Getting started – Review of the Mint.com signup process

On Tuesday, I wrote that I've decided to track my finances again. I'm doing fine financially, but after a few months of not watching my income and expenses closely, I feel a little lost. I miss the ability to know exactly where my money's going.

I had intended to install the new desktop version of Quicken, which is what I've been using for years. (Before that, I used Andrew Tobias's Managing Your Money, but that hasn't been updated since 1995!) In the comments to Tuesday's post, several readers asked why I don't just use Mint. Good question. I don't really have a good answer.

What is Mint?

Mint is a free web-based personal-finance program. Mint automagically connects with your bank accounts, your credit card accounts, and — in theory, at least — your investment accounts. Because Mint fetches data for you, there's no tedious data entry. Mint has been around for a couple of years, but I've been reluctant to try it.

I haven't tried Mint for several reasons:

  • It didn't offer all the features I wanted, particularly the ability to track investment accounts.
  • I didn't like the revenue model. Mint makes money by pushing new financial products on users. I've since realized that — duh! — that's the same way Get Rich Slowly makes money, as well as the rest of the financial web.
  • I was loyal to the folks at Wesabe, a Mint competitor and friend to GRS. Unfortunately, Wesabe shut down earlier this year. (You can read about it here.)
  • Though I fully embrace the Internet Age, I'm still wary of giving one service access to all of my accounts.

But enough GRS readers have sung the praises of Mint over the past two years that I finally decided to give it a try. Yesterday, I set up my Mint account.

Remember: You should always read the terms of use! I know it's a pain, but any time you enter into a legal agreement involving your money, you should read it. This is especially true when buying a home or a car, but it's also true when signing up for an online financial tool. If it involves your money, you should read it. Here are Mint's terms of use.

Getting Started

If you've signed up for any other web-based service, you know what it's like to register for Mint. After you enter your e-mail address, your zip code, and your password, you're ready to go.

Signing up for Mint is standard stuff.

Once you've registered, Mint prompts you to enter your financial accounts. You need just two pieces of information to connect to any account.

You just need two pieces of information to connect to any account.

After you supply your login info for each bank or credit card company, Mint connects to the financial institution and slurps up your recent transactions. (I was pleased when my local credit union connected without incident.)

Mint connects to the financial institution and slurps up your recent transactions.

As you set up your Mint account, you can also add loans, real estate (such as your home), vehicles, and “other” accounts. Other accounts include:

  • Cash (or debt)
  • Collectibles (such as my comic-book collection)
  • Jewelry
  • Furniture and appliances
  • And a variety of miscellaneous items

You can also set up e-mail and text alerts based on a variety of parameters. This feature seems very handy, especially in this age of identity theft. I keep tabs on my accounts regularly to be sure there's no monkey business going on; Mint lets me automate that process.

Mint can alert you if your account balances get too low.

Mint also allows you the option to enter demographic information (which I did),; I'm sure this leads to better-targeted advertising!

You don't have to set everything up at the start. You can edit your accounts whenever you want by clicking “Your Accounts” at the top of any page. Good thing, too, because as I'll share in a moment, the set-up process wasn't without glitches.

Using Mint

You make your way around Mint through a handful of tabs at the top of each page. These include the following.

Overview
The Overview section gives you a Big Picture view of your finances, including account balances and alerts. It's meant to be your home base in Mint.

Transactions
In the Transactions tab, you have access to a day-by-day list of your income and expenses. It's here that you can view and edit each of your purchases (and deposits). Mint automatically assigns a category to each transaction. It does a fairly good job of guessing, but it's not perfect. Fortunately, it seems easy to make changes.

For example, here I'm telling Mint that the bill from Qwest isn't for a home phone (because we don't have one), but for our internet service.

If Mint mis-categorizes something, you can fix it.

I like that this section lets you view transactions from all accounts at once or narrow things to a single account. Handy.

Budgets
The Budgets section lets you, well, erect a budget to keep your spending focused. I haven't had time to play around here, so I can't comment on its utility. I'm hoping that Mint will allow me to put my beloved Balanced Money Formula (or some other broad budget framework) into use.

Goals
The Goals tab lets you set savings goals, and then walks you through the process of creating a realistic budget for each goal. For example, Kris and I want to go to South America in 2012 (or 2013). Here's the start of the goal-setting process:

The goal-setting section is awesome!

You can even create custom goals if the pre-packaged goals (get out of debt, buy a car, and so on) don't meet your needs. The goals section is one of my favorite features of Mint.

Trends
With the Trends tab, Mint shows you standard charts and graphs. I'm sure these will be useful in time — in fact, they're the main reason I want to track my spending! — but at the beginning, there's not much to see.

A standard personal-finance pie chart.

For one thing, there's only about a month of data. For another, a lot of that data is mis-categorized. For example, Mint thinks my payments to State Farm fall in the Financial category. To me, they need to be in a separate Insurance category.

The Trends area will become more useful as Mint accumulates more of my financial data, and as I make sure it's categorized so that it means something to me.

Investments and Ways to Save
The final two tabs are Investments and Ways to Save. Both of these deserve a closer look.

Gripe: Mint pushes FreeCreditScore.com. Ugh. Look, I know the company makes its money by selling financial products, but come on. Don't actively work against your customer's best interests. (AnnualCreditReport.com is the best way to get your actual free credit score report; FreeCreditScore.com is just a come-on for a premium product.)

A Bad Investment?

Not everything is kittens and roses with Mint. In fact, from what I can tell, the Investment feature doesn't work at all.

Mint automatically connects to your invesetment accounts.

I had real trouble connecting Mint to my Fidelity account. I used the correct login and password, but the connection wouldn't go through. Mint offered only a cryptic “Your bank needs you!” message without explaining what the problem was.

Or does it?

Clicking the supplied link just took me to the default Fidelity page, where there was no indication that Fidelity was aware there was a problem.

Puzzled, I decided took a look at the Mint discussion forums. Sure enough, other folks were experiencing similar problems. In fact, there seem to be ongoing issues connecting Mint to Fidelity, and have been for months. It's not an encouraging sign that there are no solutions to be had.

Others have similar problems. Mint just doesn't play well with Fidelity.

I tried to brainstorm some quick fixes, but no dice. Strangely, however, when I went to the Account Settings page, the Fidelity accounts were listed. When I closed the settings page and visited the Investments page, they didn't appear. Huh?

The “add investment account” tool indicated that Mint had now connected to Fidelity — but it showed two of every account: the actual account and a phantom account with a balance of zero dollars. Huh?

When I tried to bring these investment accounts into Mint, I was asked to make additional corrections. After doing so, Mint listed both the real and ghost accounts with zero balances. Huh?

None of this made sense, and there was no help to be found.

I have no idea what's going on here.

After nearly an hour of slogging through various iterations of this madness, I gave up. It seems strange that Mint offers an investment “feature” when it's not ready for prime time. (Or even, apparently, for the late late show.)

How Does Mint Make Money?

Whenever I see a free online service, the first thing I want to know is how the company makes money. Mint makes money through its recommendation engine. Mint looks at your financial habits and existing accounts, and then offers Ways to Save. If you click on this tab, you receive offers in a variety of categories from partner companies. If you sign up, Mint is paid a commission.

This is basically the same revenue model used by personal finance blogs like Get Rich Slowly and The Simple Dollar, as well as big-name sites like Bankrate and Card Ratings. Mint takes it to a new level by comparing your existing accounts and habits to other accounts in its database. For example, here Mint shows that I could save $336 over three years if I moved checking account from my credit union to FNBO Direct.

Mint makes money by recommending new accounts.

These recommendations are probably very useful to many Mint users, and they're much less annoying than I feared they would be.

The Bottom Line

After using Mint for only a few hours, I like what I've seen. Mostly.

The interface is slick, and I can tell the automation is going to be nice. This will indeed let me to track my spending, and may even help prompt me to save for future goals. My big beef is that my investment accounts won't integrate. This isn't necessarily a deal-breaker (I don't make a lot of stock trades), but it's annoying. I'm used to tracking all of my financial data from within Quicken, and I'd like to do that here. Right now, I can't.

I'll use Mint for a few months to see how things go. If I can remember, I'll post an update on Mint during the first part of April, after I've used it full-time for three months. (I don't plan to make Mint a habit until January 1st.)

Meanwhile, perhaps it's time for me to dig through the GRS archives. I've written before about lesser-known personal-finance programs; maybe I should give one of them a spin in the meantime.

If you've used Mint for months or years, I'd love to hear your impressions. Have you managed to get the investment tab to work? (With Fidelity?) Are you pleased with the service? How would you improve it? What should a new user like me know before I get too far?

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Ben
Ben
9 years ago

Maybe I don’t understand correctly how Mint connects to my bank accounts (although I have gone through much of their help pages), but from what I’ve read, you need to give your internet banking username and password to Mint for it to scrape your transaction data.

But if that is the case, then in the event that Mint has a security breach, whoever has that info can login to your bank accounts and transfer money out of your accounts! Isn’t that a huge security risk?

Or am I misunderstanding how Mint gathers the data?

Nate
Nate
9 years ago

I have used mint for 2 years and I love it. I do have a Fidelity investment account (and all my other investment accounts) setup there. Whenever it has an issue I just got to the brokerage website and do something like CHANGE THE PASSWORD on the account — or see if the SECURITY QUESTION needs to be setup — (e.g. “what is your mother’s madden name” — then you give an answer used when logging in). Possibly change one of the security question values — then try syncing with Mint again. I know that sounds really dumb and —… Read more »

LifeAndMyFinances
LifeAndMyFinances
9 years ago

Thanks for the detailed account of Mint.com. I have always tracked all of our personal finances with my own excel sheet. This is no doubt very tedious and I have been thinking about utilizing Mint.com as well.

Will your testimony, I think I might just give it a shot. I’m curious what the other readers have to say! Should I take the plunge as well?

Becky
Becky
9 years ago

I have used Mint for over a year now, and I really love it. I have a credit card and investments that are both at different banks than my main checking and savings accounts. With Mint, I can track them easily in one place, not have to try to remember what I put on the credit card and what the balance is in checking. Some things are annoying, but they are manageable. For example, I put money into savings each month and I have to manually change the positive number to “Exclude from Mint” so that the negative number reads… Read more »

Wil
Wil
9 years ago

I use the Mint investment feature with sharebuilder.com and it works really well. Much better tracking than the Share Builder Tools. Something that you did not mention, but Mint allows you to export all of your transactions to csv for easy export. It can also export your filtered searches for easy expense reports etc… I have been using Mint for almost three years and love it. My wife and I started using it when we got married, and it is great because we both have access to all our transactions. It has been really cool to watch Mint.com develop over… Read more »

Jay
Jay
9 years ago
Just a minor clarification, you indicate that annualcreditreport.com will give you a free credit score; it won’t. You get a free report, but (like other sites) will have to pay for the score

J.D.’s note: Oops. Will fix.

Gail
Gail
9 years ago

I use YNAB software,(the older excel sheet, not their latest) and very happy with it. I’d like to know why Mint would be any easier or better than YNAB. The thought of it being online, how safe is it? I will continue to read what others have to say.

Wayne Mates
Wayne Mates
9 years ago

Nice review, JD. I will be interested to see a review after you have used it several months! Like you, I have been reluctant to entrust all my financial data to one company or website. The thought of my passwords and account numbers, etc in one location causes me to stop and think of the mess created for me if the databases get hacked. Just my two cents…

Michael
Michael
9 years ago

J.D.,

As a long time Quicken user who used to manage our family’s budget through a variety of means including Quicken, PearBudget, Budget Simple, and homemade spreadsheets, you should try YNAB. My wife and I have been using it since December 2009 and it works extremely well and you would be able to apply your Balanced Money Formula quite well in my opinion.

John
John
9 years ago

Does anyone know if Mint allows direct entry for brokerage accounts? I have a few obscure accounts like an employee stock plan that Quicken won’t even direct connect to, so I doubt Mint would either.

If I could hand enter them, I might consider switching to Mint.

FSS
FSS
9 years ago

I’ve had numerous problems with ING not allowing Mint in, and have to re-enter my account details semi-weekly. Other than that I have used Mint for a long time and find it quite useful.

Asa
Asa
9 years ago

I used Mint for a little while, but eventually gave up. I kept having sync issues, particularly with Ing Direct. It would work for a while, then the accounts wouldn’t sync, and I couldn’t get them to come back. Also, I transfer money between accounts a lot (including transfers to and from my partner’s accounts) and Mint would get confused about these transfers. There were several annoyances with regards to reimbursed ATM fees, interest earned on money market accounts and other strange things which required too much manual intervention. In other words, I found I was spending too much time… Read more »

Jen A
Jen A
9 years ago

To commenter 11, FSS – that’s interesting. I have multiple ING accounts linked to Mint and have never had a problem with any of them. My investments are housed with eTrade at the moment, and I haven’t had any issues connecting there, either. My student loans through Sallie Mae are actually the one place where the connection is a problem, and I think that’s Sallie Mae’s fault, not Mint’s – they require you to answer a security question every time you login, so they pass that on to Mint as well, and Mint has no clue what to say for… Read more »

Dink
Dink
9 years ago

Once Intuit acquired Mint, my interest in Mint waned. Intuit pretty much has a monopoly when it comes to financial software and working in IT I deal a lot with them for my clients. One of my least favorite practices of theirs, which seems to be corrected in the latest releases of QuickBooks actually, was seemingly purposefully designing their software online activation to fail (I’ve installed too many instances of QB to count). You would then have to call Intuit up, or rather call their call center in India, to get the activation code; the representative would not give you… Read more »

Sam
Sam
9 years ago
Mint is making money by monetizing its data and you can’t opt out which might be okay with many users but some might be freaked out.

http://bucks.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/03/a-new-way-to-compare-merchants/

Andrew
Andrew
9 years ago

I’ve been using Mint for 3 years now and it’s been great. I’ve had a Fidelity account for about 6 months now and I have had no problems with it. My only complaint is that syncing with ING Direct can be flaky at times. Although a great service, the downside to Mint is that it can’t do long-term budgeting. I’ve worked around that by creating a detailed monthly budget in Excel that takes me out 2-3 years into the future. Yes, it’s two different tools, but it isn’t hard to keep them synchronized.

Anonymous
Anonymous
9 years ago

Have used mint for 14 months. Reference it every day. It’s how I check my credit card statements, investments, and so on. There are a few minor bugs (it seems to think I’ve blown certain budgets that I haven’t), but I love it–completely changes the way that I think about my money.

I kind of can’t believe you gave such a laborious tutorial on working with a simple interface, though! The Fidelity bug was tricky, but that’s what forums are for.

Anonymous
Anonymous
9 years ago

p.s. I also have multiple ING accounts and have never had a problem accessing them through mint. Also have had no problems watching investments with Vanguard, Ariel, or Prosper.

Allie
Allie
9 years ago

I’ve been using Mint for about 4 years now and love it. I have had problems with various accounts over the years. For example, my student loans account connected just fine for a while, and then sometime this spring stopped working for a few months – not sure what changed, but it started working again about a month ago. Goals is pretty new (as of August or July, I think?) and I love it. They really did a great job with that! Unfortunately, you can’t hook goals to your loan accounts for paying them off. My one complaint is that… Read more »

Texas Blondie
Texas Blondie
9 years ago

I have been using Mint for 18 months now, and here are my impressions. 1) The auto-categorizations are not always correct, but it has a handy feature that allows you to make rules (aka this transaction should always be renamed to this and be assigned this category). Once you do it one time, all future (and past transactions if you like) will be updated. 2) We also have set up a budget (a la Dave Ramsey) and use it pretty religiously to make sure we stay on track. We considered using cash as Dave recommends, but I find the data… Read more »

Paige
Paige
9 years ago

I have never used Mint since I am also wary of giving access to a service to all my account information.

What I have been using for the past couple years is GNUCASH, and although the interface is not as pretty as Mint, I have found all its features to be extremely useful. It’s free and opensource!

LMarie
LMarie
9 years ago

I just started using Mint as well, and am thrilled to see a blog post about it. I look forward to hearing your experiences using it. I have linked my 401k, savings, checking, credit, car loan, mortgage, and even paypal accounts to it. I have the mint app as well, which is really handy for checking for new transactions across all accounts when I’m not at home (which is most of the time). I am really pleased with how fast each new transaction updates. Watch out for duplicates. Also, paypal transactions can be confusing.

Another Reader
Another Reader
9 years ago

The software behind Mint is Yodlee, the same as most of these budget/spending tracking programs. Fidelity offered a version as well. I think it was called Full View or something similar. It was buried in a secondary page and I’m not sure they even still offer it. I used Mint for several years and it was very annoying. It would not learn categories and it pushed products that were not good quality or even relevant to my needs. It would think I was over budget when their categorization error was the problem. Recently I opened a Bank of America checking… Read more »

Jim
Jim
9 years ago

I’m glad you are finally giving mint a try. I am a college student with so little time and money. Mint was the first budgeting method that actually worked for me and I have been using it for a bit over 2 years now with no problems at all (minus the flaky credit report offer). I have highly recommended it to my friends and family for years. The best part is if the service isn’t enough you can still export your finances to analyze in quicken later, so there is no walled garden here. Hope it treats you well!

Rhiannon
Rhiannon
9 years ago

I have been using Mint for a while now and have had no problems syncing with my Fidelity (and Vanguard) investment accounts. The only annoying thing I have is that I have to correct my credit union account every time I log in. But I think that’s an issue with the Credit Union itself rather than with Mint. I hope you work your issues with Fidelity out, b/c Mint is fantastic once you get it up and running!

Mary
Mary
9 years ago

I’ve used mint for 11 months, which means the reports, alerts and average spending data are just starting to be useful. I the accounts people have trouble with are pretty random. I had tons of issues with my BOA mortgage, but have never had problems with my ING accounts. My boyfriend has fixed most of my problems by looking through the help sections at the known issues…a lot of them you just need to delete the account entirely and readd it. I wrote up a guide to Mint for my friend, including some of the issues and things that I’ve… Read more »

Aaron
Aaron
9 years ago

I’ve used mint for over a year and I used to have issues with my ING investment accounts, but those have been stable now for probably 6 months or more. Sometimes a bank or brokerage house takes issue with Mint’s method of getting your data and actively works to disrupt the process. ING did this for a while and finally relented. So this kind of behavior could happen with any account at any time. In regards to the goals, you still can’t budget them in, they come out of your surplus at the end of the month. This is aggravating… Read more »

hopefully_helpful
hopefully_helpful
9 years ago

I think the reason for the security questions is based on how “good” your password is. Try using a number, a capital letter, a word that isn’t in the dictionary, and a special character. I think the problem the author had was probably based on this too… Security is probably the reason Mint wants you to keep logging in. Its good to question the security on sites that aggregate your accounts though. I recently signed up with Mint too – I read that they have been vetted by an independent security group. I think it would be great to talk… Read more »

Rachel
Rachel
9 years ago

I’m SO GLAD you posted about this! We just started using Mint a couple of weeks ago, and I have a huge issue with their budgeting tool. I just can’t quite figure out how to get it detailed enough. For instance, my husband and I both get paid twice a month, but not on the same day (his is 1st and 15th, mine is 5th and 20th). When I go to enter a paycheck, it won’t let me change the frequency. It only gives me the option for once a month. Confession: I haven’t spent much time noodling around on… Read more »

shann
shann
9 years ago

your description of the problems with Fidelity (and others’ descriptions of problems with ING in the comments) is what ultimately swayed my decision to move from Mint to Yodlee (moneycenter.yodlee.com). it has all of the elements that i loved about mint (trend tracking, ability to categorize expenses – it does this correctly for me automatically about 90% of the time, and graphical representations of my net worth) with that added perk that my accounts actually WORK with it.

William
William
9 years ago

I’ve been using Mint for two years and it’s helped my wife and I get out of a tremendous amount of debt.

I have had similar investments trouble with multiple investments accounts. I have opened repeated tickets with Mint and have been told they are investing considerable time into revamping the investments tab right now to make it more usable. I am in the middle of a 6 month period where one of my two investment accounts will load data but not the other (with the same company) but shows as updated on the overview.

Stephen Schrauger
Stephen Schrauger
9 years ago

I’ve used Mint for about 6 months now, and I really love it. I previously used a quicken-like program (gnucash), but I would often go for a month or more without putting in my receipts and then have to spend a day to get caught up. Here are some of my thoughts: Advantages (aside from the ones already mentioned in the article): * Mint comes with a lot of built-in categories. If there isn’t one for you, it is simple to create your own category. * It can split transactions. So if you wrote a combined $1000 check for rent… Read more »

Dan
Dan
9 years ago

I started using mint a few months ago. Like you, I’ve had a mostly positive impression, with a few things to note: 1) It took me a while to figure out how to set up rules for classifying transactions. As you already noticed, it’s easy to reclassify a single transaction. To do that automatically in the future you need to change it on a single transaction first, then click the “edit details” link beneath the transaction. It will have a “rules” section in the details window letting you tell it to do that automatically in the future. 2) Related to… Read more »

Texas Blondie
Texas Blondie
9 years ago

I have been using Mint for 18 months now, and here are my impressions.  1) The auto-categorizations are not always correct, but it has a handy feature that allows you to make rules (aka this transaction should always be renamed to this and be assigned this category).  Once you do it one time, all future (and past transactions if you like) will be updated. 2) We also have set up a budget (a la Dave Ramsey) and use it pretty religiously to make sure we stay on track.  We considered using cash as Dave recommends, but I find the data… Read more »

Jay
Jay
9 years ago

To commentor 23. I believe Yodlee writes the back end application that powers Mint. At least it was when they first started out.

Adam
Adam
9 years ago

Wow, J.D., looks like a heck of a party on November 17th…that screenshot shows a $375 bar tab. 🙂

J.D.’s note: Ha. Not a bar tab, but our annual November wine purchase for the coming year. I buy by the case to get the cost down…

Steve S
Steve S
9 years ago

Just wanted to confirm one more person who uses Mint and connects to Fidelity & Charles Schwab without incident.

Not sure what the problem is, but glad I don’t have it!

Jennifer
Jennifer
9 years ago

I have a couple fidelity accounts successfully linked. I’m not sure what the trick is though. I’m not sure how to track everything as a couple. Right now I have mint tracking BOTH of our accounts in one mint account. Connections with account break fairly often and you have to go through the “fix it” process. It’s never on my credit card I use for every day purchases or my checking account so I can still use mint for day to day things. But my student loans break a lot & I like to see those going down! It’s definitely… Read more »

Ray Matsuzaki
Ray Matsuzaki
9 years ago

I’ve been using Mint for ~2 years, and I’m enjoying using it. Since Mint was acquired by Intuit, issues have been cropping up more frequently – mainly due to their transition from Yodlee back-end (software used to transfer bank data) to Intuit’s proprietary communications. It’s been better in the last few months than during this past spring. One of the things that makes me more secure about using Mint than some other sites is that they (purposefully) don’t allow you to trigger bank-to-bank transactions. This is a security “feature” – in case someone hacks your account. Another feature that drew… Read more »

Asylum
Asylum
9 years ago

I’ve been using Mint for about two years now. I’ve gone from being about $20k in debt, to about $5k in debt. Now, I won’t say that Mint is solely responsible for that. It took me *wanting* to do it, obviously. But, the fact is, Mint.com made it fairly easy for me to see what I have, what I owe, what I’m spending on, etc. For the last 24 months, I’ve set up a fairly aggressive budget that I try my hardest to meet (I don’t always, but thats not the point), and I should be completely debt free in… Read more »

Holly
Holly
9 years ago

I have had Mint for about 6 months now and I still don’t find it very useful. It won’t connect with my mortgage info (small institution not supported) or my state retirement fund. Also, since I prefer to keep info at hand on my iphone, I don’t find the Mint iphone interface very friendly. On the other hand, I got an iPhone app simply called “accounts” that is working well. It is an old-fashioned manual register where you have to create your own categories and enter info yourself, but then it can run monthly reports and graphs if you want… Read more »

Rachel211
Rachel211
9 years ago

I was amazed that we were never able to put our mortgage in as a loan through Countrywide. That was what made me stop using it initially – but maybe now that BofA owns our loan I should try it again.

Joe D
Joe D
9 years ago

Great write-up J.D. Great initials as well. I’ve been using Mint on and off, and it is a wonderful resource for the right circumstances. For me however, the best way is a manually updated Excel spreadsheet. It forces me to sit down and feel in control, rather than spending and monitoring while the numbers are crunched for me. It’s a time suck of course (and for the economists in the crowd, not the best use of opportunity cost), but this sort of manual updating keeps me in check and makes the purchases and bill paying all the more personal. For… Read more »

Daniel
Daniel
9 years ago

My wife and I have used mint for a couple of years now, and my Fidelity and Vanguard investment accounts show up just fine! We had set up our budget in Mint, using the “roll-over” feature to carry overages from one month to the next hoping it would encourage us to save more in that category. After about of year of this, we abandoned that tactic because starting the month “over budget” was not making us save, it was making us feel like we were already defeated. This month, we’ve moved to a different system: we set up a budget… Read more »

DM
DM
9 years ago

I’ve been using Mint for about 6 months now and I’m ready to move on.

I’ve just had too many problems with Mint not working. Also, every time I find a bug, the forums reveal the problem has been happening on and off for a long time with little to no response from Mint. It is very discouraging.

Jeff @ Sustainable Life Blog
Jeff @ Sustainable Life Blog
9 years ago

I’ve been using mint since feb 08, and for the most part it has been great. Occasionally I run into some connection problems with my ING account, but everything else has worked great. It’s been really helpful to see the big picture, and it gets better the more data that they have in there.

Lacubrious
Lacubrious
9 years ago

I LOVE MINT! I’ve been using it for 1.5 years now. It’s helped me track my debt and motivated me to cut it in half over that time. It does have some issues at times connecting to certain banks or accounts, but like you I generally just check the forums and see if others are having issues as well. All of mine have eventually been resolved. I LOVE MINT! Can’t say it enough. It is also great because my spouse can see at a glance on his iPhone just where we are at…it’s made financial discussions much better!

April
April
9 years ago

The reason I quit using it, after two separate attempts, is that I ran into glitches that were misreporting my spending. After several attempts to contact Mint to get help, and ZERO help from them, I deleted my account. For example, I had a category called “personal items” where I tracked things like toiletries. Typically this category is very low, but one day it said $400-something. I tried to expand the view to see what the charges were, and it timed out. Over and over it timed out, over a period of three weeks. I checked all of my statements,… Read more »

rb
rb
9 years ago

I have been using Mint for the last 1yr and love it. It is not perfect, but I finally have a handle of finances after tring lots of different programs. It tracks my IRA/401K’s and spouse’s just fine. I initially had lots of problems getting my main checking acct at NFCU to connect and finally after trying nearly 50 times it connected and has been great.
I love that as I pay down debt, Mint gives a running tally of my net worth and I can see light at the end of the tunnel from day to day.

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
9 years ago

Hey, everyone: I’m experimenting with in-line replies to comments when I don’t have anything major to say. You can see them scattered throughout this thread. If I do have something major to say, I’ll start my own comment.

Please let me know if you find this helpful or annoying…

Also, yet again a lot of legit comments are being routed to spam. I’m going to be out and about this morning, so it may take me some time to salvage them. Have no fear, though: If you’re a real commenter with a real comment, I will save your message…

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