Affirm your way to wealth

This morning, I did something unusual. After I brushed my teeth, I looked in the mirror and recited:

  • “People love to give me money!”
  • “I am rich and wonderful.”
  • “I am now earning a great big income doing what satisfies me.”

I admit, I felt silly. I love a lot of New Age spiritual practices. (I've written before about using a money spell.) But talking to myself in the mirror was a little weird — even to me — never mind how silly I felt repeating these affirmations about my finances.

But can doing something as simple (and silly) as repeating daily affirmations make you richer? Chellie Campbell thinks so. Campbell is the author of The Wealthy Spirit, a book of daily affirmations on money. I spoke with her this week about the link between money and spirituality.

The Emperor's New Clothes?

Campbell recommends doing these affirmations every day. In fact, she has a list of 50 that she uses daily herself. She told me a story of how her publisher initially wanted to strike them from the book, and Campbell dared her to try them out. A month later, the publisher was an affirmation convert and the book stayed as it was. Campbell believes that affirmations not only make you feel better about yourself, but also will make you richer.

“The positive affirmations really help you. They juice up your energy,” Campbell says.

How is that supposed to work, exactly? Well, for starters, we all want to be around people who feel good about themselves. Our managers, clients and friends all feel the same way. So when opportunities arise, they tend to go to those with sunnier dispositions. This is why happier people make more money and have more successful careers, according to Gretchen Rubin in The Happiness Project [J.D.'s review]. If doing a morning affirmation reminds you to let a little more sunshine into your smile, it really might help you roll in more dough.

Campbell also sees daily affirmations as a way to set intentions for your day. To her, the affirmations are a part of getting dressed and ready to face the world. “You're dressing your energy,” she says. “After the outer is dressed, I want to dress the inner.”

You can't stop at affirmations, though. Campbell stresses that an affirmation is only the first step; it has to be followed up with actions. If you want good luck to befall you, you need to put yourself in the way of opportunities. That means networking, working hard at your job, and maintaining professional relationships. You also need to be willing to let some failures come and go, and not get bogged down thinking less of yourself because of them.

Continuing with her clothing metaphor, Campbell says, “Doing the affirmations is just like getting dressed for work. Then you have to go to work and do something to earn your paycheck.”

She says the changes should be apparent immediately, and describes the effect as “a little magical”. She shared stories of old debts being paid and money coming in from unexpected quarters. Whether you believe there's a link between the money affirmations and good financial luck or not, you can rely on the reality of a positive attitude to bring you improved “luck” in the form of more energy for your work and better networking opportunities.

Note: For more on luck, read these past GRS articles: Luck is No Accident and How to Make Your Own Luck.

Getting Started with Affirmations

Want to try some affirmations of your own? Here are half a dozen from Campbell's personal list that might be particularly well-suited to those of us aiming to “get rich slowly”:

  • “People love to give me money!”
  • “I am now earning a great big income doing what satisfies me.”
  • “All my bills are paid up in full and I still have all this money.”
  • “My affirmations work for me, whether I believe they will or not.”
  • “A lot more money is coming into my life. I deserve it and will use it for my good and others.”
  • “I am a money magnet!”

If you want to try this, but prefer to write your own affirmations, Campbell says there are a two important rules to follow.

  1. For starters, you want to phrase affirmations in the present tense. Not, “I will pay all my bills” but “All my bills are paid” or “I pay all my bills”. It's important to tell yourself you do these things now, not in some imagined and possibly distant future.
  2. You also want to be sure to put all your affirmations in positive language. Your mind can't think about a “not something”. Negatives disappear when talking to our inner selves (or our children). My husband and I observe this in parenting all the time. We call it the “ruckus problem”. One day we were in a cafe watching a young mom with her son. The boy was playing quietly by himself until the mom said, “Remember what I told you: NO RUCKUS!” Hearing the word “ruckus”, the kid immediately began creating one. Now, when we need to be reminded to put things in a positive framework, we just look at each other and say, “ruckus!” Similarly, you may want to say, “All my bills are paid” as an affirmation, not “I am not in debt”.

Following those rules, I've made up a few affirmations I plan to use this month, including:

  • “I am skilled and successful at my work.”
  • “I spend within my means.”
  • “I feel relaxed about my finances.”

Campbell more or less dared me to try a month of affirmations. It's impossible to talk to her and not feel some of her enthusiasm for the practice catch on. So I plan to give it a shot and see how it goes.

Building a Habit

The trickiest part will be making the affirmations a habit. Anyone who's ever tried to adopt a new habit or mindfulness practice knows how hard it can be. For me, the best way to add a practice or activity to my life is to use a “hook” from my existing routine. For example, I meditate mid-morning when my computer reminds me it's time to take a typing break. Before I used the wrist break software, I found it hard to make time for meditation. Now, that time is built in to my day. For the affirmations, I'm using toothbrushing, and saying them in the mirror after I've brushed my teeth.

Campbell recommends printing your affirmations and attaching them to the wall near your computer, or putting a copy on the dashboard in your car. I can speak to the power of having written reminders of your intention. I tend to surround myself with inspirational quotes and verses from my favorite poems. Mine all focus on love, not money, but they're powerful reminders to be more present and loving in my daily life. I may spend some time this month seeking out quotes on abundance as well.

If you're interested in reading more of Campbell's affirmations, she's blogging a page a day from The Wealthy Spirit at her website. You can also learn more about her workshops and other books there.

More Than Words

I don't believe for a moment that affirmations alone will make you wealthier. In fact, if all you do is affirm your good intentions, you're doing yourself a dangerous disservice. The key is to couple an affirmation or intention with action. Without action, an affirmation is no more effective than a drunken New Year's Resolution. Empty words won't help you pay your bills.

Often, having some kind of ritual or affirmation to link your intention to strengthens your commitment to doing it. That's where the magic happens. It doesn't come from the words you say. It comes from what you do after you've said them. You can use affirmations like these, or any other mindful personal ritual, simply to charge up your intentions. Whether you're looking for a job or struggling to live within your means, you need to constantly support yourself in the hard work of walking your talk. Ritualizing that support with a daily pep talk or inspirational practice can be a powerful tool for staying committed to your goals.

Note: I know many of you are skeptics. In fact, J.D. may be the biggest skeptic of them all. He didn't want to publish this post (and has in the past ripped similar ideas to shreds). He's all about action. I get that. But affirmations really are useful for some people. And after all, what does it hurt to try them?
More about...Psychology

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Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago
Shalom
Shalom
9 years ago

I agree wholly that actions are the critical part. There’s an interesting line of research that says that stating intentions can actually make you less likely to take the intended actions. Apparently when you talk about your goals and plans, you get a sense of accomplishment just from all the talking, and you may never follow through with action: http://www.psych.nyu.edu/gollwitzer/09_Gollwitzer_Sheeran_Seifert_Michalski_When_Intentions_.pdf Affirmations may be fine, but they need to be the little something extra and not the main event. Telling yourself that you attract wealth won’t do any good, and may actually cause harm, unless you’re out there working, saving and… Read more »

Panda
Panda
9 years ago

I’m not sure I totally believe in affirmations, but I’ve managed to incorporate them into my life in way that doesn’t make me feel silly and at least makes me breathe and smile periodically. My passwords at work are affirmations – using the first letter of each word in a sentence method. So every day when I log on I get to remind myself that “I Am A Strong Capable Individual!” (iaasci!) or “I Will Perserver And Push Through Completion!” (iwpaptc!), etc. It’s cheesy and hokey, but it doesn’t do any harm and at least reminds me to counter the… Read more »

vern
vern
9 years ago

Sounds a lot like Stuart Smalley:
I’m Good Enough, I’m Smart Enough, and Doggone It, People Like Me!

“Note: I know many of you are skeptics. In fact, J.D. may be the biggest skeptic of them all. He didn’t want to publish this post”

That would have been a good idea as the post was a waste of my time.

In the author talks about “empty words” yet the entire post is a bunch of B.S.

Get real.

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

Also agree with Shalom #2. Yes, there can be harm in trying. There’s a place for (and science of) cognitive restructuring, but cognitive restructuring would NOT say to say, “All my bills are paid” when that is not true. It would say something like, “I can pay my bills, I will pay my bills, (and this is how I am going to pay my bills).” It is important that the negative thinking be replaced with *realistic* thinking, not just generic positive thinking that has no basis in reality. There’s plenty of research on this topic. Textbooks even. Since this is… Read more »

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
9 years ago
Blarg! I was going to have a comment typed and ready to go, but I’ve been so swamped that I forgot to do so. I have to finish writing a short essay for another venue, but then I’ll come back and explain why I don’t buy into this affirmation crap stuff.
ellie
ellie
9 years ago

I worked in an elementary school. For an entire year I had lunchroom duty every single day. Have you ever spent even a single hour in a school lunchroom?

Three cheers for affirmations !!! Thanks to my daily recitation “I enjoy lunchroom duty. I have a really good time,” I DID enjoy the duty, I DID have a really good time – and so did the kids. Affirmations are great!!!

Lisa
Lisa
9 years ago

Ever since I had an acquaintance who repeatedly said, “I have 2 million in the bank” (she didn’t), I have been an “affirmation skeptic.” She even packed up her house in anticipation of moving to a huge McMansion. I don’t know how long she walked around boxes until reality sank in.

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
9 years ago

Thanks, my energy really could use some juicing up.

Jerry
Jerry
9 years ago

I am enjoying the meta-tude of “My affirmations work for me, whether I believe they will or not.”

actual psychology
actual psychology
9 years ago
i’m a research psychologist who studies self-affirmations. and they only actually are useful in changing intentions or future behavior when individuals are unaware that they are self-affirming. so those explicit self-affirmations do not work at all, and as the posts above suggest may actually have the opposite effect.

unfortunately, there are many non-researchers/non-scientists on the Internet that continue to perpetuate this myth.

a quick google scholar of “self affirmations aware” will lead you to the relevant research articles.

Leo Foster
Leo Foster
4 years ago

well…… You posted actual psychology says: 16 March 2011 at 3:32 pm i’m a research psychologist who studies self-affirmations. and they only actually are useful in changing intentions or future behavior when individuals are unaware that they are self-affirming. so those explicit self-affirmations do not work at all, and as the posts above suggest may actually have the opposite effect. Since you are such an expert in psychology, I challenge you to repeat over and over all through the day and especially when going to sleep at night… ”I AM GETTING SICKER EVERY DAY. I HAVE TERMINAL CANCER. I AM… Read more »

retirebyforty
retirebyforty
9 years ago

and doggone it, People Like Me!

Marsha
Marsha
9 years ago

ellie #7–

I think having a good attitude, like you did about your lunchroom duty, is great. But I think these silly affirmations are something entirely different.

My sons thought I loved doing laundry because I always sang while doing it. It was really my most hated chore, but I sang songs to keep myself going.

Amanda
Amanda
9 years ago

I agree w those that say this article is useless to me. (as most of sierra’s?)

mike crosby
mike crosby
9 years ago

Great idea. I think I’ll quit my job so I can use affirmations to convince myself how rich I am.

Aspiring Millionaire
Aspiring Millionaire
9 years ago

I am a big believer in affirmations and the law of attraction.

I have seen it work in every aspect of my life and my life has big changes happening now which will enable me to fulfill my goals.

I decided a little while ago to be a millionaire and focusing on that goal and doing what I can when I can has meant I will be able to achieve my goal.

If you think you can’t do something, you’ve already lost.

Mike Holman
Mike Holman
9 years ago

I liked the article.

I think “affirmations” are silly, but it’s interesting to see how other people think. Especially when they are very different than myself.

BTW Nicole – you should really put some text when posting a link. For all I know that link could lead to a pic of Tyler in his CKs. 😉

Rosa Rugosa
Rosa Rugosa
9 years ago

This reminds me of The Secret, and I think it is a crock!

csdx
csdx
9 years ago

Heh, this reminds me of the junk mail I just got yesterday. It was a letter with a ‘prayer mat’ (read: sheet of folded paper), telling me that I should pray to God for stuff like more money, or a new car (oh and send the church organization a donation, natch).

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
9 years ago

There are linguists who refute the common notion that language evolved out of the need to communicate, since something like 99% of language activity in the brain is self-talk. According to them, language preceded speech. [Sorry I can’t provide a reference, this I learned in conversation with a linguist] With that in mind, and considering how we talk inside our heads all day, I think it’s perfectly fine to monitor your internal talk, pump yourself up, and encourage yourself to accomplish greater things even though they may seem difficult or impossible. Sometimes we internalize self-defeating patterns and negative messages that… Read more »

jim
jim
9 years ago

I’m willing to believe that affirmations can help some people if it helps improve their mental outlook or improve their self esteem etc. If you are the type of person who feels that you are a failure then continuing to consider yourself a failure will not lead to success. In that situation an affirmation that reinforces positive attitude might be useful. Instead of constantly telling yourself in your head that you’re a loser, start telling yourself in the mirror that you’re a capable person who’s able to achieve success. Its about attitude. Of course on the other hand people can… Read more »

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
9 years ago

Okay. I’ve finally put out most of the fires that were blazing around me, and I can turn my attention to this post. As Sierra mentioned, I’m not a fan. I know there are some GRS readers who do like affirmations, and I’m not opposed to letting other people read this post and make up their own minds, but I, for one, think affirmations are a waste of time. And, in fact, I agree that they can be dangerous. Now, I’ll be the first in line to sing the praises of positive thinking. Absolutely! I think the power of positive… Read more »

Tage
Tage
9 years ago

Meh, I read this site all the time and I find this to be the least helpful article to date. I do believe in being positive and confident enough (if I have done research) in my own skills to execute investment strategies. I don’t believe that “affirmations” is the thing that would push me over the edge, it’s simply trusting in my skills and not being too afraid of what might happen. If I do nothing, NOTHING will happen, so risks must be taken.

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

@17 It’s just an SNL clip. @JD… Sure, but this isn’t something that people can argue as if it’s a point of opinion. It’s an empirical question: Do affirmations work, and if so, when and how? People can go back and forth talking about what they believe about whether or not it works, but it’s something that scientists have actually tested in randomized controlled experiments. There’s a HUGE literature to draw on. Just writing opinions on something like this in either direction … well, it could be done a lot better. I’m not a psychologist, but it would make a… Read more »

sarah
sarah
9 years ago

I don’t understand this. An affirmation is saying something positive and true about yourself like “I work hard” or “I have a good sense of humor” to help yourself be more positive. Saying something completely false that you WISH was true is not an affirmation.

I’m guessing people would have the same effect by stating goals out loud and positive steps being taken to achieve them (actually I’d expect better results from this since most people probably feel too silly to do it the other way).

Diane
Diane
9 years ago

Let us know how that works out.

Catherine
Catherine
9 years ago

Some people like chocolate ice cream, some people like vanilla. If affirmations work for you, great. If they don’t, or you chose not to find out, great, too. Enough with the sanctimony, snark and judgment. There are plenty of ways to get rich slowly without slamming other people.

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
9 years ago

Deaf or mute people are missing out on this one, too. How will they ever get rich without being able to tell themselves that they are?

Annemarie
Annemarie
9 years ago

I hope Campbell doesn’t just tell her readers to go forth and do useful career and self-promoting stuff.

Without providing a little more information or instruction, that’s useless. With it, it’s just any other self-improvement manual.

Affirmations are like reading instructions for a diet and expecting to get thin. It’s all about the fantasy.

D R @ Motivating Minutes
D R @ Motivating Minutes
9 years ago

I’m becoming a big believer in action. If I find time to do the affirmations too I’ll test it out and see.

I think belief has a big impact as well.

If you believe in what you’re selling or doing – chances are you’ll follow through.

If you don’t believe in what you’re selling or doing – phrases you repeat back to yourself …even to the contrary – may seem hokey & mpty.

Karen in MN
Karen in MN
9 years ago

Attraction thinking is bunk, but changing the way you think about yourself will really make a big difference in your life. If you believe that you are a screw up who will never stay on your budget, you will fulfill that. Therefore I think it is useful to repeat to yourself every day, “I am a responsible person and I have my financial life under control and I am taking the steps to get (whatever your goal is–a car, out of debt, an emergency fund).” It’s a great way to stop the “why bother? I’ll always be broke!” negative thinking… Read more »

Jaime
Jaime
9 years ago

This speaker in this TED video says you should keep goals to yourself. http://blog.ted.com/2010/09/02/keep-your-goals-to-yourself-derek-sivers-on-ted-com/ I have to agree with J.D. I believe in being positive, in setting goals and following them up with actions. But I don’t like affirmations like “people love giving me money” – in fact I refuse to say them. People don’t like giving you money but people are willing to give you money only if you make it their while such as through selling them a good or a service. The reality is people hold on tight to their money. People don’t love giving money. What… Read more »

Pat S.
Pat S.
9 years ago

I fail to see the use in empty affirmations and hollow words. Hard work will get you much farther in this life than wishes and dreams. How does the expression go… %*[email protected] in one hand, wish in the other… see which one fills up first.

Chris
Chris
9 years ago

I liked this article.
Affirmations and positive thinking have worked really well for me (and my finances) over the years.
If you want to give affirmations a try, check out the “Har-money” cards. Not sure who publishes them, but they’re available online.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
9 years ago

@32 Jaime– that’s a brilliant short talk, thanks for posting it.

In my family we have a custom that when we *really* want something to happen we don’t tell other people. My parents arrived at this from empirical observation, and lacking a rational explanation attributed it to a “jinx” (even though they aren’t really superstitious, don’t believe in luck or play games of chance, etc. ). Now thanks to science the mystery of the blabbermouth jinx is finally solved!

Jaime
Jaime
9 years ago

El Nerdo-Glad you liked it 😀

Matt
Matt
9 years ago

Let me start by saying I have a very low tolerance for spiritual BS. If it sounds hokey, it probably is hokey. Friends of mine who are religious have to have pretty intellectual relationships with their religion otherwise they get on my nerves. I’m the person that created a competing environmental club at university during my freshmen year because “those dirty @#&$ing hippies aren’t accomplishing anything with their stupid drum circles.” I don’t want to stand around making noise at the expense of getting things done. But this post did say that. Affirming isn’t enough. And lying to ourselves can… Read more »

Bogey@BackNineFinance
9 years ago

1. I am the best looking man on the planet.
2. I am the richest man on the planet.
3. I am the best blogger on the planet.

(I live on a planet all by myself)

I agree with several other commenters, this article is pretty silly. Talk to the mirror all you want, I’ll be out trying to make something happen.

Leo Foster
Leo Foster
4 years ago

Hi, Bogey…. Well, it has quite been some time since your “”intelligent”” post denigrating SIERRA’s work. Shall we check on your progress? [email protected] says: 16 March 2011 at 8:12 pm 1. I am the best looking man on the planet. 2. I am the richest man on the planet. 3. I am the best blogger on the planet. I CAN BET THAT… 1.YOU ARE NOT the best looking man on the planet. 2.YOU ARE NOT the richest man on the planet. 3.YOU ARE NOT the best blogger on the planet. 4. YOU HAVEN’T ACCOMPLISHED A DAMN THING!!!! SIERRA did a… Read more »

Jill
Jill
9 years ago

I watch this youtube video whenever I need a pick me up, and get my thinking back on track.

Pure positive energy, regardless of who’s saying it or who’s receiving it can’t be beat:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qR3rK0kZFkg

Shareeke Edmead-Nesi
Shareeke Edmead-Nesi
9 years ago

Everything starts in the mind. Creating a conscious mind will help you to achieve financial success. Affirmation can help you train your mind that money is kind to you and you will be kind or in control of it. The affirmations also create a conscious awareness of what you say and desire your finances to be. Now believe in your affirmations and become a conscious creator of your financial life.

Chellie Campbell
Chellie Campbell
9 years ago

I received a google alert that Sierra’s article about my book had been published, so came over here to read it and review the comments. Quite a rollicking discussion! I’d like to add a few points and clarify what I think affirmations actually do. Let me start by saying that my experience in financial matters before writing this book and creating my Financial Stress Reduction Workshops twenty years ago was owning a bookkeeping service with 13 employees, many clients, and nearly half a million per year in sales. I’m a very practical person, and things had better work before I’m… Read more »

Kathy Z
Kathy Z
9 years ago

I think critics are oversimplifying and missing nuances about the concept of affirmations. Saying an affirmation like, “I have plenty of money to pay my bills” doesn’t have to mean that you’re tricking yourself into believing it if it’s not true. You can still be well aware of your current situation. And just because some people do destructively delude themselves, doesn’t mean there’s no value when used properly. (Just like cars are a valuable tool for people, even though some people are horrible drivers and cause fatal accidents.) So what’s the point? To make pretend. To conjure up the “feeling”… Read more »

sfkiddo
sfkiddo
9 years ago

JD, I’ve been reading this blog since you began it and have always appreciated the commonsense theme in the title: Get Rich Slowly. There are no quick fixes; I cannot simply “affirm” that I have enough for retirement, spend within my means, and am organized. In fact, your blog emphasizes that, if you want to change your financial situation, you must take responsibility and DO realistic actions. While I do feel that the guest blogger, Sierra, actually believes what she is saying, it doesn’t mean that what she says is correct. One, she doesn’t understand the definition of the word… Read more »

sfkiddo
sfkiddo
9 years ago

@37 Matt: Yes, you were thinking of Pascal, but not “fake it to you make it.” “Pascal’s Wager” was a way of hedging your spiritual bet: if you believe in God and he doesn’t exist, you wasted some time worshiping something you don’t believe in, no big deal. If you don’t believe in God, and He DOES exist, bummer, hell for you! So you may as well believe in God.

Kathy Ozzard Chism
Kathy Ozzard Chism
9 years ago

Chellie Campbell and her books are delightful, and anyone who takes the time to read them and use her wisdom benefits greatly.

Even my skeptical “Mr. Science” husband started doing Chellie’s “Wealthy Spirit” daily affirmations after he saw how energized, calm, proactive, and successful I was becoming using them.

He now loves them, too, and is watching his sales increase with a smile.

Neither of us go a day now without using the affirmations, both Chellie’s and our own.

Don’t knock it until you’ve tried it. 🙂

Simon
Simon
9 years ago

I want to throw in here the faith-perspective on prayer. I do think there’s something weird about saying, “I am a money magnet!” in the mirror, especially if you’re, ahem, not a money magnet at all. But, that said, I am a deep believer in God, in a God who cares about our realities, and this includes money-struggles. I do believe that, when we are honest with God about our faults and we ask God for help, God will help us out. I’m not saying we’ll get a million dollars (actually I think God is against wealth more often than… Read more »

Mia
Mia
9 years ago

I have great experiences using affirmations. But I agree that they have to be combined with action, otherwise they will get you nowhere. I like what Chellie Campbell says about the fact that you affirm things that aren’t true yet: ‘telling the truth in advance’. If you consistently use affirmations (I do them first thing in the morning after waking up and last thing in the evening before switching off the light in bed), you will see things happening in your life. Some changes happen fast, some take a longer time, but I’ve often been surprised to see that I… Read more »

Luke
Luke
9 years ago

Drivel.

Dan Blakely
Dan Blakely
9 years ago

Some of these affirmation types ideas with wealth seem to have their roots in “Think and Grow Rich” from Napoleon Hill. Mostly tied around self-doubt and self-esteem. Not sure if I really buy into the idea of daily affirmations but I do believe that approaching life with a general fun loving and positive attitudes can pay big dividends… but I don’t see myself doing affirmations in the mirror.

Pamela
Pamela
9 years ago

My problem with Sierra’s affirmations is not whether they work or not. I’ll leave that to the behavioral scientists. I felt really uncomfortable with what she decided to affirm. I know this won’t be popular with lots of folks here but if I I’m going to put my attention toward achieving something meaningful in my life, it won’t be being “rich and wonderful” or people giving me money. How about affirming that I live in a community of people and that I need to be generous with others? How about that I will remember that I’m not the center of… Read more »

Leo Foster
Leo Foster
4 years ago
Reply to  Pamela

GREAT POST, SIERRA! Poor Pamela. You are the center of your universe and you are creating everything that exists around YOU — whether you like it or not, whether you believe it or not. And you are foolishly denying that and short-circuiting your own POWER to attract more wealth and be of greater service to humanity. Poor people, people with scarcity//poverty mentality cannot help anybody. They cannot even help themselves! Money RUNS this physical universe/reality — NOT the limited, poverty thoughts that you have. Imagine all the good that you could do to all the people on this earth if… Read more »

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