Sahadi at CNN Money has posted the get-started guide to making it, a set of tips for young people starting their careers. I asked five managers I’ve known over the years and my favorite workplace expert what behaviors and attitudes in their eyes mark a new recruit as promising and promotion-worthy. The following attributes will help you succeed: Be willing to ask for help, but be able to take charge. Employers like for employees…

  • How to Give Yourself a Raise (7 comments)

    This is a guest post from Stephen A. Smith. My fiancée, Kerrie, has a good job. She works for Hachette Book Group (formerly Time Warner Book Group), where she gets three weeks of paid vacation every year and pays only 1% of her salary toward health insurance. But her primary preoccupation is with raising her net salary, and she found some additional benefits that helped her do just that. Like most companies, Hachette offers a…

  • The Most Lucrative College Degrees (6 comments)

    Are you still in school? Are you looking for a job that pays big bucks? CNN Money has a list of the most lucrative college degrees. Majors that have seen some of the biggest increases in average starting salaries are: Hospitality services management Business administration Accounting Economics Information sciences Civil engineering Chemical engineering Check out the entire list. With a little planning, you can earn a degree that will help you find a job that…

  • What Makes a Resumé Scream “Don’t Hire Me!” (10 comments)

    A column over at CNNMoney has some good advice on what to leave out of your resumé. Don’t include your hobbies. Don’t include your marital status. Don’t include information about your children. Don’t explain why you’re moving to a new town. Don’t detail the reasons you left your previous jobs. Don’t send your resumé as an attachment with a questionable name. The article cites one person who sent a resumé saved as ‘ssseexxxyyy_2006′. Don’t offer…

  • How To Acquire a Good Entry-Level Job (3 comments)

    Not everyone is ready to aim for a $100,000 job. On AskMetafilter, a user writes: I need to find some sort of long-term employment that will put me on my way to establishing financial independence from my family and also provide me with meaningful work experience. This is made difficult as I am eighteen, I only have a GED, and my resume leaves much to be desired. I do not have any prior work or…

  • How to Get a Job Paying More Than $100,000 (5 comments)

    I’ve written a lot about how you can save money, about how frugality and thrift can help you to get rich slowly. But another way to save more than you earn is to increase your income. Paul’s Tips offers a guide to getting a job that pays more than $100,000 a year. How do people get themselves into a position of earning good incomes at young ages? Why do some people work hard for minimum…

  • The Secret of My Success (5 comments)

    I found a piece last week that addresses an important facet of personal relationships. Michael Hyatt is often asked, “What’s the secret of your success?” His answer: “Responsiveness.” So many people I meet are unresponsive. They don’t return their phone calls promptly. They don’t answer their emails quickly. They don’t complete their assignments on time. They promise to do something and never follow through. They have to be reminded, prodded, and nagged. This behavior creates…

  • Best Jobs in America (1 comment)

    MONEY Magazine has posted its picks for the top fifty jobs in America. Heading the list are software engineer, college professor, and financial advisor. To find the best jobs in America, MONEY Magazine and Salary.com, a leading provider of employee compensation data and software, began by assembling a list of positions that the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects will grow at an above-average rate over ten years and that require at least a bachelor’s degree….